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Situating the Right to Citizenship within International and Regional Human Rights Law
This book offers a comprehensive analysis of the right to citizenship in international and regional human rights law. It critically reflects on the limitations of state sovereignty in nationality matters and situates the right to citizenship within the existing human rights framework. It identifies the scope and content of the right to citizenship by looking not only at statelessness, deprivation of citizenship or dual citizenship, but more broadly at acquisition, loss and enjoyment of citizenship in a migration context. Exploring the intersection of international migration, human rights law and belonging, the book provides a timely argument for recognizing a right to the citizenship of a specific state on the basis of one’s effective connections to that state according to the principle of jus nexi.
The European Yearbook of Minority Issues provides a critical and timely review of contemporary developments in minority-majority relations in Europe. It combines analysis, commentary and documentation in relation to conflict management, international legal developments and domestic legislation affecting minorities in Europe.

The European Yearbook of Minority Issues is also available online.

The handling managing editor for the Yearbook is Dr. Ljubica Djordjević. For further information please email her at: yearbook@ecmi.de
The Yearbook brings together a collection of studies that discuss legal problems raised by cultural differences between people and the law to which they are subject.
The International Yearbook for Legal Anthropology has been discontinued.
The Studies in International Minority and Group Rights series explores the rights of and situations facing minority persons and groups. It will provide a forum for the publication of monographs, postdoctoral research projects, other academic studies, conference reports, compilations of relevant documents and other materials that are likely to be of special interest to the readers of the Series.

The series published an average of two volumes per year over the last 5 years.
Editors-in-Chief: and
Studies in Polar Law publishes monographs and collected works devoted to the legal regimes applicable to the Arctic and the Antarctic. It explores the problems faced by these regions and the solutions proposed on issues such as the environment, sovereignty, dispute resolution, climate change, the rights of indigenous peoples, other human rights, good governance, wildlife, natural resources governance, law of the sea, land and resource claims in the Polar regions, self-determination and self-government, economic development, Arctic security, and the Arctic Council, the Antarctic treaty system and other relevant intergovernmental co-operation.
The Yearbook of Polar Law covers a wide variety of law and policy topics relating to the Arctic and the Antarctic, and even the Third Pole. Many of the articles draw on presentations made at the annual Symposiums on Polar Law. The Editors-in-Chief are Gudmundur Alfredsson of the Stefansson Arctic Institute in Akureyri and the China University of Political Science and Law in Beijing, Julia Jabour of the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies, University of Tasmania, Timo Koivurova of the Arctic Centre, University of Lapland, and Akiho Shibata of the Polar Cooperation Research Centre, Kobe University.

Articles published in the Yearbook are peer reviewed, unless otherwise noted. The Yearbook will also carry book reviews and occasional news stories.

The topics covered in the Yearbook include:
- human rights issues, such as autonomy, self-government and self-determination, the rights of indigenous peoples to land and natural resources, cultural rights and cultural heritage, and indigenous traditional knowledge
- local, national and corporate governance issues
- environmental law, climate change, security and human rights implications of climate change, protected areas and species, and biodiversity
- regulatory and management agreements and arrangements for marine environments, marine mammals, fisheries conservation and other biological/mineral/oil resources
- jurisdictional and other issues re the exploration, exploitation and shipping of oil, gas and minerals
- law of the sea, the retreating sea ice, and continental shelf claims
- trade law, potential shipping lines through the northwest and northeast passages, maritime law and transportation law
- territorial claims and border disputes on both land and at sea
- peace and security, and dispute settlement
- the roles and actual involvement of international organizations in the polar regions, such as the Arctic Council, the Nordic Council, the International Whaling Commission, the European Union, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, and the United Nations, and
- the activities of NGOs, think tanks and academic institutions


The Yearbook of Polar Law is also available online.
In this original and thought-provoking collection, the Editors provide a multilayered study of the "crime of crimes". Adopted in 1948, and based on Raphael Lemkin's idea, the definition of genocide belongs to the cornerstones of international criminal law and justice.
This volume focuses on, among other topics, the narrow scope of protected groups, wider domestic adaptations of the definition, denial of genocide, and current legal proceedings related to the crime in front of the ICJ and ICC. In this way its authors, based primarily in Central and Eastern Europe, analyse and discuss the readiness of the definition to meet the challenges of criminal justice in our changing world. The volume thus offers much fresh thinking on the international legal and legal policy complexities of genocide seventy years after the Genocide Convention's entry into force.
The European Yearbook of Minority Issues provides a critical and timely review of contemporary developments in minority-majority relations in Europe. It combines analysis, commentary and documentation in relation to conflict management, international legal developments and domestic legislation affecting minorities in Europe.
Part I contains scholarly articles and, the “special focus” section in this year’s volume is devoted to Covid-19 and minorities.
Part II contains reports on national and international developments.
Part III features book reviews introducing and critiquing new, relevant literature within the disciplines of the social sciences, humanities and law.

Apart from providing a unique annual overview of minority issues for both scholars and practitioners in this field, the Yearbook is an indispensable reference tool for libraries, research institutes as well as governments and international organisations.

The European Yearbook of Minority Issues is also available online.
Résultat d'un long travail de terrain, ce livre analyse les processus d’émergence du mouvement amazigh au Maroc et les dynamiques protestataires qui ont accompagné son évolution, des années 1960 à nos jours. En plaçant au centre de l'étude les transformations du phénomène protestataire au Maroc, il apporte un éclairage à la fois fascinant et inédit sur la question amazighe, ses causes, ses acteurs et ses formes, puis sur les enjeux identitaires portés par le mouvement amazigh dans la redéfinition de l'État-nation au Maroc.

This book, which represents the fruit of an extended field research, analyses the birth process of the Amazigh movement in Morocco and explores the dynamics of protests that have accompanied its growth from the 1960’s until today. Centred around the transformation of protests over time, this book introduces fresh and fascinating insights into the Amazigh question, its causes, its actors and the various shapes it has taken over the years, and sheds new light on the compelling identity issues that were raised by the Amazigh movement throughout Morocco’s redefinition of the Nation-State model.
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Editor / Translator:
Ethnic Minorities in Socialist China: Development, Migration, Culture, and Identity, edited by Dr. Han Xiaorong and translated into English by Zeng Qiang, presents nine articles written by Chinese scholars about the transformation of China’s ethnic minority groups in the socialist era. Focusing on seven of the 55 ethnic minorities in China, the nine articles cover four major themes: development, migration, culture and identity. These case studies are based on both fieldwork and written sources, and most authors make connections between their case studies and relevant social scientific theories. Peoples and places studied include the autonomous regions of Tibet and Inner Mongolia; the Hanni, Dai, and Bai peoples of Yunnan Province; Miao farmers of Yangjiang in Guangdong; and the Yi people of the Pearl River Delta region. These studies, which originally appeared in Open Times (开放时代), broadly reflect the concerns, interests and perspectives of the Chinese scholars involved in the study of China’s ethnic minorities.