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Genocide, Civil War, and the Transformation of International Law
In Rwanda Revisited: Genocide, Civil War, and the Transformation of International Law, the contributing authors seek to recount, explore, and explain the tragedy that was the Rwanda genocide and the nature of the international community’s entanglement with it. Written by people selected for their personalized knowledge of Rwanda, be it as peacekeepers, aid workers, or members of the ICTR, and/or scholarship that has been clearly influenced by the genocide, this book provides a level of insight, detail and first-hand knowledge about the genocide and its aftermath that is clearly unique. Included amongst the writers are a number of scholars whose research and writings on Rwanda, the United Nations, and genocide are internationally recognized.

Contributors are: Major (ret’d) Brent Beardsley, Professor Jean Bou, Professor Jane Boulden, Dr. Emily Crawford, Lieutenant-General the Honourable Romeo Dallaire, Professor Phillip Drew, Professor Mark Drumbl , Professor Jeremy Farrall, Lieutenant-General John Frewen, Dr. Stacey Henderson, Professor Adam Jones, Ambassador Colin Keating, Professor Robert McLaughlin, Linda Melvern, Dr. Melanie O’Brien, Professor Bruce Oswald, Dr. Tamsin Phillipa Paige, Professor David J. Simon, and Professor Andrew Wallis.

This book was previously published as Special Issue of the Journal of International Peacekeeping, Volume 22 (2018), Issue 1-4 (published April 2020); with updated Introduction.
Series Editors: Jannemieke Ouwerkerk and André Klip
Scope and Aims
Launched in 2018, the European Criminal Justice Series provides a forum for high-quality scholarship on the European dimensions of crime, criminal law, criminal policy, and punishment. Publications in the series provide insight into how crime, criminal law and criminal justice is developing within the European Union and on the European continent, both from a legal and criminological perspectives. The series particularly welcomes monographs but is also open to edited volumes.

Information for Authors
Authors who are interested to publish in the European Criminal Justice Series, are invited to submit a proposal for consideration by the editorial board. For questions regarding the European Criminal Justice Series, or to submit a proposal, please contact the Editorial Board. The Editorial Board consists of the board members of the European Journal of Crime, Criminal Law and Criminal Justice, and two additional members. Each manuscript will be reviewed by the two editors-in-chief and by either one or two board members – depending on the topic and the required expertise.
This volume describes the procedures governing the transfer of sentenced foreign nationals from the United States to serve the remainder of their sentences in their native countries, and of United States nationals sentenced in foreign countries to serve the remainder of their sentences in the United States. It discusses the statutory and treaty framework regulating the transfer of sentenced persons to and from the United States, as well as the case law interpreting those statutes and treaties. Appendices contain United States statutes and regulations, U.S. Department of Justice Manual materials, and all treaties governing the transfer of prisoners to and from the United States.
In this book academic and police officer Erik van de Sandt researches the security practices of cyber criminals. While their protective practices are not necessarily deemed criminal by law, the countermeasures of cyber criminals frequently deviate from prescribed bona fide cyber security standards. This book is the first to present a full picture on these deviant security practices, based on unique access to confidential police sources related to some of the world's most serious and organized cyber criminals. The findings of this socio-technical-legal research prove that deviant security is an academic field of study on its own, and will help a non-technical audience to understand cyber security and the challenges of investigating cyber crime.
Author: Yudan Tan
In The Rome Statute as Evidence of Customary International Law, Yudan Tan offers a detailed analysis of topical issues concerning the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court as evidence of customary international law. The 1998 Rome Statute has generated a great deal of scholarly interest. Providing a novel way of analysing the treaty-custom interactions, Yudan Tan examines the customary status of essential parts of the Rome Statute. Based on a flexible two-element identification approach, focusing more on opinio juris, Yudan Tan convincingly argues that provisions of the Rome Statute were partly declaratory of custom when adopted in 1998, and that they are also partly declaratory of custom at the present time.
History, lex lata and Developments de lege ferenda
Author: Kathrin Strobel
This book presents the first comprehensive study of international criminal jurisdiction over organized crime. Taking into account a broad range of profit-generating crimes, including human trafficking, migrant smuggling, drug trafficking, and illicit trade in arms and ammunition, Strobel draws a concise picture of who can be prosecuted for what under which circumstances by analysing the current legal framework as defined by the Rome Statute, and by discussing future developments that could further facilitate such prosecutions.
Whereas international criminal law in the strict sense has long been considered not to apply to organized crime, Strobel convincingly demonstrates that international criminal prosecutions hold underexploited potential to bring leaders of cartels and trafficking rings to justice.
This ground-breaking volume provides analyses from experts around the globe on the part played by national and international law, through legislation and the courts, in advancing efforts to tackle climate change, and what needs to be done in the future. Published under the auspices of the British Institute of International and Comparative Law (BIICL), the volume builds on an event convened at BIICL, which brought together academics, legal practitioners and NGO representatives. The volume offers not only the insights from that event, but also additional materials, sollicited to offer the reader a more complete picture of how climate change litigation is evolving in a global perspective, highlighting both opportunities, and constraints. The contributions span a wide range of national jurisdictions with examples from both the Global South and the Global North. In addition, the potentialities and limitations for climate change-related cases at the regional and international levels are addressed, ranging from regional human rights courts and United Nations Treaty Bodies to the International Court of Justice, the World Trade Organization, the International Criminal Court and international arbitration. The volume will be of interest to legal scholars and legal practitioners, policy makers as well as activists and all those who are seeking to achieve change for the better in this field.