Browse results

In The Lyon Terence Giulia Torello-Hill and Andrew J. Turner take an unprecedented interdisciplinary approach to map out the influence of Late-Antique and Medieval commentary and iconographic traditions over this seminal edition of the plays of Terence, published in Lyon in 1493, and examine its legacy. The work had a profound impact on the way Terence’s plays were read and understood throughout the sixteenth century, but its influence has been poorly recognised in modern scholarship. The authors establish the pivotal role that this book, and its editor Badius, played in the revitalisation of the theoretical understanding of Classical comedy and in the revival of the plays of Terence that foreshadowed the establishment of early modern theatre in Italy and France.
The wide scholarly interests of Scots in the Restoration period are analysed by Murray Simpson through this in-depth study of the library of James Nairn (1629-1678), a Scottish parish minister. The collection demonstrates a remarkable receptivity to new intellectual ideas. At some two thousand titles Nairn’s is the biggest library formed in this period for which we have detailed and accurate records. The collection is analysed by subject. In addition, there is a biographical study and chapters investigating aspects of the Scottish book market and comparing other contemporary Scottish clerical libraries. A short-title catalogue of the collection, giving references to relevant online bibliographies and catalogues, a select provenance index and a subject index complete the work.
Author: Efraim Wust
The Yahuda Collection was bequeathed to the National Library of Israel by one of the twentieth century's most knowledgeable and important collectors, Abraham Shalom Yahuda (d. 1951). The rich and multifaceted collection of 1,186 manuscripts, spanning ten centuries, includes works representing the major Islamic disciplines and literary traditions. Highlights include illuminated manuscripts from Mamluk, Mughal, and Ottoman court libraries; rare, early copies of medieval scholarly treatises; and early modern autograph copies.

In this groundbreaking Arabic catalogue, Efraim Wust synthesizes the Islamic and Western manuscript traditions to enrich our understanding of the manuscripts and their compositions. His combined treatment of Arabic, Persian, and Turkish manuscripts preserves the integrity of the collection and honors the multicultural history of the Islamic intellectual traditions.
La materialidad de la escritura en las literaturas ibéricas de la Edad Media a la temprana modernidad
How is a body written, and in which ways can literary texts shed light on the tension between immediate bodily expressions and writing if medieval writing practices compete with the new technology of printing? The present volume Escritura somática: La materialidad de la escritura en las literaturas ibéricas de la Edad Media a la temprana modernidad explores the relations between corporality and writing in genres and discourses that are key for understanding the phenomenon. The Iberian perspective, including contributions on Spanish and Portuguese texts, focusses on the materiality of writing with a shared epistemic frame.

Contributors are Isabel de Barros Dias, Stephanie Béreiziat-Lang, Juan Casas Rigall, Robert Folger, Juan Pablo Mauricio García Álvarez, Miguel García-Bermejo Giner, Folke Gernert, Santiago Gutiérrez García, Simon Kroll, Miriam Palacios Larrosa, Adrián J. Sáez, and Margarida Santos Alpalhão.
Newly Discovered Hebrew Binding Fragments in Context. European Genizah Texts and Studies, Volume 5
This volume includes contributions presented at two conferences, in Mainz and Jerusalem, and presents new discoveries of binding fragments in several European libraries and archives and abroad. It presents newly discovered texts with unknown Jewish writings from the Middle Ages and analyses fragments of well-known texts, such as textual witnesses of Midrashim. One chapter overviews recent discoveries in certain collections, some of them far beyond the geographical horizon of the original project, but certainly all of European origin. Other chapters study palaeographical and codicological issues of manuscript fragments and Ashkenazic inscriptions. A final article refers to the beginnings of scholarly interest in Hebrew binding fragments in Germany and sheds light on the part played by Christian Hebraists in its development.
Poetry and Politics at the Court of Mary Tudor
Author: Matthew Tibble
In Nicolaus Mameranus, Matthew Tibble recovers an obscure but revealing body of poetry and political commentary that the Imperial poet laureate Nicolaus Mameranus produced for the court of Mary I of England during the visit of her husband, Philip II of Spain, in 1557.
Where most studies portray this period as one of decline and decay, Tibble argues instead that, for many Catholics, 1557 was characterised by hope and a sense of progression. He argues that the royal couple successfully re-forged their image as the embodiment of a political union that many considered the foundation of a new Anglo-Habsburg dynasty, and, equally successfully, represented their dual monarchy as a bastion in the fight to reform Catholic Christianity in response to the Protestant Reformation.
Proceedings of the Seventeenth International Congress of Neo-Latin Studies (Albacete 2018)
Every third year, the members of the International Association for Neo-Latin Studies (IANLS) assemble for a week-long conference. Over the years, this event has evolved into the largest single conference in the field of Neo-Latin studies. The papers presented at these conferences offer, then, a general overview of the current status of Neo-Latin research; its current trends, popular topics, and methodologies. In 2018, the members of IANLS gathered for a conference in Albacete (Spain) on the theme of “Humanity and Nature: Arts and Sciences in Neo-Latin Literature”. This volume presents the conference’s papers which were submitted after the event and which have undergone a peer-review process. The papers deal with a broad range of fields, including literature, history, philology, and religious studies.

Abstract

En las Centurias, Amato Lusitano recoge su experiencia profesional. Una de las enfermedades que aparece retratada es la entonces conocida como morbo gálico. Estudiar cómo Amato Lusitano aborda esta enfermedad en las distintas curationes, a qué pacientes trata y con qué medicamentos y recomendaciones, permite adentrarse en su modo general de componer el relato patográfico. Además, dada la ‘novedad’ que en la medicina del siglo XVI supone la enfermedad, el comportamiento de Amato permite ver cómo se refleja en su obra la polémica contemporánea y su vinculación con las autoridades médicas o su preferencia por la experientia como fuente de autoridad.

In: Acta Conventus Neo-Latini Albasitensis

Abstract

La valoración desde el punto de vista de la crítica textual de los testimonios que transmiten la traducción latina de la Política de Leonardo Bruni es todavía una tarea pendiente de la filología latina humanística. Tras el estudio del comportamiento de diecisiete testimonios (diez manuscritos y siete ediciones impresas) de dicha obra mediante la comparación de unos pasajes significativos, es posible establecer un primer grupo de manuscritos, bastante homogéneo tanto en lo que respecta al estado del texto que transmiten como a sus características físicas, creados para el estudio académico (entre ellos están F3, M2, Ma, Mc; y también M1, aunque éste presenta especificidades propias); y un segundo grupo, formado por ejemplares de lujo, cuyo texto transmitido resulta más heterogéneo (P, F4, V1 y V2). Un papel crucial en la transmisión parece jugar el manuscrito F1 (Florencia, BML, MS Plut. 89 sup. 54), pues en él se observan lecturas dobles que definen esos dos grupos descritos. En cuanto a las ediciones impresas, estas presentan igualmente un estado del texto muy variado; no obstante, puede seguirse una línea de transmisión que parte de la edición de Valencia por Lambert Palmart en 1473 (v) y pasa por la “revolucionaria” recensión de Jacques Lefèvre d’Étaples, impresa en París por Henri Estienne en 1506 (pfs), hasta llegar a las ediciones basilienses de Johann Oporin en 1538 y 1542 (o1 y o2 respectivamente).

In: Acta Conventus Neo-Latini Albasitensis

Abstract

Western Europeans (fifteenth–sixteenth century) travelled to Southeastern Greece and the Mediterranean by land or sea for various purposes, such us commerce, pilgrimage to the Holy Land or diplomatic missions. Erudite Italian humanists interested in antiquity toured the Greek islands and partly explored continental Greece. They recorded their journeys in the early travelogues. Travellers with a certain theoretical baggage recount the historical past, drawing upon Greek and Latin literature, as well as their personal experiences from their travels. The present paper focuses on the perception of nature and people, as presented in three different types of literary genres: an isolario, a diary and a narrative poem. Cristoforo Buondelmonti in his isolario Liber insularum archipelagi (1420), Ciriaco d’ Ancona in his Diaries from his early and later travels (1400–45), and Hugo Favolius in his epic poem Hodoeporici Byzantini libri III (1563) enrich their reminiscences of the classical past with representations of Greek nature and comments upon the people they encounter. This article aims to explore the varied approaches of the writers and the aspects of Greek nature and the local people, which are enhanced in their travel accounts.

In: Acta Conventus Neo-Latini Albasitensis