Managing Liability Exposure for Injuries to Crew and Passengers Resulting from US Commercial Space Activities
In the only analysis of its kind, Dr. Maria-Vittoria “Giugi” Carminati asks the question: if a commercial space operator kills or injures one of its spaceflight participants or a crewmember, what is the extent of the operator’s liability? In the United States, that question has no clear answer. Dr. Carminati explores the way the United States manages liability, at state and federal level, and from state to state.

Tort law in the United States exists at the state level. However, commercial spaceflight and its regulation are creatures of federal law. Understanding how these two systems interact and, often, conflict is critical to understanding how commercial spaceflight operators can manage exposure.
Author: Diego Zannoni
Is international law equipped to tackle the challenges posed by the dramatic increase in disasters? In Disaster Management and International Space Law Diego Zannoni attempts to answer this crucial question through an analysis of the main legal issues involved, addressing both prevention and relief, with a special focus on major space applications such as remote sensing and telecommunications, and the attendant specific legal regimes.
It is argued that, when lives of human beings are in danger, territorial sovereignty becomes, to a certain extent, porous and bends in front of the value of human life and the urgent need to rescue. On the other hand, specific obligations were identified to cooperate in the prevention and management of disasters, particularly in terms of data sharing.
The Definition and Delimitation of Outer Space and Territorial Airspace in International Law
Author: Thomas Gangale
In How High the Sky?, jurist Thomas Gangale explores the oldest and most important controversy in space law: how far up does national airspace go, and where does the international environment of outer space begin? Even though nations did not object to the first satellites flying over their sovereign territory, after more than six decades there is still no international agreement on how low the right of space object overflight extends, nor are there agreed legal definitions of “space object” and “space activity.” Dr. Gangale brings his background as an aerospace engineer to bear in exploding long-held beliefs of the legal community, and he offers a draft international convention to settle the oldest and most intractable problems in space law.
A Legal Study of Responsibility for Polluting the Space Environment and Liability for Damage Caused by Space Debris
Author: Peter Stubbe
In State Accountability for Space Debris Peter Stubbe examines the legal consequences of space debris pollution which, he argues, is a global environmental concern. The study finds that the customary ‘no harm’ rule and Article IX of the Outer Space Treaty obligate States to prevent the generation of debris and that the international community as a whole has a legitimate interest in their compliance. A breach of these obligations entails the responsibility of a State and compensation must be provided for damage caused by space debris. The author treats responsibility and liability separately and thoroughly scrutinizes both legal regimes with the help of common analytical elements. Finally, Peter Stubbe argues that a comprehensive traffic management system is required so as to ensure the safe and sustainable use of outer space.
Collected Work of Cheng Bin
Editor: Chia-Jui Cheng
Studies in International Air Law: Selected Works of Bin Cheng brings together for the first time the most influential of his many significant works. The selected essays, collected by editor Professor Cheng Chia-Jui, provide a comprehensive survey of international air law, authoritative and pioneering analyses of international air transport, the legal status of aircraft and crimes on board and against aircraft and air carrier’s liability.

Widely acknowledged as the "Father of International Air Law,” Studies in International Air Law reveals the author’s enormous contributions to the science of air law along with his extraordinary intellectual and analytical spirit.
Law of the Sea, Outer Space, and Antarctica
In this fourth installment of the American Classics in International Law series, John Norton Moore approaches what are generally, if perhaps misleadingly, known as “common resources” in international law. The contributions in this volume, reflecting some of the best writing in each area by American international legal scholars, cover the law of the sea, the law of outer space, and the law of Antarctica. While each is a discrete subject area, they have a shared thread of encompassing “common” areas of the oceans, space and the Antarctic continent.

From Jessup's important 1927 piece on Maritime Jurisdiction to contemporary writings on outer space law and the evolution of the Antarctic Treaty, Moore compiles a comprehensive collection of influential American scholarship spanning more than 80 years on the world's shared resources, often revealing the importance of United States foreign policy in the development of each of these areas. Brought together by an Introduction by the Editor, this volume serves as the definitive resource for the American contribution to international law and common resources.
In: Studies in International Air Law
In: Studies in International Air Law