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Author: Joseph Citron
In this book, Joseph Citron offers the first comprehensive analysis of Prague Rabbi Isaiah Horowitz’s (c.1565-c.1626) magnum opus of Jewish ethical literature, the Shnei Luhot Ha-Berit. Citron’s close philological analysis reveals the pioneering nature of the work in creating an organic Jewish theological system rooted in the mystical structures of Kabbalah, cultivating an orthodoxy in thought and legal practice based upon its principles. It provided a platform for laypeople to attain great spiritual heights by emphasising that God could be served and cleaved to through mundane activity, and that Judaism demanded deep emotion and joy as much as Talmudic erudition or meticulous observance. The Shelah's paradigms significantly influenced 17th-century Sabbatean movement, the 18th-century Hasidic movement, and Jewish Orthodoxy in the 19th century. The book is essential for scholars and laypeople alike wishing to understand the evolution of Judaism in Central and Eastern Europe in the early modern period.
Author: Gerrit Bos
This edition contains the collected English translations of the series The Medical Works of Moses Maimonides (17 vols., 2002–2021) that were published by Gerrit Bos in parallel critical editions along with the original Arabic texts. The collection offers three main medical treatises by Maimonides (1138–1204) ( Medical Aphorisms; Commentary on Hippocrates’ Aphorisms; On Poisons and the Protection against Lethal Drugs and six minor ones ( On Coitus; On the Regimen of Health; On the Elucidation of Some Symptoms and the Response to Them; On Hemorrhoids; On Asthma; On Rules Regarding the Practical Part of the Medical Art, presented for the first time in one harmonized volume, supplemented by indexes of diseases, medicinal ingredients, and quoted physicians.
Author: Gerrit Bos
This volume is both a continuation of the four already published titles in the series (2011–19) and an addition to the Concise Dictionary of Novel Medical and General Hebrew Terminology from the Middle Ages. It continues mapping the medical terminology featured in medieval Hebrew medical works in order to facilitate study of medical terms that do not appear in the existing dictionaries, as well as identifying the medical terminology used by specific authors and translators in order to identify anonymous medical material.

The terminology discussed in this volume has been derived from fourteen different sources, including translations of Ibn al-Jazzār’s Zād al-musāfir by Moses ibn Tibbon ( Sefer Ṣedat ha-Derakhim) and the otherwise unknown Abraham ben Isaac ( Sefer Ṣedah la-Oreḥim), as well as the translation of Constantine the Africanʼs Latin version ( Viaticum) prepared by Do’eg ha-Edomi ( Sefer Yaʾir Netiv).
Permitting and Forbidding Open Inquiry in 12-15th Century Europe and North Africa
Author: Yehuda Halper
Yehuda Halper examines Jewish depictions of Socrates and Socratic questioning of the divine among European and North African Jews of the 12th-15th centuries. Without direct access to Plato, their understanding of Socrates is indirect, based on legendary material, on fragmentary quotations from Plato, or on Aristotle. Out of these sources, Jewish authors of this period formed two distinct views of Socrates: one as a wise, ascetic, monotheist, and the other as a vocal skeptic. The latter view has its roots in Plato's Apology where Socrates describes his divine mandate to question all knowledge, including knowledge of the divine. After exploring how this and similar questions arise in the works of Judah Halevi and the Hebrew Averroes, Halper traces how such open-questioning of the divine arises in the works of Maimonides, Jacob Anatoli, Gersonides, and Abraham Bibago.
Editor: Giuseppe Veltri
The Maimonides Library for Philosophy and Religion aims to present a wide spectrum of studies and texts that cover philosophy and religion in a Jewish context, broadly construed. The series seeks to explore connections, tensions, and dialectics between philosophy and religion in Jewish tradition through monographs, collected volumes, scholarly translations, and critical editions of key texts. Special emphasis will be given to unearth sceptical elements within Jewish thought and in relation to other traditions, as well as to its interactions with the scientific and intellectual climate in which it is situated.
Accounting for the Commandments in Medieval Judaism explores the discursive formation of the commandments as a generative matrix of Jewish thought and life in the posttalmudic period. Each study sheds light on how medieval Jews crafted the commandments out of theretofore underdetermined material. By systematizing, representing, or interrogating the amorphous category of commandment, medieval Jewish authors across both the Islamic and Christian spheres of influence sought to explain, justify, and characterize Israel’s legal system, divine revelation, the cosmos, and even the divine order. This volume correlates bodies of knowledge—such as jurisprudence, philosophy, ethics, pietism, and kabbalah—that are normally treated in isolation into a single conversation about a shared constitutional concern.
Critical Editions of the Translation by Moses Ibn Tibbon and the Translation Ascribed to Rabbi Jacob, with an Introduction and Glossary. Books I–II
Author: Ofer Elior
Euclid's Elements is one of the canonical texts that shaped our cultural heritage. It was translated from Greek into Arabic and from Arabic into Hebrew and Latin. There is little agreement about the textual history of the Arabic translations. The present book offers for the first time a critical edition of two Hebrew translations of Books I–II, by Moses Ibn Tibbon and by "Rabbi Jacob". A serious attempt is made to learn from the Hebrew translations also about the history of the Arabic text. The edition of Ibn Tibbon's translation is accompanied by an Arabic text which was probably its source. Rabbi Jacob's translation is compared to the Latin translation ascribed to Adelard of Bath, probably based on the same Arabic tradition.
Volume Editors: Antonios Kalatzis and Enrico Lucca
The articles collected in "Into Life." Franz Rosenzweig on Knowledge, Aesthetics, and Politics focus on the significance of Franz Rosenzweig's work far beyond the realms of theology and philosophy of religion. They engage with a wide range of issues in philosophy and offer new insights, both by presenting an array of unpublished and underestimated sources and by bringing Rosenzweig's thought into dialogue with new approaches and interlocutors, such as Stanley Cavell, William Alston, Carl Schmitt, and Martin Heidegger. The result is a refreshing and original perspective on the work of one of the most significant thinkers of the twentieth century.
This book presents an edition and English translation of a medieval commentary on the book of Hosea that was written by an anonymous Karaite author in the Middle Ages. The text has been established by joining together hundreds of small fragments that have been preserved in the Cairo Genizah collections. The edited work is written in Judaeo-Arabic (Arabic in Hebrew letters). The publication includes copious notes, which clarify the meaning and background of the text. This book brings into the light of scholarship an important but hitherto lost text in the intellectual history of the Karaites.
Author: Peder Borgen
Volume Editor: Torrey Seland
This volume contains a collection of 17 essays on Philo written by Peder Borgen between 1987 and 2018.
The first six studies deal with important issues in Philo’s religious thought and social world, such as his views on Flaccus, prayers, and his eschatology. The next five essays illustrate how an understanding of Philo can contribute to the interpretation of Paul, especially his Letter to the Galatians. The final six studies deal with the importance of Philo’s writings for the interpretation of the Revelation of John, a subject too rarely touched upon in recent scholarship.