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Immigrant and Ethnic-Minority Writers since 1945

Fourteen National Contexts in Europe and Beyond

This study analyses how immigrant and ethnic-minority writers have challenged the understanding of certain national literatures and have markedly changed them. In other national contexts, ideologies and institutions have contained the challenge these writers pose to national literatures. Case studies of the emergence and recognition of immigrant and ethnic-minority writing come from fourteen national contexts. These include classical immigration countries, such as Canada and the United States, countries where immigration accelerated and entered public debate after World War II, such as the United Kingdom, France and Germany, as well as countries rarely discussed in this context, such as Brazil and Japan. Finally, this study uses these individual analyses to discuss this writing as an international phenomenon.




Sandra R.G. Almeida, Maria Zilda F. Cury, Sarah De Mul, Sneja Gunew, Dave Gunning, Kristina Iwata-Weickgenannt, Martina Kamm, Liesbeth Minnaard, Maria Oikonomou, Wenche Ommundsen, Marie Orton, Laura Reeck, Daniel Rothenbühler, Cathy J. Schlund-Vials, Wiebke Sievers, Bettina Spoerri, Christl Verduyn, Sandra Vlasta.
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Fruits of Migration

Heterodox Italian Migrants and Central European Culture 1550-1620

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Migration is a problem of highest importance today, and likewise is its history. Italian migrants that had to leave the peninsula in the long sixteenth century because of their heterodox Protestant faith is a topic that has its deep roots in Italian Renaissance scholarship since Delio Cantimori: It became a part of a twentieth century form of Italian leyenda negra in liberal historiography. But its international dimension and Central Europe (not only Germany) as destination of that movement has often been neglected. Three different levels of connectivity are addressed: the materiality of communication (travel, printing, the diffusion of books and manuscripts); individual migrants and their biographies and networks; the cultural transfers, discourses, ideas migrating in one or in both directions.
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Translocal Connections across the Indian Ocean

Swahili Speaking Networks on the Move

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The book describes the worlds where Swahili is spoken as multi-centred contexts that cannot be thought of as located in a specific coastal area of Kenya or Tanzania. The articles presented discuss a range of geographical areas where Swahili is spoken, from Somalia to Mozambique along the Indian Ocean, in Europe and the US. In an attempt to de-essentialize the concepts of translocality and cosmopolitanism, the emphasis of the book is on translocality as experienced by different social strata and by gender and cosmopolitanism as an acquired attitude.

Contributors are: Katrin Bromber, Gerard van de Bruinhorst, Francesca Declich, Rebecca Gearhart Mafazy, Linda Giles, Ida Hadjivayanis, Mohamed Kassim, Kjersti Larsen, Mohamed Saleh, Maria Suriano, Sandra Vianello.
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Españoles en Europa

Identidad y Exilio desde la Edad Moderna hasta nuestros días

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Españoles en Europa: Identidad y Exilio desde la Edad Moderna a nuestros días focuses on exile as a great identifier of modern times. It constitutes a highly comprehensive view of Hispanic exile through a systematic, transnational and trans-historical perspective.

Exile has played an essential role within Europe, which is presented as a complex conglomerate of cultures and literary traditions in constant transformation and dialogue. In the particular case of Hispanic exile, an undeniable complexity arises throughout its history due to various political, economic, cultural and aesthetic factors and to the essential significance of absent figures in the formation of Hispanic culture and identity.

Españoles en Europea: Identidad y Exilio desde la Edad Moderna a nuestros días se concentra en el fenómeno del exilio como gran identificador de tiempos modernos, abordándolo sistemáticamente desde una innovadora perspectiva transnacional y transhistórica.

Europa se presenta como un complejo conglomerado de culturas y de tradiciones literarias en constante transformación y diálogo, donde el fenómeno del exilio ha desempeñado un papel esencial. En el caso particular del exilio hispánico, una clara complejidad se acentúa y agudiza a lo largo de su historia debido a diversos factores políticos, económicos, culturales y estéticos, siendo además innegable la influencia esencial que han tenido los ausentes en la formación de la cultura y la identidad del país.

Contributors: Beatriz Calvo Martín, Carlos Yebra López, Cristian Crusat, Dagmar Vandebosch, Isabel-Clara Lorda Vidal, Fernando Díaz Ruiz, Jorge L. Catalá-Carrasco, Kirsten Bakker, Konstantin Mierau, Manuel Aznar Soler, Manuel de la Fuente, María José González Dávila, Marije Hirstova.
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A Companion to Korean American Studies presents interdisciplinary works from a number of authors who have contributed to the field of Korean American Studies. This collection ranges from chapters detailing the histories of Korean migration to the United States to contemporary flows of popular culture between South Korea and the United States. The authors present on Korean American history, gender relations, cultural formations, social relations, and politics.

Contributors are: Sohyun An, Chinbo Chong, Angie Y. Chung, Rhoanne Esteban, Sue-Je Lee Gage, Hahrie Han, Jane Hong, Michael Hurt, Rachael Miyung Joo, Jane Junn, Miliann Kang, Ann H. Kim, Anthony Yooshin Kim, Eleana Kim, Jinwon Kim, Ju Yon Kim, Kevin Y. Kim, Nadia Y. Kim, Soo Mee Kim, Robert Ji-Song Ku, EunSook Lee, Se Hwa Lee, S. Heijin Lee, Shelley Sang-Hee Lee, John Lie, Pei-te Lien, Kimberly McKee, Pyong Gap Min, Arissa H. Oh, Edward J.W. Park, Jerry Z. Park, Josephine Nock-Hee Park, Margaret Rhee and Kenneth Vaughan.
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On account of its remarkable reach as well as its variety of schemes and features, migration in the Victorian era is a paramount chapter of the history of worldwide migrations and diasporas. Indeed, Victorian Britain was both a land of emigration and immigration. International Migrations in the Victorian Era covers a wide range of case studies to unveil the complexity of transnational circulations and connections in the 19th century. Combining micro- and macro-studies, this volume looks into the history of the British Empire, 19th century international migration networks, as well as the causes and consequences of Victorian migrations and how technological, social, political, and cultural transformations, mainly initiated by the Industrial Revolution, considerably impacted on people’s movements. It presents a history of migration grounded on people, structural forces and migration processes that bound societies together. Rather than focussing on distinct territorial units, International Migrations in the Victorian Era balances different scales of analysis: individual, local, regional, national and transnational.

Contributors are: Rebecca Bates, Sally Brooke Cameron, Milosz K. Cybowski, Nicole Davis, Anne-Catherine De Bouvier, Claire Deligny, Elizabeth Dillenburg, Nicolas Garnier, Trevor Harris, Kathrin Levitan, Véronique Molinari, Ipshita Nath, Jude Piesse, Daniel Renshaw, Eric Richards, Sue Silberberg, Ben Szreter, Géraldine Vaughan, Briony Wickes, Rhiannon Heledd Williams.
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Writers of Indian origin seldom appear in the South African literary landscape, although the participation of Indian South Africans in the anti-apartheid struggle was anything but insignificant. The collective experiences of violence and the plea for reconciliation that punctuate the rhythms of post-apartheid South Africa delineate a national script in which ethnic, class, and gender affiliations coalesce and patterns of connectedness between diverse communities are forged. Relations and Networks in South African Indian Writing brings the experience of South African Indians to the fore, demonstrating how their search for identity is an integral part of the national scene’s project of connectedness. By exploring how ‘Indianness’ is articulated in the South African national script through the works of contemporary South African Indian writers, such as Aziz Hassim, Ahmed Essop, Farida Karodia, Achmat Dangor, Shamim Sarif, Ronnie Govender, Rubendra Govender, Neelan Govender, Tholsi Mudly, Ashwin Singh, and Imraan Coovadia, along with the prison memoirists Dr Goonam and Fatima Meer, the book offers a theoretical model of South–South subjectivities that is deeply rooted in the Indian Ocean world and its cosmopolitanisms. Relations and Networks demonstrates convincingly the permeability of identity that is the marker of the Indian Ocean space, a space defined by ‘relations and networks’ established within and beyond ethnic, class, and gender categories.


CONTRIBUTORS
Isabel Alonso–Breto, M.J. Daymond, Felicity Hand, Salvador Faura, Farhad Khoyratty, Esther Pujolràs–Noguer, J. Coplen Rose, Modhumita Roy, Lindy Stiebel, Juan Miguel Zarandona
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Rhiannon Heledd Williams

Y Cyfaill o’r Hen Wlad (The Friend from the Old Country, 1838–1933) was the first Welsh-language periodical to succeed in the United States, and one of the longest lasting within the Welsh-American press. This paper looks at the strategies employed by its founder and first editor, William Rowlands, examining ways in which he created a literary sphere which appealed to Welsh-speaking Americans and supported the ways in which they were engaged in the processes of creating Welsh-language American culture. Looking specifically at religion, politics, language, literature and culture through a variety of narratives gives us a broad sense of the double-faceted Welsh-American identity in that period.

Although the monthly journal was considered to serve the Calvinistic Methodist denomination, it also contained a variety of news, education and cultural endeavours that strived to appeal to the nation as a whole. It also provided an open forum for discussion of social, political and cultural realms in their native tongue, ensuring they remain a distinct nation against the new backdrop of the United States. Immigrants from this minority nation created a new identity, as they entrenched themselves in their adopted landscape as American citizens, whilst maintaining a strong connection with the Old World and its values. This “transatlantic” connection was maintained through the aid of frequent correspondence and an array of literary contributions carried back and forth between both countries. These narratives combined portray a colourful insight into the migrants’ experiences of settlement, along with the features they considered central to the articulation of their multifarious national identity.

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Nicolas Garnier

The Victorian Era was marked by imperialism and remarkable territorial expansion. As a result of centuries of international conquest and cultural hegemony, the nineteenth century British world thus became an infinite and multifaceted world. The nineteenth century was also marked by ideologies that constructed the redundancy of some portions of the British population. Malthusian principles combined with the 1851 census data constructed female redundancy in the second half of the nineteenth century. Consequently, emigration societies organised the migration of “surplus” women to the British colonies, where educated women were needed. This geographical movement could also be of social and cultural nature since Victorian women were thus often offered better opportunities abroad.

The expansion of the British world during the era of New Imperialism also greatly impacted Evangelical societies which called for the international spreading of the Christian gospel. Overseas missions developed beyond Great Britain’s boundaries and offered further geographical opportunities to Victorian men, and more specifically to women. Single women, often deemed redundant by the British society, started to be accepted by missionary societies and some were sent to the remotest parts of the world. Such was the case for the women working for the China Inland Mission who were given geographical and social opportunities through their international evangelical work.

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Nicole Davis

Henry and Sophia Morwitch led urban lives in diverse cities of Europe and Australasia for a century from the 1830s to 1930s as part of mostly small Jewish Diasporas – a group with complex relationships to both the British Empire and colonies in which they settled. By the time of their return to England and subsequent deaths there in early decades of the twentieth-century they had become wealthy through commerce and property investment. This chapter examines their international and transcolonial migrations, travels, business ventures, and immersion in the urban environments of Britain, Europe and Australasia over a period of seventy years. It utilises the life story of one couple, which spanned great distances and spaces of time, in order to explore how migrant identities might develop in the urban settler colonial context. Their story lives illustrate the interconnectedness of the physical and social spaces of the nineteenth-century world through entwined networks created by ties of family, religion, commerce, political ideology, social groups and regional loyalties.