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The focus of Through Your Eyes: Religious Alterity and the Early Modern Western Imagination is the (mostly Western) understanding, representation and self-critical appropriation of the "religious other" between the sixteenth and eighteenth centuries. Mutually constitutive processes of selfing/othering are observed through the lenses of creedal Jews, a bhakti Brahmin, a widely translated Morisco historian, a collector of Western and Eastern singularia, Christian missionaries in Asia, critical converts, toleration theorists, and freethinkers: in other words, people dwelling in an 'in-between' space which undermines any binary conception of the Self and the Other. The genesis of the volume was in exchanges between eight international scholars and the two editors, intellectual historian Giovanni Tarantino and anthropologist Paola von Wyss-Giacosa, who share an interest in comparatism, debates over toleration, and history of emotions.
Series Editors: Damian Alan Pargas and Jeff Fynn-Paul
As a practice in which human beings were held captive for an indefinite period of time, coerced into extremely dependent and exploitative power relationships, denied rights (including rights over their labor, lives, and bodies), often vulnerable to forced relocation by various means, and forced to labor against their will, slavery in one form or another predates written records and has existed in innumerable societies. This exciting series provides a venue for scholarly work—research monographs and edited volumes—that advances our understanding of the history of slavery and post-slavery in any period and any geographical region. It fills an important gap in academic publishing and builds upon two relatively recent developments in historical scholarship. First, it provides a world-class outlet for the increased scholarly interest shown in slavery studies in recent years, not only for those working on modern Atlantic societies but also other regions and time periods throughout world history. Second, this series intersects slavery studies with a growing interest in global history among researchers, including global migrations and interactions, warfare, trade routes, and economic expansion. Studies in Global Slavery welcomes submissions that deal with themes such as the development of slave societies and societies with slaves; human trafficking and forced migration; slavery and globalization; slave culture and cultural transfer; political, economic, and ideological causes and effects of slavery; resistance; abolition and emancipation; and memories/legacies of slavery.

Monographs by specialists in the field are especially sought, but multi-authored edited volumes containing academic articles by slavery scholars will also be considered. Manuscripts should be written in English and be at least 80,000 words in length (including footnotes and bibliography). Manuscripts may also include illustrations, tables, maps, and other visual material.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the publisher Jason Prevost. Please direct all other correspondence to Associate Editor Debbie de Wit.

*A paperback edition of select titles in the series, for individual purchase only, will be released approximately 12 months after publication of the hardcover edition.

Nicht nur in den kolonialen Macht- und Handelszentren, auch in der Provinz prägte dieWahrnehmung des Kolonialen den Alltag. So hat die deutsche Kolonialzeit auch in Westfalen und Lippe Spuren hinterlassen: Denkmäler und Straßen ehren koloniale Akteure,ethnographische Objekte in Museen erzählen von „exotischen“ Welten. Doch zwischenkolonialer und regionaler Geschichte gibt es noch viele weitere, bislang wenig beachtete Bezüge. Die Autorinnen und Autoren dieses mit zahlreichen Illustrationen versehenen Bandes stellen Aus- und Rückwirkungen des Kolonialismus auf das Leben in der westfälischen und lippischen Provinz vor: Die Verflechtungen westfälischer Städte mit dem kolonialen Handel, eine kritische Aufarbeitung von Biographien und Netzwerken kolonialer Akteure, die exotisierende und rassifizierende Zurschaustellung von Menschen sowie den Umgang mit Erinnerungsorten und Sammlungen.
Volume Editors: Raphael Schäfer and Anne Peters
What are the implications of writing the history of legal issues? Eighteen authors from different legal systems and backgrounds offer different answers, by examining the history writing on issues ranging from slavery over the use of force to extraterritorial jurisdiction. Contributions show how historiography has often distorted or neglected regional cultures and suggest alternative methods and approaches to history writing. These studies are highly relevant for current international relations in which the fight over master narratives is especially fierce among governments, in different academic fields, and also between governments and academics.

Contributors are: Jean d'Aspremont, Julia Bühner, Emiliano J.Buis, Maria Adele Carrai, Jacob Katz Cogan, Ríán Derrig, Angelo Dube, Michel Erpelding, Etienne Henry, Madeleine Herren, Randall Lesaffer, Anne-Charlotte Martineau, Parvathi Menon, Momchil Milanov, Hirofumi Oguri, Gustavo Prieto, Hendrik Simon, Sebastian Spitra, and Deborah Whitehall.
Merchants and Missionaries in 16th and 17th Century Japan
Author: Mihoko Oka
This book attempts to depict certain aspects of the Portuguese trade in East Asia in the 16th and 17th centuries by analyzing the activities of the merchants and Christian missionaries involved. It also discusses the response of the Japanese regime in handling the systemic changes that took place in the Asian seas. Consequently, it explains how Jesuit missionaries forged close ties with local merchants from the start of their activities in East Asian waters, and there is no doubt that the propagation of Christianity in Japan was a result of their cooperation. The author of this book attempted to combine the essence of previous studies by Japanese and western scholars and added several new findings from analyses of original Japanese and European language documents.
The International Propaganda Committee of Transport Workers and the International of Seamen and Harbour Workers, 1921–1937
Author: Holger Weiss
This volume investigates the ambition of the Red International of Labour Unions to radicalize the global waterfront during the interwar period. The main vehicle was the International Propaganda Committee of Transport Workers, replaced in 1930 by the International of Seamen and Harbour Workers as well as their agitation and propaganda centres, the International Harbour Bureaus and the International Seamen’s Clubs. The book scrutinizes their solidarity campaigns in support of local and national strikes as well as on their agitation against discrimination, segregation and racism within the unions, their demands to organize non-white maritime transport workers, and their calls for engagement in anti-fascist, anti-war and anti-imperialist actions.
The Peopling of the World from the Perspective of Language, Genes and Material Culture
This volume provides the most up-to-date and holistic but compact account of the peopling of the world from the perspective of language, genes and material culture, presenting a view from the Himalayas. The phylogeny of language families, the chronology of branching of linguistic family trees and the historical and modern geographical distribution of language communities inform us about the spread of languages and linguistic phyla. The global distribution and the chronology of spread of Y chromosomal haplogroups appears closely correlated with the spread of language families. New findings on ancient DNA have greatly enhanced our understanding of the prehistory and provenance of our biological ancestors. The archaeological study of past material cultures provides yet a third independent window onto the complex prehistory of our species.
This book offers an in-depth examination of the conflict of 1838 to 1840 between the Zulus and the Boers. Leśniewski reflects on the established historiography and reappraises some key conceptions of the war. The conflict has often been seen as a colonial war, with the Zulus cast into the role of either villains or victims. Drawing on written primary sources and Zulu oral tradition, the author instead argues that the war was a struggle between an established regional power aiming to defend and consolidate its position and an incoming power seeking land, settlement, and local supremacy.