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City Views in the Habsburg and Medici Courts

Depictions of Rhetoric and Rule in the Sixteenth Century

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Ryan E. Gregg

In City Views in the Habsburg and Medici Courts, Ryan E. Gregg relates how Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor, and Duke Cosimo I of Tuscany employed city view artists such as Anton van den Wyngaerde and Giovanni Stradano to aid in constructing authority. These artists produced a specific style of city view that shared affinity with Renaissance historiographic practice in its use of optical evidence and rhetorical techniques. History has tended to see city views as accurate recordings of built environments. Bringing together ancient and Renaissance texts, archival material, and fieldwork in the depicted locations, Gregg demonstrates that a close-knit school of city view artists instead manipulated settings to help persuade audiences of the truthfulness of their patrons’ official narratives.
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Ambrogio Leone's De Nola, Venice 1514

Humanism and Antiquarian Culture in Renaissance Southern Italy

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This volume offers the first comprehensive study of the De Nola (Venice 1514), a hitherto underestimated Latin work written by the Nolan humanist and physician Ambrogio Leone. Furnished by four pioneering engravings made with the help of the Venetian artist Girolamo Mocetto, the De Nola is an impressively rich and multifaceted text, which contains an antiquarian (and celebrative) study of the city of Nola, in the Kingdom of Naples. By describing antiquities, inscriptions, buildings, but also social and religious aspects, the De Nola offers a precious insight of a southern Italy centre in the Renaissance, and constitutes a refined example of 16th century antiquarianism. The work is analysed through an multidisciplinary approach, encompassing art and architecture history, antiquarianism, literature, social history, and anthropology.
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Bianca de Divitiis, Fulvio Lenzo and Lorenzo Miletti

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Volume-editor Bianca de Divitiis, Fulvio Lenzo and Lorenzo Miletti