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Cultivation of Culture and the Global Circulation of Ideas
Through the concept of ‘Romantic nationalism’, this interdisciplinary global historical study investigates cultural initiatives in (British) India that aimed at establishing the nation as a moral community and which preceded or accompanied state-oriented political nationalism. Drawing on a vast array of sources, it discusses important Romantic nationalist traits, such as the relationship between language and identity, historicism, artistic revivalism and hero worship. Ultimately, this innovative book argues that because of the confrontation with European civilization and processes of modernization at large, cultivation of culture in British India was morally and spiritually more important to the making of the nation than in Europe.
New Voices in the History of Early Modern Education
Editor:
This volume offers a scholarly examination of educational history, highlighting the pivotal role of educational practices from the late medieval era to the early modern period. It provides a dynamic forum for emerging academics in the field, revealing fresh, multifaceted perspectives on the educational methods of this era. The work illuminates the sophisticated educational systems that shaped Renaissance Milan's merchants and the education of cantors in royal courts and cathedrals. Spanning from Brazil to India, it traces the extensive reach of Jesuit influence and reveals how their teachings fostered an early consciousness of a globally interconnected world in European education.

Contributors include Bradley Blankemeyer, Laura Madella, Jessica Ottelli, Federico Piseri, David Salomoni, and Carolina Vaz de Carvalho.
Capitalist Interests, State Regulations, and Left-Wing Strategies
Volume Editors: and
“Capital is moved to where low-wage labour is available, and migrants move – often in large numbers – to where investments and/or wealth accumulated due to specific historic factors create a demand for labour”. This volume explores this idea and contributes to the fields of global labour, working-class, and migration history by illuminating the lives of working people over the 19th and 20th centuries. The book's twenty authors discuss a wide range of topics, from capital investments in terms of the availability of low-wage labour and forced mobilization to gender discrimination.

Contributors are: Selda Altan, Beate Althammer, Nina Trige Andersen, Cecilia Bruzelius, Geoffrey Ewen, Katharine Frederick, Veronika Helfert, Dirk Hoerder, Ritesh Kumar Jaiswal, Dácil Juif, Radhika Kanchana, Leslie Page Moch, Lukas Neissl, Christof Parnreiter, Lucas Poy, Richard Saich, Mahua Sarkar, Lewis H. Siegelbaum, Yukari Takai, and Aliki Vaxevanoglou.
This is a full Open Access series. All volumes can be downloaded for free from the moment of publication and book publication charges are waived thanks to the funders mentioned below.

The growth of scholarship in the field of Jesuit studies continues to accelerate at an extraordinary rate. Staying current on a variety of subjects is becoming increasingly difficult for scholars, even within their own disciplines. This is even more true for students. In response to this trend, Brill Research Perspectives in Jesuit Studies publishes expert-written, peer reviewed and concise volumes on various thematic and geographical/chronological subjects. The series complements other Brill publications in the field, such as the Journal of Jesuit Studies, the Jesuit Studies book series, and the Jesuit Historiography Online.

Brill Research Perspectives in Jesuit Studies is published in Open Access thanks to generous support from the following institutions:

- Ateneo de Manila University, Quezon City, Philippines
- College of the Holy Cross, Worcester, Massachusetts (USA)
- Georgia Southern University, Statesboro, Georgia (USA)
- Jesuit Historical Institute in Africa, Nairobi, Kenya
- Le Moyne College, Syracuse, New York (USA)
- Saint Louis University, St. Louis, Missouri (USA)
- Santa Clara University, Santa Clara, California (USA)

Series Editor:
Maritime history is the history of mankind’s relation to the sea. The peer-reviewed Brill’s Studies in Maritime History welcomes studies on maritime history primarily international and comparative, with a global perspective. It regards maritime history as the history of the people who sail on the sea and live round the sea, that is, of littoral societies, of maritime regions, of seas and oceans, of the effects on land of man’s interaction with the sea. Maritime history is approached as widely as possible, as delineated by the important Dutch-Australian maritime historian Frank Broeze: it includes the use of the surface of the sea for transport and maritime business; the use of the resources of the sea and its subsoil; the use of the sea for power projection; the sea as an area for scientific exploration; the use of the sea for leisure activities; the use of the sea as an inspiration in culture and ideology. Maritime history offers the liberation of a borderless world in a synthesis of history and the social sciences, including economics, sociology, anthropology, linguistics and geography.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to either the series editor Gelina Harlaftis or the publisher at BRILL, Alessandra Giliberto.

Brill is in full support of Open Access publishing and offers the option to publish your monograph, edited volume, or chapter in Open Access. Our Open Access services are fully compliant with funder requirements. We support Creative Commons licenses. For more information, please visit Brill Open or contact us at openacess@brill.com.
Series Editors: and
As a practice in which human beings were held captive for an indefinite period of time, coerced into extremely dependent and exploitative power relationships, denied rights (including rights over their labor, lives, and bodies), often vulnerable to forced relocation by various means, and forced to labor against their will, slavery in one form or another predates written records and has existed in innumerable societies. This exciting series provides a venue for scholarly work—research monographs and edited volumes—that advances our understanding of the history of slavery and post-slavery in any period and any geographical region. It fills an important gap in academic publishing and builds upon two relatively recent developments in historical scholarship. First, it provides a world-class outlet for the increased scholarly interest shown in slavery studies in recent years, not only for those working on modern Atlantic societies but also other regions and time periods throughout world history. Second, this series intersects slavery studies with a growing interest in global history among researchers, including global migrations and interactions, warfare, trade routes, and economic expansion. Studies in Global Slavery welcomes submissions that deal with themes such as the development of slave societies and societies with slaves; human trafficking and forced migration; slavery and globalization; slave culture and cultural transfer; political, economic, and ideological causes and effects of slavery; resistance; abolition and emancipation; and memories/legacies of slavery.

Monographs by specialists in the field are especially sought, but multi-authored edited volumes containing academic articles by slavery scholars will also be considered. Manuscripts should be written in English and be at least 80,000 words in length (including footnotes and bibliography). Manuscripts may also include illustrations, tables, maps, and other visual material.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the publisher Jason Prevost. Please direct all other correspondence to Associate Editor Simona Casadio.

*A paperback edition of select titles in the series, for individual purchase only, will be released approximately 12 months after publication of the hardcover edition.

This series features research monographs, edited volumes, and translated works that advance understanding of societies in East Asia or of their interaction or comparison with those in other parts of the world. It seeks to go beyond traditional paradigms and notions and presents possibilities for new discourses. The modern era is broadly defined in this series as the period roughly from the fifteenth century onwards. The series welcomes discipline-specific, interdisciplinary, and comparative studies in humanities and social sciences that investigate various aspects of culture and society in the region as well as studies of global historical processes with specific reference to the region.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the publisher at BRILL, Stephanie Carta and Masja Horn.

Please see our Guidelines for a Book Proposal. All submissions are subject to a double-anonymous peer review process prior to publication.