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Discourses of Pistis in the Graeco-Roman World
The notion of faith experienced a remarkable surge in popularity among early Christians, with Paul as its pioneer. Yet what was the wider cultural significance of the pistis word group? This comprehensive work contextualizes Paul’s faith language within Graeco-Roman cultural discourses, highlighting its semantic multifariousness and philosophical potential. Based on an innovative combination of cognitive linguistics and discourse analysis, it explores ‘faith’ within social, political, religious, ethical, and cognitive contexts. While challenging modern individualist and irrational conceptualizations, this book shows how Paul uses pistis to creatively configure philosophical narratives of his age and propose Christ as its ultimate embodiment
Plotinus’ Ennead III.7 is a treatise concerning the journey of the human soul first descending into time and then reclaiming its original identity in eternity. The treatise also conceives eternity as the key which grants access to the forms, and time as the portal through which the soul enters the physical universe. Plotinus supports his analysis by drawing upon a rich philosophical tradition including the thought of Plato, Aristotle, the Stoics, Epicureans, Peripatetics and Pythagoreans. This book contains an extensive introduction, alongside the Oxford Classical Text of III.7, a translation, and a line-by-line commentary to guide the reader through the text.
This commentary series aims to make Philo’s thought accessible to readers such as graduate students who are just beginning to read him, but also contains much material that will be of interest to specialists in Hellenistic Judaism, ancient philosophy and patristic literature.

The series published an average of one volume per year over the last five years.
Studies in Ancient Philosophy
Philosophia Antiqua is the leading series specializing in books on Ancient Philosophy, covering the entire history of the subject from the Presocratics through Plato, Aristotle and the Stoics to the Neoplatonists of late Antiquity. The series has recently tended to emphasize areas that once used to be under-represented in the literature, for example Hellenistic philosophy, the skeptical tradition, Galen and other non-Platonist authors of later Antiquity, but this merely reflects a shifting focus in the field and is not a matter of deliberate policy. The over-riding concern of the series is to promote scholarship of the highest quality and originality, publishing work specifically oriented towards texts (editions, commentaries, translations), but also monographs, including both those that offer new readings of familiar – or less familiar – texts and those that explore the intersections between ancient and modern topics and approaches. Volumes are published in English, French and German. The series includes edited volumes that show a clear and coherent focus, but does not normally host Festschriften or Memorial volumes.
Scholarly discussions of historical and textual aspects of classical and medieval European philosophy.
Une étude sur l’expérience de pensée du Timée
Author:
Ce livre propose une nouvelle interprétation du Timée de Platon dans laquelle le mythe cosmologique est identifié à une expérience de pensée. Le discours de Timée nous demande ce que nous ferions si nous étions un artisan divin chargé de façonner l'univers en conférant de l'ordre à un milieu chaotique. Après avoir adopté trois critères à satisfaire pour appartenir à la catégorie de l’expérience de pensée (1 : contrefactualité ; 2 : nécessité de la production d’images ; 3 : progrès cognitif), il est défendu que le discours de Timée contient à la fois une séquence d'arguments déductifs et la possibilité de combiner ces arguments en différents modèles mentaux de l'univers.

This book offers a new interpretation of Plato’s Timaeus in which the cosmological myth is identified with a thought experiment. Timaeus’ discourse asks us what we would do if we were a divine craftsman in charge of fashioning the universe by bestowing order upon a chaotic milieu. After having adopted three criteria to be satisfied to belong to the category of thought experiment (1: counterfactuality; 2: necessity of image productions; 3: cognitive progress), it is defended that Timaeus’ speech contains both a sequence of deductive arguments and the possibility to combine these arguments into different mental models of the universe.
Volume Editor:
The volume consists of six papers that propose new approaches to the study of fragmentary Hesiodic epic. They explore interpretive questions referring not only to the better-studied Catalogue of Women and the Aspis, but also to rather neglected epics such as the Megalai Ehoiai, the Melampodia, and the Marriage of Ceyx. In addition, a fair number of the papers included in this volume question the order of the Hesiodic fragments adopted in the edition of R. Merkelbach and M. L. West.
Brill's Annotated Bibliographies is a series offering a new set of bibliographical tools in the Classics. We welcome proposals for volumes in this series. The bibliographies would be up to 500 pp. in length and in English. Each volume should provide an exhaustive survey of the authoritative text editions, commentaries, translations, concordances, surveys and electronics tools, important or influential items of the secondary literature (indicating their position and impact in current debate). They should fill a need for scholars active in other (not necessarily adjacent) fields who require a quick and reliable access to the literature of the theme of the bibliography and would be of use to university teachers in preparing customised bibliographies for their students. Ideally, the bibliographies should also call attention to important Italian, German or French works, which are often overlooked by English-speaking students and even scholars.

The contents of most bibliographies will be as follows:
- a general introduction, outlining where possible the development of scholarship on the theme
- the bare facts: title, author, year of publication, type of work (article, book, etc.), size, publisher
- some description of the contents of the work
- an evaluation (in a minority of cases)
- a subject index (cf. Brisson's Plato bibliography in Lustrum)

Editor:
From the Greeks to the Arabs and Beyond written by Hans Daiber, is a six volume collection of Daiber’s scattered writings, journal articles, essays and encyclopaedia entries on Greek-Syriac-Arabic translations, Islamic theology and Sufism, the history of science, Islam in Europe, manuscripts and the history of oriental studies. The collection contains published (since 1967) and unpublished works in English, German, Arabic, Persian and Turkish, including editions of Arabic and Syriac texts. The publication mirrors the intercultural character of Islamic thought and sheds new light on many aspects ranging from the Greek pre-Socratics to the Malaysian philosopher Naquib al-Attas. A main concern is the interpretation of texts in print or in manuscripts, culminating in two catalogues (Vol. V and VI), which contain descriptions of newly discovered, mainly Arabic, manuscripts in all fields.
Vol. I: Graeco-Syriaca and Arabica.
Vol. II: Islamic Philosophy.
Vol. III: From God’s Wisdom to Science: A. Islamic Theology and Sufism; B. History of Science.
Vol. IV: Islam, Europe and Beyond: A. Islam and Middle Ages; B. Manuscripts – a Basis of Knowledge and Science; C. History of the Discipline; D. Obituaries; E. Indexes.
Vol. V: Unknown Arabic Manuscripts from Eight Centuries – Including one Hebrew and Two Ethiopian Manuscripts: Daiber Collection III.
Vol. VI: Arabic, Syriac, Persian and Latin Manuscripts on Philosophy, Theology, Science and Literature. Films and Offprints: Daiber Collection IV.