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Author: Gaëlle Tallet
Que viennent faire les rayons solaires du dieu grec Hélios sur le front d’un dieu crocodile égyptien ? Cette question est au point de départ d’une enquête au cœur de la plasticité du système polythéiste de l’Égypte gréco-romaine. Parcourant le labyrinthe des diverses communautés et croyances grecques et égyptiennes, Gaëlle Tallet utilise le fil d’Ariane de la production des images religieuses, réponses à de nouveaux besoins et de nouvelles perceptions du divin, et ouvre les portes des ateliers où elles ont été conçues, commandées et façonnées. La Splendeur des dieux propose une réévaluation du rôle des clergés et des artistes indigènes dans l’élaboration d’un hellénisme proprement égyptien, qui leur a permis de promouvoir et préserver des traditions millénaires.

Why are the rays of the Greek god Helios on the forehead of a crocodile-headed Egyptian deity? Navigating the maze of Greek and Egyptian communities and creeds, Gaëlle Tallet investigates the plasticity of material culture in the polytheistic context of Graeco-Roman Egypt. Using the Ariadne’s thread of the manufacturing of new images, suitable to new needs and new understandings of the divine, La Splendeur des dieux opens the doors of the workshops where these images were designed, ordered and crafted. Tallet offers a full re-appraisal of the cultural balance of powers in Graeco-Roman Egypt, depicting the indigenous clergies and artists as integratedactors of an Egyptian Hellenicity that helped promote and preserve their millenaries-old traditions.
In The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus Thomas R. Henderson provides a new history of the Athenian ephebeia, a system of military, athletic, and moral instruction for new Athenian citizens. Characterized as a system of hoplite training with roots in ancient initiation rituals, the institution appears here as a later Lykourgan creation with the aim of reinvigorating Athenian civic culture. This book also presents a re-evaluation of the Hellenistic phase of the ephebeia, which has been commonly regarded as an institution in decline. Utilizing new epigraphic material, the author demonstrates that, in addition to rigorous military training, the ephebeia remained an important institution and played a vital and vibrant part of Athenian civic life.
Author: Sara Saba
The diplomatic tool known as isopolity is a testament to Greek ingenuity and is attested all over the Mediterranean from the 4th to 1st century B.C., mainly epigraphically. “Isopoliteia” was a popular way to establish new relashionships, reinforce old ones or to regulate difficult situations among communities in the Hellenistic Period. This book offers close scrutiny of potential citizenship between communities as well as a fresh examination of new evidence which has emerged since the publication of the only monograph written on the topic by Wilfried Gawantka in 1975. The book brings together all the evidence for isopolity in the Hellenistic world and demonstrates that communities used this diplomatic tool across different kinds of agreements and through a range of different ways.
In: Isopoliteia in Hellenistic Times
In: Isopoliteia in Hellenistic Times
In: Isopoliteia in Hellenistic Times
In: Isopoliteia in Hellenistic Times
In: Isopoliteia in Hellenistic Times
In: Isopoliteia in Hellenistic Times
In: Isopoliteia in Hellenistic Times