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This book comprises English translations of Nizhādnāmah-i Afghān (Afghan Genealogy) and Tazakkur al-Inqilāb (Memoir of the Revolution), the culminating works of Fayż Muḥammad Kātib Hazārah’s monumental history of Afghanistan, Sirāj al-tawārīkh (The History of Afghanistan). Nizhādnāmah-i Afghān, a detailed guide to all the ethnic and religious communities in Afghanistan in the first third of the 20th century, is the first locally-produced ethnography by a modern Afghan scholar. The Tazakkur al-Inqilāb is Fayz Muhammad’s journalistic record of seven of the nine months of Amīr Ḥabīb Allāh Kalakānī’s reign in 1929. Together with the History of Afghanistan these works offer an incomparable resource for the history of Afghanistan from the mid-18th to the mid-20th centuries.
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Daniel Varisco

Varisco’s Culture Still Matters: Notes from the Field is on the relationship between ethnographic fieldwork and the culture concept in the ongoing debate over the future of anthropology, drawing on the history of both concepts. Despite being the major social science that offers a methodology and tools to understand diverse cultures worldwide, scholars within and outside anthropology have attacked this field for all manner of sins, including fostering colonialism and essentializing others. This book revitalizes constructive debate of this vibrant field’s history, methods and contributions, drawing on the author’s ethnographic experience in Yemen. It covers complicated theoretical concepts about culture and their critiques in readable prose, accessible to students and interested social scientists in other fields.
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Africa Yearbook Volume 14

Politics, Economy and Society South of the Sahara in 2017

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The Africa Yearbook covers major domestic political developments, the foreign policy and socio-economic trends in sub-Sahara Africa – all related to developments in one calendar year. The Yearbook contains articles on all sub-Saharan states, each of the four sub-regions (West, Central, Eastern, Southern Africa) focusing on major cross-border developments and sub-regional organizations as well as one article on continental developments and one on African-European relations. While the articles have thorough academic quality, the Yearbook is mainly oriented to the requirements of a large range of target groups: students, politicians, diplomats, administrators, journalists, teachers, practitioners in the field of development aid as well as business people.
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Various Authors & Editors

An expanding e-book collection of carefully selected research companions to various key aspects of Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies. Peer reviewed and written by experts, these handbooks offer balanced accounts at an advanced level, along with an overview of the state of scholarship and a synthesis of debate, pointing the way for future research. All volumes are in English.

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‘King of Kings of Africa’

Racializing Qaddafi in the Visual Output of the 2011 Libyan Revolution

Christiane Gruber

Abstract

During the 2011 uprisings, artists and cultural agents unleashed biting pictorial forms of ridicule in Libya’s public domain. Their chief target was Muʿammar Qaddafi, the ‘Brother Leader’ of the Libyan Arab Republic and the so-called ‘King of Kings of Africa’. After failing to win support from Arab governments, Qaddafi campaigned for African unity, fashioning himself as a traditional sub-Saharan chief during the decade leading up to the ‘Arab Spring’. His bombastic African title, his Afro-like (shafshufa) hairstyle and his eye-catching robes made him an easy target for visual satire, which turned visibly more racist when he and his son, Sayf al-Islam, resorted to using mercenaries from the Sudan, Chad, Niger and Mali to violently suppress street demonstrations. Throughout the uprisings, anti-government actors sought to degrade Qaddafi through the use of ethnic stereotypes, revealing that, in the particular case of Libya, satirical contentions during the so-called ‘Arab Spring’ were not just transgressive and factional, but instrumentally racist as well.

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Christiane Gruber

Abstract

This special issue of Middle East Journal of Culture and Communication, entitled ‘Creative Dissent: Visual Arts of the Arab World Uprisings’, explores the artistic modes of dissent that have marked the uprisings during and in the aftermath of the so-called ‘Arab Spring’. Scholars working in various fields of the humanities consider the 2011 uprisings’ more creative—and rather fleeting—manifestations, from lived environments activated on the ground to imagined spaces generated by online platforms. Collectively, the contributors underscore that the visual arts of the Arab world uprisings should not be considered by-products or afterthoughts to social and political action. Instead, they are located at the core and at the vanguard, propelling the energetic dimension of crowds both in the streets and in cyberspace.

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An Enduring Monument

Bahrain’s 2011 Pearl Roundabout Protests

Elizabeth Rauh

Abstract

On the morning of 18 March 2011, Bahrain’s state television broadcast the razing of the Pearl Roundabout and its iconic sculpture. This event, unsurprisingly, failed to quell the struggle between activists and the ruling elite. Rather, the destruction of the Pearl Monument (Luʾluʾ) and Bahrain’s ‘Pearl Square’ offered demonstrators a readymade symbol embodying the traumatic and violent days of the 2011 demonstrations and the ongoing government suppression of reform movements. Rematerializations of the Luʾluʾ through photographs, graffiti, digital art, sculptural maquettes and even costumes echo the physical structure in miniature and continue to regenerate and multiply the monument like a viral meme. Through such manifestations and reanimations the now-vanished monument continues to occupy Bahrain’s public spaces and civic memory, enduringly resisting the state’s efforts to erase it and all it represents. In examining the ‘lifecycle’ of the Luʾluʾ, this article explores how an act of iconoclasm can result in an outpouring of new creative activities.

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The Third Edition of Brill’s Encyclopaedia of Islam appears in substantial segments each year, both online and in print. The new scope includes comprehensive coverage of Islam in the twentieth century and of Muslim minorities all over the world.
This Part 2018-5 of the Third Edition of Brill’s Encyclopaedia of Islam will contain 49 new articles, reflecting the great diversity of current scholarship in the fields of Islamic Studies.
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Dissenting Bodies

The Performance Art of Adham Hafez

Jessica Winegar

Abstract

This article explores the art of Adham Hafez, an Egypt-based performer, choreographer and music composer, in relation to the political and social turmoil in Egypt leading up to and following the 2011 uprising. Hafez’s work through and on the body highlights how the uprisings themselves were a rejection of various assaults on the body rendered by the Egyptian state, colonialism and global capitalism. By focusing on the ways that Hafez’s performances reconfigure the senses, and relations between the body and language, this article shows how performance can be a site of dissensus that creates potentially transformative resonance between bodies—in Tahrir Square and beyond.