Browse results

Restricted Access

Series:

Edited by Cilliers Breytenbach and Christoph Markschies

The chapters in this volume cover all aspects of the work of Adolf Deissmann (1866–1937). Following his main works, the authors highlight crucial aspects and impulses from his philological work on the New Testament, including the interpretation of Paul, Light from the Ancient East, the social status of the first Christians, and the lexicography of the New Testament. His background in the Lutheran Church of Hessen-Nassau, his contribution to the ecumenical movement together with Nathan Söderblom and through the Evangelische Wochenbriefe during World War II, and his role as rector of the Berlin University in 1930/1931 are also discussed. The contributions illustrate that notwithstanding his ecumenical engagement, Deissmann never gave up his scholarly work. The essays trace the influence of his philological and historical work among his students and place contemporary debates on Deissmann as philologist and theologian in their historical context.

Dieser Band widmet sich in neun Einzelbeiträgen der gesamten Breite des Schaffens von Adolf Deissmann (1866–1937). Entlang der Hauptwerken werden wesentliche Aspekte und Impulse aus seiner philologisch orientierten Arbeit am Neuen Testament neu gewürdigt (Interpretation der Paulusbriefe, Licht vom Osten, „Unterschichtenthese“, neutestamentliche Lexikographie etc.). Daneben geht es um seine Herkunft aus der Evangelischen Kirche in Hessen-Nassau, um sein Wirken in der Ökumene am Beispiel der Beziehung zu Nathan Söderblom und der Arbeit an den Evangelischen Wochenbriefen im Ersten Weltkrieg sowie um seine Rolle als Rektor der Berliner Universität von 1930 bis 1931. Die Beiträge zeigen, dass Deissmann trotz seines ökumenischen Engagements seine wissenschaftliche Arbeit nicht aufgegeben hat. Die Aufsätze gehen den Wirkungen seiner philologisch-historischen Arbeit unter seinen Schülern nach und stellen die zeitgenössischen Debatten um den Philologen und Theologen Deissmann in ihren historischen Kontext.
Restricted Access

Series:

Edited by David Frankfurter

In the midst of academic debates about the utility of the term “magic” and the cultural meaning of ancient words like mageia or khesheph, this Guide to the Study of Ancient Magic seeks to advance the discussion by separating out three topics essential to the very idea of magic. The three major sections of this volume address (1) indigenous terminologies for ambiguous or illicit ritual in antiquity; (2) the ancient texts, manuals, and artifacts commonly designated “magical” or used to represent ancient magic; and (3) a series of contexts, from the written word to materiality itself, to which the term “magic” might usefully pertain.

The individual essays in this volume cover most of Mediterranean and Near Eastern antiquity, with essays by both established and emergent scholars of ancient religions.

In a burgeoning field of “magic studies” trying both to preserve and to justify critically the category itself, this volume brings new clarity and provocative insights. This will be an indispensable resource to all interested in magic in the Bible and the Ancient Near East, ancient Greece and Rome, Early Christianity and Judaism, Egypt through the Christian period, and also comparative and critical theory.
Restricted Access

Gwynaeth McIntyre

As political power in Rome became centered on the emperor and his family, a system of honors and titles developed as one way to negotiate this new power dynamic. Classified under the modern collective heading ‘imperial cult’ (or emperor worship or ruler cult), this system of worship comprises religious rituals as well as political, economic, and social aspects. In this article, Gwynaeth McIntyre surveys the range of ancient literary sources and modern scholarly debates on how individuals became gods in the Roman world. Beginning with the development of exceptional honors granted to Julius Caesar and his deification, she traces the development of honors, symbols, and religious rituals associated with the worship of imperial family members. She uses case studies to illustrate how cult practices, temples, and priesthoods were established, highlighting the careful negotiation required between the emperor, imperial family, Senate, and populace in order to make mortals into gods.
Restricted Access

Series:

Edited by AnneMarie Luijendijk and William E. Klingshirn

Sortilege—the making of decisions by casting lots—was widely practiced in the Mediterranean world during the period known as late antiquity, between the third and eighth centuries CE. In My Lots are in Thy Hands: Sortilege and its Practitioners in Late Antiquity, AnneMarie Luijendijk and William Klingshirn have collected fourteen essays that examine late antique lot divination, especially but not exclusively through texts preserved in Greek, Latin, Coptic, and Syriac. Employing the overlapping perspectives of religious studies, classics, anthropology, economics, and history, contributors study a variety of topics, including the hermeneutics and operations of divinatory texts, the importance of diviners and their instruments, and the place of faith and doubt in the search for hidden order in a seemingly random world.
Restricted Access

Series:

Edited by Florian Wilk

Scriptural Interpretation at the Interface between Education and Religion examines prominent texts from Jewish, Christian, and Islamic communities with a view to determining to what extent education ( Bildung) represents the precondition, the central feature and/or the aim of the interpretation of 'Holy Scripture' in antiquity. In particular, consideration is given to the exegetical techniques, the hermeneutical convictions and the contexts of intercultural exchange which determine the process of interpretation. The volume contains a methodological reflection as well as investigations of scriptural interpretation in Jewish texts from the 2nd and 1st centuries B.C.E., in New Testament writings, and in witnesses from late ancient Christianity and in the Qur’an. Finally, it contains a critical appraisal of the scholarly oeuvre of Hans Conzelmann. This work thus fosters scholarly understanding of the function of scriptural interpretation at the interface between education and religion.
Restricted Access

Religions and Education in Antiquity

Studies in Honour of Michel Desjardins

Series:

Edited by Alex Damm

Religions and Education in Antiquity gathers ten essays on teaching and learning in the contexts of ancient Western religions, including Judaism, early Christianity and Gnostic Christian traditions. Beginning with an overview of religious education in the ancient Near Eastern and Mediterranean worlds, editor Alex Damm and the contributors together demonstrate the mutual influence of religion and education on each other; the relevance of educational traditions in addressing (for instance) historical or exegetical issues; and the thoroughgoing importance of education to religious life across time and space in antiquity. Highly useful to scholars of religion, theology, classics and education, this volume affords a state of the art study on pedagogy and learning in ancient religious contexts.
Restricted Access

The Religious Worldviews Reflected in the Dead Sea Scrolls

Proceedings of the Fourteenth International Symposium of the Orion Center for the Study of the Dead Sea Scrolls and Associated Literature, 28–30 May, 2013

Series:

Edited by Ruth A. Clements, Menahem Kister and Michael Segal

The Dead Sea Scrolls offer a window onto the rich theological landscape of Judaism in the Second Temple period. Through careful textual analysis, the authors of these twelve studies explore such topics as dualism and determinism, esoteric knowledge, eschatology and covenant, the nature of heaven and / or the divine, moral agency, and more; as well as connections between concepts expressed in the Qumran corpus and in later Jewish and Christian literature. The religious worldviews reflected in the Scrolls constitute part of the ideological environment of Second Temple Judaism; the analysis of these texts is essential for the reconstruction of that milieu. Taken together, these studies indicate the breadth and depth of theological reflection in the Second Temple period.
Restricted Access

Series:

Edited by Valentino Gasparini and Richard Veymiers

In Individuals and Materials in the Greco-Roman Cults of Isis Valentino Gasparini and Richard Veymiers present a collection of reflections on the individuals and groups which animated one of Antiquity’s most dynamic, significant and popular religious phenomena: the reception of the cults of Isis and other Egyptian gods throughout the Hellenistic and Roman worlds. These communities, whose members seem to share the same religious identity, for a long time have been studied in a monolithic way through the prism of the Cumontian category of the “Oriental religions”. The 26 contributions of this book, divided into three sections devoted to the “agents”, their “images” and their “practices”, shed new light on this religious movement that appears much more heterogeneous and colorful than previously recognized.