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Paradigmatic Relations in Word Formation brings together contributions that aim to discuss the nature of paradigms in derivational morphology and compounding in the light of evidence from various languages.
Among others, the topics considered in the volume include the interconnectedness between derivational families and paradigms, the constitutive characteristics of a word-formation paradigm, the degree of predictability of word-formation paradigms, and the specificity of paradigms depending on the variety of recognised word-formation processes and patterns.
Central Trentino is a Romance dialect spoken in the North-East of Italy, which shows features belonging to both Gallo-Italic and Venetan dialects. Grammar of Central Trentino aims to present the first comprehensive grammatical description of this dialect, taking into consideration its morpho-syntactic properties and pragmatic phenomena.
The book's general approach is synchronic and focused on the language currently in use. The authors discuss a wide range of examples gathered from both oral and written sources.
The theoretical reference model is that of generative grammar, but the description of the phenomena is also accessible to a non-specialized audience.
In The Hittite Middle Voice Guglielmo Inglese offers a new treatment of the middle voice in Hittite. The book features two main parts. In the first part, the author provides an updated synchronic description of the Hittite middle based on the existing typology of voice systems and valency changing operations. Moreover, based on a careful analysis of a chronologically ordered corpus of original Hittite texts, the book offers the first ever diachronic account of the Hittite middle. As Inglese argues, the findings of this book greatly enrich our general knowledge of the diachronic typology of middle voice systems. The second part of the book features a thorough description of more than 100 Hittite verbs in original texts.
Editor: Peter Hallman
Interactions of Degree and Quantification is a collection of chapters edited by Peter Hallman that deal with superlative, equative and differential constructions cross-linguistically, interactions of the comparative with both individual quantifiers and event structure, the use of the individual quantifier ‘some’ as a numeral, and the question of whether the very notion of ‘degree’ is reducible to a relation between individuals. These issues all represent semantic parallels and interactions between individual quantifiers ( every, some, etc.) and degree quantifiers ( more, most, numerals, etc.) in the expression of quantity and measurement. The contributions presented here advance the analytical depth and cross-linguistic breadth of the state of the art in semantics and its interface with syntax in human language.
Author: Muteb Alqarni
In Introduction to Generative Syntax, Muteb Alqarni combines his teaching experience with the research of experts in English syntax and offers the reader a tool to study the developments of syntactic theories since the 1960s until recent times.

In 250 units, Alqarni explores topics commonly encountered in the study of syntax in an accessible and straight-forward manner. Lexicon, Phrase Structure Rules, X'-Theory, Transformational Grammar, Theta Theory, Government and Binding Theory, Raising and Control, Movement Constraints, Split Projections and the Minimalist Program are just some of the topics covered.
During several decades, syntactic reconstruction has been more or less regarded as a bootless and an unsuccessful venture, not least due to the heavy criticism in the 1970s from scholars like Watkins, Jeffers, Lightfoot, etc. This fallacious view culminated in Lightfoot’s (2002: 625) conclusion: “[i]f somebody thinks that they can reconstruct grammars more successfully and in more widespread fashion, let them tell us their methods and show us their results. Then we’ll eat the pudding.” This volume provides methods for the identification of i) cognates in syntax, and ii) the directionality of syntactic change, showcasing the results in the introduction and eight articles. These examples are offered as both tastier and also more nourishing than the pudding Lightfoot had in mind when discarding the viability of reconstructing syntax.
Proceedings of the Seventeenth International Congress of Neo-Latin Studies (Albacete 2018)
Every third year, the members of the International Association for Neo-Latin Studies (IANLS) assemble for a week-long conference. Over the years, this event has evolved into the largest single conference in the field of Neo-Latin studies. The papers presented at these conferences offer, then, a general overview of the current status of Neo-Latin research; its current trends, popular topics, and methodologies. In 2018, the members of IANLS gathered for a conference in Albacete (Spain) on the theme of “Humanity and Nature: Arts and Sciences in Neo-Latin Literature”. This volume presents the conference’s papers which were submitted after the event and which have undergone a peer-review process. The papers deal with a broad range of fields, including literature, history, philology, and religious studies.

Abstract

En las Centurias, Amato Lusitano recoge su experiencia profesional. Una de las enfermedades que aparece retratada es la entonces conocida como morbo gálico. Estudiar cómo Amato Lusitano aborda esta enfermedad en las distintas curationes, a qué pacientes trata y con qué medicamentos y recomendaciones, permite adentrarse en su modo general de componer el relato patográfico. Además, dada la ‘novedad’ que en la medicina del siglo XVI supone la enfermedad, el comportamiento de Amato permite ver cómo se refleja en su obra la polémica contemporánea y su vinculación con las autoridades médicas o su preferencia por la experientia como fuente de autoridad.

In: Acta Conventus Neo-Latini Albasitensis

Abstract

La valoración desde el punto de vista de la crítica textual de los testimonios que transmiten la traducción latina de la Política de Leonardo Bruni es todavía una tarea pendiente de la filología latina humanística. Tras el estudio del comportamiento de diecisiete testimonios (diez manuscritos y siete ediciones impresas) de dicha obra mediante la comparación de unos pasajes significativos, es posible establecer un primer grupo de manuscritos, bastante homogéneo tanto en lo que respecta al estado del texto que transmiten como a sus características físicas, creados para el estudio académico (entre ellos están F3, M2, Ma, Mc; y también M1, aunque éste presenta especificidades propias); y un segundo grupo, formado por ejemplares de lujo, cuyo texto transmitido resulta más heterogéneo (P, F4, V1 y V2). Un papel crucial en la transmisión parece jugar el manuscrito F1 (Florencia, BML, MS Plut. 89 sup. 54), pues en él se observan lecturas dobles que definen esos dos grupos descritos. En cuanto a las ediciones impresas, estas presentan igualmente un estado del texto muy variado; no obstante, puede seguirse una línea de transmisión que parte de la edición de Valencia por Lambert Palmart en 1473 (v) y pasa por la “revolucionaria” recensión de Jacques Lefèvre d’Étaples, impresa en París por Henri Estienne en 1506 (pfs), hasta llegar a las ediciones basilienses de Johann Oporin en 1538 y 1542 (o1 y o2 respectivamente).

In: Acta Conventus Neo-Latini Albasitensis

Abstract

Western Europeans (fifteenth–sixteenth century) travelled to Southeastern Greece and the Mediterranean by land or sea for various purposes, such us commerce, pilgrimage to the Holy Land or diplomatic missions. Erudite Italian humanists interested in antiquity toured the Greek islands and partly explored continental Greece. They recorded their journeys in the early travelogues. Travellers with a certain theoretical baggage recount the historical past, drawing upon Greek and Latin literature, as well as their personal experiences from their travels. The present paper focuses on the perception of nature and people, as presented in three different types of literary genres: an isolario, a diary and a narrative poem. Cristoforo Buondelmonti in his isolario Liber insularum archipelagi (1420), Ciriaco d’ Ancona in his Diaries from his early and later travels (1400–45), and Hugo Favolius in his epic poem Hodoeporici Byzantini libri III (1563) enrich their reminiscences of the classical past with representations of Greek nature and comments upon the people they encounter. This article aims to explore the varied approaches of the writers and the aspects of Greek nature and the local people, which are enhanced in their travel accounts.

In: Acta Conventus Neo-Latini Albasitensis