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How is it possible to write down the Japanese language exclusively in Chinese characters? And how are we then able to determine the language behind the veil of the Chinese script as Japanese? The history of writing in Japan presents us with a fascinating variety of writing styles ranging from phonography to morphography and all shades in between.
In Japanese Morphography: Deconstructing hentai kanbun, Gordian Schreiber shows that texts traditionally labelled as “hentai kanbun” or “variant Chinese” are, in fact, morphographically written Japanese texts instead and not just the result of an underdeveloped skill in Chinese. The study fosters our understanding of writing system typology beyond phonographic writing.
This book presents for the first time all texts constituting the Eastern Old Japanese corpus as well as the dictionary including all lexical items found. Unlike its relative Western Old Japanese, Eastern Old Japanese is not based on the language of just two geographic localities, but is stretched along several provinces of Ancient Japan along the Pacific Seaboard (modern Aichi to Ibaraki) and across the island of Honshū from Etchū (Modern Toyama and parts of Ishikawa) province to Shinano and Kai provinces (modern Nagano and Yamanashi). Therefore, references to places of attestation are included into our dictionary, too.
Nobody can deny that an account of grammatical change that takes written contact into consideration is a significant challenge for any theoretical perspective. Written contact of earlier periods or from a diachronic perspective mainly refers to contact through translation. The present book includes a diachronic dimension in the study of written language contact by examining aspects of the history of translation as related to grammatical changes in English and Greek in a contrastive way. In this respect, emphasis is placed on the analysis of diachronic retranslations: the book examines translations from earlier periods of English and Greek in relation to various grammatical characteristics of these languages in different periods and in comparison to non-translated texts.
Volume Editor: Bayarma Khabtagaeva
András Róna-Tas, distinguished Professor Emeritus at the University of Szeged, Hungary, winner of several international prestigious prizes, has devoted his long academic career to the study of Chuvash, Turkic elements in Hungarian, Mongolic-Tibetan linguistic contacts, the Para-Mongolic language Khitan and other Central Asian languages and cultures. This book, presented to him in the occasion of his 90th birthday, contains a collection of papers in Turkic and Mongolic Studies, with a focus on the literacy, culture, and languages of the steppe civilizations. It is organized in three sections: Turkic Studies, Mongolic Studies, and Linguistic and cultural contacts of Altaic languages. It contains papers by some of most renowned experts in Central Asia Studies.
Contributors are Klára Agyagási, Ákos Bertalan Apatóczky, Ágnes Birtalan, Uwe Bläsing, Éva Csáki, Éva Ágnes Csató, Edina Dallos, Marcel Erdal, Stefan Georg, Peter Golden, Mária Ivanics, Juha Janhunen, Lars Johanson, György Kara, Bayarma Khabtagaeva, Jens Peter Laut, Raushangul Mukusheva, Olach Zsuzsanna, Benedek Péri, Elisabetta Ragagnin, Pavel Rykin, Uli Schamiloglu, János Sipos, István Vásáry, Alexander Vovin, Michael Weiers, Jens Wilkens, Wu Yingzhe, Emine Yilmaz, and Peter Zieme.
Author: Kirsten Middeke
The Old English Case System. Case and Argument Structure Constructions by Kirsten Middeke is a Construction Grammar account of Old English argument structure that integrates modern cognitive corpus linguistics and traditional philological work. This is the first major study on Old English morphosyntax from a constructional perspective, based on findings from various strands of theoretical linguistics, including generative approaches, constructionist accounts, quantitative linguistics, and many more. It argues for a new take on historical comparative syntax, a field which has been dormant for quite a while but might see a new boost through the ideas presented here.
Linguistic Prehistory of the Greek Dialects and Homeric Kunstsprache
Author: Lucien van Beek
How can we explain metrical irregularities in Homeric phrases like ἀνδροτῆτα καὶ ἥβην? What do such phrases tell us about the antiquity of the epic tradition? And how did doublet forms such as τέτρατος beside τέταρτος originate?
In this book, you will find the first systematic and complete account of the syllabic liquids in Ancient Greek. It provides an up-to-date, comprehensive and innovative etymological treatment of material from all dialects, including Mycenaean. A new model of linguistic change in the epic tradition is used to tackle two hotly-debated problems: metrical irregularities in Homer (including muta cum liquida) and the double reflex. The proposed solution has important consequences for Greek dialect classification and the prehistory of Epic language and meter.