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Landscape, Tradition and Power in Medieval Iceland

Dalir and the Eyjafjörður region c.870-c.1265

Chris Callow

Chris Callow’s Landscape, Tradition and Power critically examines the evidence for socio-political developments in medieval Iceland during the so-called Commonwealth period. The book compares regions in the west and north-east of Iceland because these regions had differing human and physical geographies, and contrasting levels of surviving written evidence. Callow sets out the likely economies and institutional frameworks in which political action took place. He then examines different forms of evidence – the Contemporary sagas, Landnámabók (The Book of Settlements), and Sagas of Icelanders – considering how each describes different periods of the Commonwealth present political power. Among its conclusions the book emphasises stasis over change and the need to appreciate the nuances and purposes of Iceland’s historicising sagas.
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Imitationen

Systematische Zugänge zu einem kulturellen Prinzip des Mittelalters

Edited by Michael Grünbart, Gerald Schwedler and Jörg Sonntag

Imitation und Mimesis sind epochenübergreifende Kulturphänomene. Doch wie erkennt, analysiert oder bewertet man das Imitieren im Mittelalter? Der Band präsentiert unterschiedliche fachdisziplinäre Methoden und Ansätze und erläutert diese an einschlägigen Beispielen.
Imitieren kann für das Mittelalter als bislang unterschätzte, höchst komplexe Kulturtechnik angesehen werden, deren Potential nicht nur darin lag, Traditionen zu konservieren, sondern durchaus Innovationen hervorzubringen.

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Florin Curta

This book provides a comprehensive synthesis of scholarship on Eastern Europe in the Middle Ages. The goal is to offer an overview of the current state of research and a basic route map for navigating an abundant historiography available in more than 10 different languages. The literature published in English on the medieval history of Eastern Europe—books, chapters, and articles—represents a little more than 11 percent of the historiography. The companion is therefore meant to provide an orientation into the existing literature that may not be available because of linguistic barriers and, in addition, an introductory bibliography in English.
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Cristian Bratu

In L’affirmation de soi chez les historiens, Cristian Bratu discusses authorial self-representations and self-promotion strategies in the works of ancient and medieval historians, from Herodotus (5th c. BC) to Philippe de Commynes (15th c. AD). After describing the emergence of an author figure in the works of ancient Greek and Roman historians, Bratu shows that, in spite of the emphasis placed by the nascent Christian civilization on humility, medieval historians were anything but self-effacing. Subsequently, he focuses on the authorial figures of French medieval historians who wrote in the vernacular between the 12th and 15th centuries. Bratu uses a variety of approaches (philology, codicology, narratology) in order to shed new light on the authorial figures of ancient and medieval historians.

Dans L’affirmation de soi chez les historiens, Cristian Bratu étudie la figure de l’auteur dans les œuvres des historiens antiques et médiévaux, d’Hérodote (Ve siècle av. J.-C.) à Philippe de Commynes (XVe siècle ap. J.-C.). Après une section dédiée à l’émergence d’une figure d’auteur chez les historiens de l’Antiquité gréco-romaine, Bratu montre que malgré l’importance accordée à l’humilité dans la civilisation chrétienne naissante, les historiens médiévaux furent tout sauf modestes. Cette étude se concentre ensuite sur les figures des historiens de langue française entre le XIIe et le XVe siècle. En s’appuyant sur différentes méthodes (philologie, codicologie, narratologie), Cristian Bratu apporte un éclairage nouveau sur la figure de l’auteur chez les historiens antiques et médiévaux.
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Edited by Jennifer Saltzstein

In Musical Culture in the World of Adam de la Halle, contributors from musicology, literary studies, history, and art history provide an account of the works of 13th-century composer Adam de la Halle, one of the first named authors of medieval vernacular music for whom a complete works manuscript survives. The essays illuminate Adam’s generic transformations in polyphony, drama, debate poetry, and other genres, while also emphasizing his place in a large community of trouvères active in the bustling urban environment of Arras. Exploring issues of authorship and authority, tradition and innovation, the material contexts of his works, and his influence on later generations, this book provides the most complete and up-to-date picture available in English of Adam’s œuvre.
Contributors are Alain Corbellari, Mark Everist, Anna Kathryn Grau, John Haines, Anne Ibos-Augé, Daniel E. O’Sullivan, Judith A. Peraino, Isabelle Ragnard, Jennifer Saltzstein, Alison Stones, Carol Symes, and Eliza Zingesser.
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Investigations in Medieval Stained Glass

Materials, Methods, and Expressions

Edited by Brigitte Kurmann-Schwarz and Elizabeth Pastan

With many excellent books on medieval stained glass available, the reader of this anthology may well ask: “what is the contribution of this collection?” In this book, we have chosen to step away from national, chronological, and regional models. Instead, we started with scholars doing interesting work in stained glass, and called upon colleagues to contribute studies that represent the diversity of approaches to the medium, as well as up-to-date bibliographies for work in the field.

Contributors are: Wojciech Balus, Karine Boulanger, Sarah Brown, Elizabeth Carson Pastan, Madeline H. Caviness, Michael W. Cothren, Francesca Dell’Acqua, Uwe Gast, Françoise Gatouillat, Anne Granboulan, Anne F. Harris, Christine Hediger, Michel Hérold, Timothy B. Husband, Alyce A. Jordan, Herbert L. Kessler, David King, Brigitte Kurmann-Schwarz, Claudine Lautier, Ashley J. Laverock, Meredith P. Lillich, Isabelle Pallot-Frossard, Hartmut Scholz, Mary B. Shepard, Ellen M. Shortell, Nancy M. Thompson.
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Trends and Turning Points

Constructing the Late Antique and Byzantine World

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Edited by Matthew Kinloch and Alex MacFarlane

Trends and Turning Points presents sixteen articles, examining the discursive construction of the late antique and Byzantine world, focusing specifically on the utilisation of trends and turning points to make stuff from the past, whether texts, matter, or action, meaningful. Contributions are divided into four complementary strands, Scholarly Constructions, Literary Trends, Constructing Politics, and Turning Points in Religious Landscapes. Each strand cuts across traditional disciplinary boundaries and periodisation, placing historical, archaeological, literary, and architectural concerns in discourse, whilst drawing on examples from the full range of the medieval Roman past. While its individual articles offer numerous important insights, together the volume collectively rethinks fundamental assumptions about how late antique and Byzantine studies has and continues to be discursively constructed.

Contributors are: David Barritt, Laura Borghetti, Nikolas Churik, Elif Demirtiken, Alasdair C. Grant, Stephen Humphreys, Mirela Ivanova, Hugh Jeffery, Valeria Flavia Lovato, Francesco Lovino, Kosuke Nakada, Jonas Nilsson, Theresia Raum, Maria Rukavichnikova and Milan Vukašinović.
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Edited by Wolfram Hörandner, Andreas Rhoby and Nikolaos Zagklas

This book offers the first complete overview of Byzantine poetry from the 4th to the 15th centuries. By bringing together 22 scholars, it explores the development of poetic trends and the interaction between poetry and society throughout the Byzantine millennium. Moreover, it discusses a wide range of issues concerning the writing and reading of poetry (such as style, language, metrics, function, and circulation). The volume focuses on the driving forces behind the vast verse production in Byzantium and beyond. It surveys a large number of texts and looks closely at their place within the social and cultural milieus of their authors. Overall, it aims to enhance our understanding of Byzantine poetry and shed light on its important place in Byzantine literary culture.

Contributors are: Eirini Afentoulidou, Gianfranco Agosti, Roderick Beaton, Floris Bernard, Carolina Cupane, Ivan Drpić, Kristoffel Demoen, Jürgen Fuchsbauer, Antonia Giannouli, Martin Hinterberger, Wolfram Hörandner, Elizabeth Jeffreys, Michael Jeffreys, Marc Lauxtermann, Ingela Nilsson, Emilie van Opstall, Andreas Rhoby, Kurt Smolak, Foteini Spingou, Maria Tomadaki, Ioannis Vassis, Nikos Zagklas.
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Edited by Carsten Jahnke

A Companion to Medieval Lübeck offers an introduction to recent scholarship on the vibrant and source-rich medieval history of Lübeck. Focusing mainly on the twelfth to fifteenth centuries, the volume positions the city of Lübeck within the broader history of Northern Germany and the Baltic Sea area. Thematic contributions highlight the archaeological and architectonical development of a northern town, religious developments, buildings and art in a Hanseatic city, and its social institutions. This volume is the first English-language overview of the history of Lübeck and a corrective to the traditional narratives of German historiography. The volume thus offers a fresh perspective on the history of medieval Lübeck—as well as a handy introduction to the riches of the Lübeck archives—to undergraduates, graduate students, and scholars in related fields.

Contributors are Manfred Finke, Hartmut Freytag, Antjekathrin Graßmann, Angela Huang, Carsten Jahnke, Ursula Radis, Anja Rasche, Dirk Rieger, Harm von Seggern and Ulf Stammwitz.
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Ingrid Falque

In Devotional Portraiture and Spiritual Experience Ingrid Falque analyses the meditative functions of early Netherlandish paintings including devotional portraits, that is portraits of people kneeling in prayer. Such paintings have been mainly studied in the context of commemorative and social practices, but as Ingrid Falque shows, they also served as devotional instruments.

By drawing parallels between the visual strategies of these paintings and texts of the major spiritual writers of the medieval Low Countries, she demonstrates that paintings with devotional portraits functioned as a visualisation of the spiritual process of the sitters. The books is accompanied by the first exhaustive catalogue of paintings with devotional portraits produced in the Low Countries between c. 1400 and 1550 (in a e-format).