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EUHORMOS is an international book series intended for monographs and collective volumes on classical antiquity. Specifically, it welcomes manuscripts related to the concept of ‘anchoring innovation’ by classical scholars of all disciplines from all over the world. All books will be published in Open Access (online) as well as in print.
The series publishes book-length studies (single-authored or edited) of ancient innovations and their societal perceptions and valuations, in particular in connection with their ‘anchoring’, the various ways in which ‘the new’ could (or could not) be connected to what was already familiar. ‘The new’ is not restricted to the technical or scientific domains, but can include the ‘new information’ imparted by speakers through linguistic means, literary innovation, political, social, cultural or economic innovation, and new developments in material culture.

EUHORMOS is one of the results of the Dutch so-called Gravitation Grant (2017), awarded to a consortium of scholars from OIKOS, the National Research School in Classical Studies. See https://www.ru.nl/oikos/anchoring-innovation.

EUHORMOS is the Homeric term for a harbour ‘in which the anchoring is good’. Under this auspicious title, we aim to publish a book series striving to afford ‘good anchorage’ to studies contributing to a better understanding of ‘anchoring innovation’ in Greco-Roman Antiquity.

For sending your proposal or submitting manuscripts for the series, please contact Brill’s Assistant Editor for Classical Studies, Giulia Moriconi.
In: Mnemosyne
In: Mnemosyne
Author: Guy Walker

Abstract

Although scholarship has identified multiple ironic elements throughout Theocritus’ Idyll 18, his epithalamium for Helen, this paper offers a new perspective on Theocritus’ ambiguity, his allusive puns, and his ironic comparisons that masquerade as generic hymeneal topoi. Additionally, the embedded aetiology of Helen’s tree-cult has long eluded interpretation. This paper proposes a metapoetic reading for the plane-tree and its arboreal inscription. As a mise en abyme, it forms a metatextual link between the imagined internal reader and the external audience to reflect on the power of the author and the text over the reader.

In: Mnemosyne
Author: Dylan James

Abstract

The use of ὀνοµαζόµενα at Arr. Ind. 27.1 continues to puzzle scholars. This article uses the textual debate as a jumping-off point to explore Nearchus’ presentation of naval guides and their role on Alexander’s expedition, something which previous interpretations of the passage have not adequately considered. Through examination of all Nearchan fragments, I argue that providing local place names was a key aspect of a guide’s role and significant for navigation. It is also suggested that the use of this verb may additionally refer to the Macedonians’ practice of giving places new names or altering indigenous names; in this section, comparative material from New World conquest is brought to bear on the ancient evidence. In light of this analysis, I conclude that the manuscript reading of ὀνοµαζόµενα should be retained.

In: Mnemosyne
Author: Marta Fogagnolo
SGG 2 offers a commented critical edition of the preserved textual fragments from the Homeric studies of the Greek scholar-poet Antimachus of Colophon (floruit ca. 400 bce). If as an epic and elegiac poet Antimachus was a forerunner of the Alexandrian docta poesis, he was also an editor and scholar of Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey, producing an ekdosis of both poems (the first among the so-called kat’andra ‘editions’) and a syngramma, i.e. monograph, in which he dealt with biographical, exegetical and glossographical issues.

Abstract

A number of ancient texts ascribe to the well-known sophist Prodicus a theory concerning the rise of religion according to which early men came to regard and worship as gods all kinds of things useful to life. Modern scholars often claim that Prodicus also envisaged a second stage during which inventors of useful things came to be considered divine. The evidence adduced is a passage from Philodemus’ On Piety, which is then, more or less explicitly, considered superior to the other testimonies. The Stoic philosopher Persaeus is here reported to have briefly sketched and endorsed Prodicus’ theory in one of his works. However, a thorough syntactical analysis of the passage reveals that it confirms the rest of the evidence. The second stage obviously alluded to in the damaged text of the papyrus is without doubt ascribed to Persaeus himself.

In: Mnemosyne

Abstract

Suetonius’ biography of Caligula contains two mentions of the sacrifice of exotic birds: at Cal. 22.3 a range of them are sacrificed to the emperor and at Cal. 57.4 Caligula sacrifices a flamingo. By setting these references within the larger context of Roman sacrifice, this article argues that these sacrifices should be considered perverted acts. They form part of Suetonius’ strategy of depicting Caligula’s religious activities as an aberration. Looking beyond Suetonius’ text, the bird sacrifices prompt wider questions about the nature of the Cult of Caligula and about what constitutes an appropriate sacrifice in the Roman world.

In: Mnemosyne