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This book intends to look into CLIL teaching professional practice through the prism of reflection. It offers a comprehensive coverage of a CLIL teacher’s features, their attitudes to the approach, teaching methodology, assessment, materials development, cooperation with other CLIL and non-CLIL teachers, professional development, expectations and beliefs. Furthermore, it focuses on CLIL teachers’ positive and negative emotions experienced in relation to CLIL. As a CLIL trainer I spend a lot of time with CLIL teachers trying to guide them in the process of teaching in CLIL but also to help them face many challenges and overcome obstacles which often discourage them from working in the CLIL environment. Being greatly inspired by the ongoing research in the field but also by my CLIL trainee teachers I felt there was a need to conduct such research and make the reader reflect on his/her own teaching experiences in CLIL.
Volume Editors: and
A crucial question for Chinese as a Second Language research is how to help elevate Chinese language teaching methodology to the level of other world language methodologies such as English, Spanish and German. This work goes in two directs. One explores how to apply research results achieved in Chinese linguistics to Chinese language teaching and the other is engaged in creating a strong applied linguistics research field that supports Chinese language teaching. CASLAR scholars are mainly involved in the latter one. This book is a representative sample of their research endeavors.
Editor-in-Chief:
Multilingualism is a complex phenomenon that can be studied from different perspectives in disciplines such as linguistics, psycholinguistics, sociolinguistics and education. The investigation of its manifold forms and language learning is an important field of research in applied linguistics. As multilingualism and linguistic diversity are perceived as increasingly advantageous globally, official policies emerge that aim to implement and increase demands for language learning and linguistic diversity.
Language Learning and Multilingualism is a series that puts consideration of learners’ multilingual experiences, identities and competencies at the heart of studies of language education. The series takes an expansive view of language education and explores language learning across a range of formal and informal learning contexts. The series provides the latest study on language learning and multilingualism, and it is intended for academics, researchers, practitioners to present high-quality, original and state-of-the-art research describing theoretical and empirical aspects contributing to the advancement of our understanding of multilingualism and language education. As part of a commitment to broadening the horizons of the field, it particularly welcomes studies focused on lesser-taught languages, marginalised communities and/or emerging from the Global South.
Language Learning and Multilingualism is a peer-reviewed series that provides a comprehensive survey of multilingualism and language education policy for a global audience. The series is an ideal resource for advanced undergraduates and postgraduate students, and researchers of multilingualism. The editors of Language Learning and Multilingualism encourage submissions of high quality monographs and edited volumes from a variety of theoretical and methodological perspectives that speak to these overarching aims.
Approaches to Translation Studies is an international series promoting the scholarly study of translation. The notion of plural ‘approaches’ to translation and its study calls up images of scholarly explorers following untrodden paths to translation, or more cautiously (re)tracing the familiar routes. Either way, it indicates a refusal to be tied to dogma or prejudice, a curiosity about possible new vistas, and an awareness that the observer’s view depends on where s/he comes from. But a recognition of the plurality of possible approaches does not necessarily mean passive acquiescence to relativism and scepticism. The idea of ‘approaching’ translation also implies a sense of purpose and direction.

In the context of today’s globalised and pluralised world, this metaphorically suggested perspective is perhaps more relevant than ever before. The series therefore remains fully committed to it, while trying to respond to the rapid changes of our digital age. Ready to travel between genres, media and technologies, willing to span centuries and continents, and always keeping an open mind about the various oppositions that have too often needlessly divided researchers (e.g. high culture versus popular culture, linguistics versus literary studies versus cultural studies, translation ‘proper’ versus ‘adaptation’), the series Approaches to Translation Studies will continue to accommodate all translation-oriented books that match high-quality scholarship with an equal concern for reader-friendly communication.

Approaches to Translation Studies is open to a wide range of scholarly publications in the field of Translation Studies (monographs, collective volumes…). Dissertations are welcome but will obviously need to be thoroughly adapted to their new function and readership. Conference proceedings and collections of articles will only be considered if they show strong thematic unity and tight editorial control. For practical reasons, the series intends to continue its tradition of publishing English-language research. While students, teachers and scholars in the various schools and branches of Translation Studies make up its primary readership, the series also aims to promote a dialogue with readers and authors from various neighbouring disciplines.

Approaches to Translation Studies was launched in 1970 by James S Holmes (1924-1986), who was also one of the ‘founding fathers’ of Translation Studies as an academic discipline. At later stages the series’ editorship passed into the hands of Raymond van den Broeck, Kitty M. van Leuven-Zwart and Ton Naaijkens. Being the very first international series specifically catering for the needs of the fledgling discipline in the 1970s, Approaches to Translation Studies has played a significant historical role in providing it with a much needed platform as well as giving it greater visibility in the academic marketplace.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the publisher at BRILL, Masja Horn.

Volumes 2, 4, and 5 were published by Van Gorcum (Assen, The Netherlands), but orders should be directed to Brill | Rodopi.

The series published an average of two volumes per year over the last 5 years.
This book takes a fresh look at the challenge of setting up educational writing intervention studies in authentic class contexts. In four sections, the book offers innovative approaches on how to conceptualize, design, implement, and evaluate writing interventions for research purposes. Hot topics in the field such as professional development for scaling up writing interventions, building research practice partnerships, implementation variation and fidelity, and response to intervention are addressed. To illustrate the proposed approaches for writing promotion, the book showcases a wide variety of writing interventions from around the world, ranging from single-participant designs to large-scale intervention studies in writing.
Volume Editors: and
The development of teaching and learning materials is an essential component of endangered language revitalisation, yet there is very little academic research on this crucial topic. Our volume seeks to address this imbalance by examining endangered language pedagogical materials from around the world including traditional resources such as grammars, dictionaries, and textbooks, as well as new media such as online courses, apps, video games, etc. Chapters provide theoretical and applied perspectives, and consider Indigenous and other threatened languages from various regions of the world including the Americas, Australia, Europe, the Indian subcontinent, and Southeast Asia. This volume is the first in the FEL Yearbook Series.
The electronic version of the Utrecht Studies in Language and Communication series.

The Utrecht Studies in Language and Communication series publishes monographs as well as edited volumes on research on communication and language use. The series focuses on language use in specific social and cultural settings, expressly including the pragmatics of multilingualism, investigating the relation between discourse characteristics and the effectivity of the communication.
Research draws upon a cooperation between such diverse disciplines as text linguistics, discourse analysis, ethnography of communication, speech act theory, functional pragmatics, cognitive linguistics, educational linguistics, cognitive psychology and anthropology.

Published volumes report developments in academic and applied research on:
• the functional quality of texts and text features in view of the specific goals and the addressees of professional and educational institutions
• the relationship between discourse, identity and context in specific and changing social and cultural settings, including different modes of multilingual and multicultural interactions (e.g. lingua franca, lingua receptiva or code-switching)
• the acquisition of second, third and foreign languages in educational settings, specifically paying attention to the pragmatics in a multilingual society
• the cognitive basis of discourse processing in continuously changing contexts, and the skills underlying goal-directed language use in familiar as well as novel situations
This book deals with the tension between a strategy of language maintenance (protecting and reinforcing the language where it is still spoken by community members) and a strategy of language revitalization (opening up access to the language to all interested people and encouraging new domains of its use). The case study presented concerns a grammar school in Upper Lusatia, which hosts the coexistence of a community of Upper Sorbian-speakers and a group of German native speakers who are learning Upper Sorbian at school. The tensions between these two groups studying at the same school are presented in this book against the background of various language strategies, practices and ideologies. The conflict of interests between the “traditional” community which perceives itself as the “guardians” of the minority language and its potential new speakers is played off on different levels by policy-makers and may be read through different levels of language policy and planning.
Volume 1: Interactive, Contrastive, and Cultural Representational Approaches
How do you react to an intercultural situation that you do not understand? There are four options. You wait until it’s over. You adjust your behavior and “do as the natives do.” You blame the other as strange and stupid. Or you start to wonder by thinking about yourself and the other(s). This last option is called a Rich Point. This book provides an overview of research into intercultural communication. It is not a handbook, but offers nine studies that illustrate the reflection process from different scholarly perspectives. The approaches in this volume are the interaction approach, contrastive approach and cultural representational approach.

Volume 2 offers nine additional chapters exemplifying the multilingualism approach and transfer approach including research into intercultural competences. Together, the chapters illustrate the essence of the essentialism and non-essentialism debate regarding diversity and inclusion.

Have you ever found yourself in an intercultural situation you did not understand? How did you react? Did you wonder if you could have reacted differently? What have you learnt that could support you in similar future occasions? Test your knowledge of Intercultural Communication with this quiz!

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