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Ambrogio Leone's De Nola, Venice 1514

Humanism and Antiquarian Culture in Renaissance Southern Italy

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This volume offers the first multidisciplinary study of the De Nola (Venice 1514), a hitherto underestimated Latin work written by the Nolan humanist and physician Ambrogio Leone. Furnished by four pioneering engravings made with the help of the Venetian artist Girolamo Mocetto, the De Nola is an impressively rich and multifaceted text, which contains an antiquarian (and celebrative) study of the city of Nola, in the Kingdom of Naples. By describing antiquities, inscriptions, buildings, but also social and religious aspects, the De Nola offers a precious insight of a southern Italy centre in the Renaissance, and constitutes a refined example of 16th century antiquarianism. The work is analysed through an interdisciplinary approach, encompassing art and architecture history, antiquarianism, literature, social history, and anthropology.
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Brabantia Ducatus

Geschiedenis en Cartobibliografie van het Hertogdom Brabant tot 1795

Mario Dorigo and Mathieu Franssen

Deze inventarisatie van de gedrukte kaarten van het hertogdom Brabant omvat alle kaarten die gepubliceerd zijn tussen 1536, wanneer voor het eerst een kaart van Brabant wordt vermeld, en 1795, toen het feodale hertogdom werd opgeheven. De cartobibliografie betreft uitsluitend gedrukte kaarten, zowel houtsneden als koperdiepdrukken. In vier introductiehoofdstukken worden achtereenvolgens de geschiedenis van het hertogdom, de cartografie van het hertogdom, de wijzingen in het kaartbeeld in de loop van de tijd en de ontwikkeling van de nauwkeurigheid van kaarten met behulp van het programma MapAnalyst beschreven.
De cartobibliografie bevat kaarten van het hele hertogdom, de vier kwartieren, het noorden en het zuiden en een viertal historische kaarten. Alle kaarttitels zijn volledig, aangevuld met een toelichting, de publicatiewijze en een lijst van vindplaatsen, met nadruk op Nederland en België.

This catalogue of printed maps of the Duchy of Brabant includes all the maps published between 1536, the date of the earliest mention of a map of Brabant, and 1795, when the feudal duchy was abolished. It includes woodcuts and intaglio prints. Four introductory chapters discribe the history of the duchy, the catrography of the duchy, the changes in the cartographic image over time and the evolution of the accuracy of the maps over time.
The cartobibliography contains maps of the entire duchy, maps of the four quarters, and maps of the north and south. All map titles are complete and supplemented with explanatory remarks, the manner of publication, and a list of locations where copies can be found, emphasizing the Netherlands and Belgium.
In Dutch, with an English summary.
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Networked Nation

Mapping German Cities in Sebastian Münster’s Cosmographia

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Jasper Cornelis van Putten

In Networked Nation: Mapping German Cities in Sebastian Münster’s 'Cosmographia', Jasper van Putten examines the groundbreaking woodcut city views in the German humanist Sebastian Münster’s Cosmographia. This description of the world, published in Basel from 1544 to 1628, glorified the Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation and engendered the city book genre. Van Putten argues that Münster’s network of city view makers and contributors—from German princes and artists to Swiss woodcutters, draftsmen, and printers—expressed their local and national cultural identities in the views. The Cosmographia, and the city books it inspired, offer insights into the development of German and Swiss identity from 1550 to Switzerland’s independence from the empire in 1648.
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Companions in Geography

East-West Collaboration in the Mapping of Qing China (c.1685-1735)

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Mario Cams

In Companions in Geography Mario Cams revisits the early 18th century mapping of Qing China, without doubt one of the largest cartographic endeavours of the early modern world. Commonly seen as a Jesuit initiative, the project appears here as the result of a convergence of interests among the French Academy of Sciences, the Jesuit order, and the Kangxi emperor (r. 1661-1722). These connections inspired the gradual integration of European and East Asian scientific practices and led to a period of intense land surveying, executed by large teams of Qing officials and European missionaries. The resulting maps and atlases, all widely circulated across Eurasia, remained the most authoritative cartographic representations of continental East Asia for over a century.

This book is based on Dr. Mario Cams' dissertation, which has been awarded the "2017 DHST Prize for Young Scholars" from the International Union of the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology, Division of History of Science and Technology (IUHPST/DHST).