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The fast changing demographic, economic, legal, political and social developments in Asia have triggered a variety of research agendas that warrant a comparative interpretation of such phenomena. Brill’s Asian Law Series offers a unique platform for Western and Asian legal scholars and practitioners to exchange their perspectives on interdisciplinary questions that affect national societies, regional developments and international relations. Brill’s Asian Law Series pursues to be a qualitative and authoritative source of knowledge with regional focus that envisions a long-term relationship and dialogue between Western and Eastern institutes and cultures. Brill’s Asian Law Series enables a broad readership to compare and better understand the legal complexities faced in specific jurisdictions, legal systems, branches of law and contexts across Asia.
The Chinese and Comparative Law Series is a refereed scholarly series dedicated to the publication of studies of Chinese law in English, including works solely on Chinese law or Chinese law in a comparative legal context. The series also welcomes edited volumes. It aims for critical analyses of Chinese law in a broad sense and the presentation of legal developments in China to an international audience of lawyers and non-lawyers. It welcomes studies in all areas of law and studies of an interdisciplinary nature. Titles in the Chinese and Comparative Law series will be of particular interest to the international community of academics and practising lawyers, policy makers, national and international governmental and non-governmental organisations, and others interested in the study of comparative law.

What constitutes the core values, tenets, cultural, historic, and ideological parameters of secularism in international contexts? In twelve chapters, this edited work examines current tensions in liberal secular states where myriad rights and freedoms compete regarding education, healthcare, end-of-life choices, clothing, sexual orientation, reproduction, and minority interests. It explores the legal complexity of defining a ‘religion’ through judicial decisions and scrutinises Christianity, Hinduism and Islam’s relative success in accommodating religious pluralism.

Part One explores the religious practice and persecution nexus, COVID-19’s effect on religious freedom, religious education, burqas/headscarves, and religious culture in civil law. Part Two explores the constitutional principle of secularism in Member States of the Council of Europe, US Religious Clauses, and religious freedom in South Africa, UK, Australia, and India.
Author:
Responsible credit is a policy much discussed by legislators and stakeholders, especially in the aftermath of the global financial crisis of 2007-2008. Creditworthiness and “Responsible Credit” questions how this policy currently finds implementation in EU and US law and the principal instruments used for this scope, including the duty of creditworthiness assessment of borrowers. Noah Vardi analyzes the fundamental and often overlooked notion of “creditworthiness” from a comparative perspective and examines the critical interaction between policies of access to credit, financial inclusion, and responsible lending.
Legal Remedies for the Protection of Cross-border Properties
The Polish dispute on an adequate approach towards the Białowieża Forest has been significantly internationalised, primarily by UNESCO and the European Union. The judgment of the CJEU has not settled the substance of the dispute, although it points to a violation of EU legal standards. The authors of The Disputed Białowieża Forest: Legal Remedies for the Protection of Cross-border Properties address the dispute in a constructive and interdisciplinary manner, rather than merely expressing concern towards in situ conservation, and derive universal legal remedies from it. They conclude that in the case of unique invaluable goods, adequate individual solutions should be applied in the form of a localised agreement, open to many entities (interested states, international organisations and even socially responsible private corporations), on the condition that organisational and financial co-responsibility are accepted.
This book places under scrutiny for the first time, whether and how, the United Nations Human Rights Council actually contributes to the protection of human rights in the face of pervasive gross violations world-wide. It finds that the Council does little of preventive protection, some mitigatory protection, and little remedial or compensatory protection. The Council’s response to situations of gross violations depends on the political alignments within its membership for each situation. The Council gives priority to cooperation and dialogue over principled denunciations of gross violations. It is not an organ of justice, but in some instances it is an organ for justice, inasmuch as it addresses the structural causes of violations. Much useful fact-finding takes place under the auspices of the Council, and it does contribute to the progressive development of international law.
A Computable Approach to Criminal Procedure Law
The volume presents an innovative analysis of defence rights in EU criminal proceedings through the lens of a computational approach to the law. This multi-level research tackles both EU law and national legislation, as well as case-law on defence rights in criminal proceedings.
The comparative analysis on procedural safeguards is integrated by legal informatics, that led to the translation into computable language of the relevant EU and national legislation.
Such multidisciplinary approach allows, through a semiautomated technology, to better highlight potentially uncovered deficit of the normative texts, and to enhance comparative analysis of legal systems.
The breakthrough perspective brings a novel viewpoint to the debate on criminal procedure rights, shading light on the potential emerging from the interaction between criminal law and technology.
Essays on Selected Case Studies about the Rights of Minorities
In this book, Bertus de Villiers offers unique insights into institutional design aimed at the protection of minority rights. He reflects on several case studies to highlight various aspects of the complexity of contemporary constitution drafting and how creative solutions have been found to secure the rights of minorities. The respective chapters drill down to a practical level to assist constitutional scholars, legal scientists, the judiciary and practitioners to better comprehend the dynamics of minority rights in the country under discussion; to be informed by the jurisprudence that have arisen; and to gain insights from the adjustments that had to be made to more effectively protect the rights of minorities.
In this book Siu Lang Carrillo Yap compares the land and forest rights of Amazonian indigenous peoples from Bolivia, Brazil, Ecuador and Peru, and analyses these rights in the context of international law, property law theory, and forest and soil sciences. Within this scope and against the historical background, the recent interrelations between the Amazonian indigenous peoples’ land, forest and community forest management rights and their importance for the self-determination of indigenous peoples in the Amazonian region are examined.

Through bringing together international law with national law, natural resources law with property law and law with natural sciences, the author sheds new light on the complex topic of indigenous peoples’ rights closely entwined with the conservation of the Amazonian rainforest.