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The dynamic processes of ordering we are witnessing around the world blend the extra-national with the national, the public with the private, the political and economic with the social and cultural. Issues of effectiveness, procedural and substantial justice, costs, incentives, voice, and inequality in these processes are growing in importance. This series aims to grasp these phenomena channeling them into the legal debate.

The series publishes books, authored or edited, covering various aspects of private, public, criminal, transnational and global law. The broad ambition of the series underlines the editors' belief that in the legal world there is a growing need to expand our knowledge of legal orders (national or supranational, official and unofficial), of their historical roots and of their practical dimensions.
Author: Anna Marotta
A Geo-Legal Approach to the English Sharia Courts: Cases and Conflicts adopts a new methodological perspective that combines Comparative Law with Geopolitics to understand the phenomenon of the English ‘sharia courts’. This term is used as a geopolitical representation of specific Islamic ADR institutions. The geo-legal analysis illustrates the competition of the legal systems involved and brings you in the middle of the related conflict, where (official and unofficial) legal rules are used by various actors to defend their ideas of Law and implement their strategies. Accordingly, the geo-legal operational analysis helps assess the possible changes occurring in the relationship between the legal systems and their substratum of values.
This contribution provides the important and timely bilingual version of the Chinese Civil Code and the Supreme People’s Court’s Judicial Interpretation of the Temporal Effect of the Civil Code. Providing translations by a diverse group of esteemed legal scholars, on Contract Law, Tort Law, Marriage, Family and Succession Law, General and Personality Provisions and Property Law, this unique resource will be important for all those with an interest in Chinese Law.
Volume Editors: Olivier Giraud and Michel Lallement
Decentering Comparative Analysis in a Globalizing World aims to go beyond the traditional criticism in comparative analysis. It wants to shed new light on the question of comparing as a form of categorizing. In this perspective, three relevant dimensions to question the naturalized categories of comparison are mobilized: ethnocentrism, the nation, and academic disciplines. Based on original empirical work, the volume proposes to use comparative categories by mixing and shifting the analytical perspectives. It brings together contributions that come to terms with the historicity of the comparative method in the social sciences. It eventually deals with the key issue of comparability of various cases, in the enlarged context of a globalizing world.

Contributors are: Anna Amelina, Camille Boullier, Catherine Cavalin, Serge Ebersold, Andreas Eckert, Mouhamedoune Abdoulaye Fall, Isabel Georges, Olivier Giraud, Aïssa Kadri, Wiebke Keim, Michel Lallement, Marie Mercat-Bruns, Luis Felipe Murillo, Kiran Klaus Patel, Léa Renard, Ferruccio Ricciardi, Paul-André Rosental, Pablo Salazar-Jaramillo, Stéphanie Tawa-Lama, Nikola Tietze, Tania Toffanin, Michel Vincent and Bénédicte Zimmermann.
Why do churches assist people without authorized residence even when the state prohibits and punishes such conduct? What does it mean for church-state relations when the church steps into the shoes (or perhaps on the feet) of the government? And are all levels of government on the same page when it comes to migration? These are just some of the questions that this book addresses.
In a world in which migration is an omnipresent reality, these issues pervade national borders, ethnic divides, and physical barriers. These issues are shared among all nations and peoples of this world, and deserve utmost attention as geopolitical contours continue to evolve.
The fast changing demographic, economic, legal, political and social developments in Asia have triggered a variety of research agendas that warrant a comparative interpretation of such phenomena. Brill’s Asian Law Series offers a unique platform for Western and Asian legal scholars and practitioners to exchange their perspectives on interdisciplinary questions that affect national societies, regional developments and international relations. Brill’s Asian Law Series pursues to be a qualitative and authoritative source of knowledge with regional focus that envisions a long-term relationship and dialogue between Western and Eastern institutes and cultures. Brill’s Asian Law Series enables a broad readership to compare and better understand the legal complexities faced in specific jurisdictions, legal systems, branches of law and contexts across Asia.
This book focuses on trend-setting judgments in different parts of the world that impacted on the rights of persons belonging to minorities and Indigenous people. The cases illustrate how the judiciary has been called upon to fill out the detail of minority protection arrangements and how, in doing so, in many instances the judiciary has taken the respective countries on a course that parliament may not have been able to navigate. In this book authors from various backgrounds in the practical application of minority protection arrangements investigate the role of the judiciary in constitutional arrangements aimed at the protection of the rights of minorities and Indigenous peoples.
Challenged Justice: In Pursuit of Judicial Independence is an academic continuation of the previous volumes on judicial Independence edited by Shimon Shetreet, with others: Jules Deschenes, Christopher Forsyth, and Wayne McCormack. All books were published by Brill Nijhoff: Judicial Independence: The Contemporary Debate (1985), The Culture of Judicial Independence: Conceptual Foundations and Practical Challenges (2012), The Culture of Judicial Independence: Rule of Law and World Peace (2014) and The Culture of Judicial Independence in a Globalised World (2016).
This book offers academic articles by distinguished jurists on judicial independence and judicial process in many jurisdictions including indicators of justice and analysis of international Standards on judicial independence and judicial ethics.
An International Human Rights Analysis
This book investigates the dynamics between international incitement prohibitions and international standards on freedom of religious speech, with a special focus on the potential incitement prohibitions for the protection of the rights of LGBT+ people. To that end, the book seeks to determine if and to what extent sexual orientation and gender identity are protected grounds under international anti-incitement law. Building on that analysis, the book also delves deeper into the particularly controversial and complex issue of religiously-motivated speech against LGBT+ people, a phenomenon engaging both religious speech rights and equality and other rights of LGBT+ people. Drawing on recent international law benchmarking in the area of incitement and complementing this with extensive comparative legal analysis, best practice lessons are presented on how to calibrate free religious expression and the protection of LGBT rights in the pluralist state. Among other findings, the present research rejects a sweeping a priori trump in the form of a ‘scripture defence’ against incitement charges, but rather recommends a context-based risk assessment of speech acts potentially affecting the rights of LGBT+ people.