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In recent years, storage has come to the fore as a central aspect of ancient economies. However studies have hitherto focused on urban and military storage. Although archaeological excavations of rural granaries are numerous, their evidence has yet to be fully taken into account. Such is the ambition of Rural granaries in northern Gaul (sixth century BC – fourth century AD). Focusing on northern Gaul, this volume starts by discussing at length the possibility of quantifying storage capacities and, through them, agrarian production. Building on this first part, the second half of the book sketches the evolution of rural storage in Gaul from the Iron Age to Late Antiquity, setting firmly archaeological evidence in the historical context of the Roman Empire.
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Roman Turdetania

Romanization, Identity and Socio-Cultural Interaction in the South of the Iberian Peninsula between the 4th and 1st centuries BCE

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Roman Turdetania makes use of the literary and archeological sources to provide an updated state of knowledge from a postcolonial approach about the socio-cultural interaction processes and the subsequent romanisation of the populations in the southern Iberian Peninsula from the 4th to the 1st centuries BCE. The resulting communities shaped a new identity, hybrid and converging, resulting from the previous Phoenician–Punic substrate vigorously coexisting with the new Hellenistic-Roman imprint.
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Maarten van Heemskerck’s Rome

Antiquity, Memory, and the Cult of Ruins

Arthur J. Di Furia

This book presents the first sustained study of the stunning drawings of Roman ruins by Haarlem artist Maarten van Heemskerck (1498–1574; in Rome, 1532–ca. 1537). In three parts, Arthur J. Di Furia describes Van Heemskerck’s pre-Roman training, his time in Rome, and his use his ruinscapes for the art he made during his forty-year post-Roman phase.
Building on the methods of his predecessors, Van Heemskerck mastered a dazzling array of methods to portray Rome in compelling fashion. Upon his return home, his Roman drawings sustained him for the duration of his prolific career. Maarten van Heemskerck’s Rome concludes with the first ever catalog to bring together all of Van Heemskerck’s ruin drawings in state-of-the-art digital photography.
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Eris vs. Aemulatio

Valuing Competition in Classical Antiquity

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Competition is everywhere in antiquity. It took many forms: the upper class competed with their peers and with historical and mythological predecessors; artists of all kinds emulated generic models and past masterpieces; philosophers and their schools vied with one another to give the best interpretation of the world; architects and doctors tried to outdo their fellow craftsmen. Discord and conflict resulted, but so did innovation, social cohesion, and political stability. In Hesiod's view Eris was not one entity but two, the one a “grievous goddess,” the other an “aid to men.” Eris vs. Aemulatio examines the functioning and effect of competition in ancient society, in both its productive and destructive aspects.
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The Art Market in Rome in the Eighteenth Century

A Case Study on the Social History of Art

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Enquiries on the economic aspects of art represent a modern frontier in art history. The topic goes well beyond the cost of a single object. Discoveries about the demands, intermediaries and clientele of the arts produced substantial advancement in the research, particularly of the 'social history of the art'. Eighteenth-century Rome offers a privileged field of action, given the permanence of the remarkable investments by the local ruling class, as well as the decisive development of external demand, largely linked to the Grand Tour.This book, the result of collaboration between international specialists, brings back into the spotlight protagonists, facts and dynamics that have remained unexplored for many years.
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Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, Collection of Mediterranean Antiquities, Vol. 3, The Metal Objects and the Gems

Musée des beaux-arts de Montréal, La collection des antiquités, Vol 3. Les objets de metal et les gemmes

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This is the third out of eight projected volumes making available to the public the contents in the collection of Greek and Roman Antiquities in one of Canada’s most prestigious museums. Here are presented a variety of metal objects (mostly bronze figurines, medical instruments, brooches, weaponry and a lead sarcophagus), the small collection of jewelry and the ancient gems and seal stones (mainly Roman) some still set in rings.
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The Cult of Mithras in Late Antiquity

Development, Decline and Demise ca. A.D. 270-430

David Walsh

In The Cult of Mithras in Late Antiquity David Walsh explores how the cult of Mithras developed across the 3rd and 4th centuries A.D. and why by the early 5th century the cult had completely disappeared. Contrary to the traditional narrative that the cult was violently persecuted out of existence by Christians, Walsh demonstrates that the cult’s decline was a far more gradual process that resulted from a variety of factors. He also challenges the popular image of the cult as a monolithic entity, highlighting how by the 4th century Mithras had come to mean different things to different people in different places.
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In Individuals and Materials in the Greco-Roman Cults of Isis Valentino Gasparini and Richard Veymiers present a collection of reflections on the individuals and groups which animated one of Antiquity’s most dynamic, significant and popular religious phenomena: the reception of the cults of Isis and other Egyptian gods throughout the Hellenistic and Roman worlds. These communities, whose members seem to share the same religious identity, for a long time have been studied in a monolithic way through the prism of the Cumontian category of the “Oriental religions”. The 26 contributions of this book, divided into three sections devoted to the “agents”, their “images” and their “practices”, shed new light on this religious movement that appears much more heterogeneous and colorful than previously recognized.
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Written by an international cast of experts, The Materiality of Text showcases a wide range of innovative methodologies from ancient history, literary studies, epigraphy, and art history and provides a multi-disciplinary perspective on the physicality of writing in antiquity. The contributions focus on epigraphic texts in order to gauge questions of their placement, presence, and perception: starting with an analysis of the forms of writing and its perception as an act of physical and cultural intervention, the volume moves on to consider the texts’ ubiquity and strategic positioning within epigraphic, literary, and architectural spaces. The contributors rethink modern assumptions about the processes of writing and reading and establish novel ways of thinking about the physical forms of ancient texts.
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Ancient Greek Ekphrasis: Between Description and Narration

Five Linguistic and Narratological Case Studies

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Niels Koopman

In Ancient Greek Ekphrasis: Between Description and Narration Niels Koopman offers a thorough linguistic and narratological analysis of five canonical ancient Greek ekphraseis from the archaic to the Hellenistic period: Achilles’ shield in Homer’s Iliad (18.478-608), Heracles’ shield in pseudo-Hesiod’s Shield (139-320), the goatherd’s cup in Theocritus’ first Idyll (27-60), Jason’s cloak in Apollonius Rhodius’ Argonautica (1.721-68) and Europa’s basket in Moschus’ Europa (37-62). Ekphrasis, as the verbal representation of visual representation, is both text and image, which makes it a complex yet fascinating phenomenon. By investigating its descriptive and narrative properties, this study sheds light on the interplay between text and image at work in ekphrasis.