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Author: Jos Moons SJ
While belief in God the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit is at the very core of the Christian faith, the significance of the Spirit in particular is sometimes overlooked in faith practice and theological reflection, resulting in what theologians call Geistvergessenheit. In this context, Lumen Gentium, one of the most important documents of the Second Vatican Council (1962-1965), is usually praised for its pneumatological renewal. The current volume, however, argues that this renewal is no more than modest. The Holy Spirit is still conceived of predominantly as an adjunct to Christ. To substantiate that claim, Jos Moons has developed a novel method of close reading on the basis of which he compares Lumen gentium’s conception of the Spirit to that of Mystici corporis (1943). He also analyses the redaction-historical development of the former and concludes with a plea to envisage the Spirit more boldly: as actively guiding the church, especially by means of the sensus fidelium, its charisms and the discernment of spirits.
Jesuit history from an alternative perspective
Étienne Pasquier (1529–1615) was a lawyer, royal official, man of letters, and historian. He represented the University of Paris in its 1565 suit to dislodge a Jesuit school from Paris. Despite royal support, the Jesuits remained in conflict with many institutions, which in 1595 expelled them from much of the realm. With ever-increasing polemics, Pasquier continued to oppose the Jesuits. To further his aims, he published a dialog between a Jesuit (almost certainly Louis Richeome) and a lawyer (Pasquier himself). He called it the Jesuits’ Catechism (1602). Pasquier’s work did not stop the French king from welcoming the Jesuits back. But Pasquier’s Catechism remained central to Jansenist and other anti-Jesuit agitation up to the Society’s 1773 suppression and beyond.
Manuscripts, Versions, and Transmission
Author: Vevian Zaki
In this study, Vevian Zaki places the Arabic versions of the Pauline Epistles in their historical context, exploring when, where, and how they were produced, transmitted, understood, and adapted among Eastern Christian communities across the centuries. She also considers the transmission and use of these texts among Muslim polemicists, as well as European missionaries and scholars. Underpinning the study is a close investigation of the manuscripts and a critical examination of their variant readings. The work concludes with a case study: an edition and translation of the Epistle to the Philippians from manuscripts London, BL, Or. 8612 and Vatican, BAV, Ar. 13; a comparison of the translation strategies employed in these two versions; and an investigation of the possible relations between them.
This volume explores the work of Anselm of Canterbury, theologian and archbishop, in light of the communities in which he participated. Featuring thirteen essays from leading historians, theologians, and literary scholars, the collection ranges from Anselm’s immediate contemporaries to the reception of his work, and formation of his posthumous reputation, by later medieval readers.

Individual essays consider the role of friendships in his career, his relations with students, correspondence with women, interventions in the political sphere, and influence as leader of the monastic communities at Bec and Canterbury. Together, these essays present a new profile of the archbishop, revealing an individual whose work emerged from a vibrant culture of debate, criticism, and collaboration.

Contributors are: Giles E. M. Gasper, Bernard van Vreeswijk, David Whidden, Hiroko Yamazaki, Bernd Goebel, Thomas Barrows, Hollie Devanney, Stephanie Britton, Sally Vaughn, George Younge, Christian Brouwer, Daniel Coman, Margaret Healy-Varley, and Severin Kitanov.
Editor: Luca Ferracci
A History of the Desire for Christian Unity is a multi-volume reference work on the history of ecumenism. The ecumenical movement is understood as a twentieth-century movement of European origin with a global reach. This reference work is a reconstruction of the arc of time in which the Christian churches transitioned from a position of hostility to one of dialogue, and from separation to forms of communion. Scholars across the continents and disciplines explore a history of individuals and groups, generations and assemblies, documents and programs, theologies and practices, all firmly placed within the framework of a desire for unity.

This first volume traces the long-term roots and reconstructs the historical, theological, and political junctures that marked the beginning of a distinctive movement that runs throughout the nineteenth and into the heart of the twentieth century.
Editor: Mike Humphreys
Few subjects have generated more argument in early medieval, Byzantine, and Orthodox history than Iconoclasm. Supposedly for more than a century the Orthodox Church and Byzantium were wracked by controversy over religious figural imagery, culminating in 843 in the establishment of icon veneration as a fundamental Orthodox practice. In this multidisciplinary Companion to Byzantine Iconoclasm, twelve contributors set the controversy in context and critically examine the key debates: what was the argument about? How much destruction and persecution were there? What caused and fuelled the controversy? What links, if any, were there to events in the Islamic Caliphate and the Latin West? And how can we use our contested literary and material sources to offer answers to these questions?