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Volume Editors: and
This volume brings together thirteen case studies devoted to the establishment, growth, and demise of holy places in Muslim societies, thereby providing a global look on Muslim engagement with the emplacement of the holy. Combining research by historians, art historians, archaeologists, and historians of religion, the volume bridges different approaches to the study of the concept of “holiness” in Muslim societies. It addresses a wide range of geographical regions, from Indonesia and India to Morocco and Senegal, highlighting the strategies implemented in the making and unmaking of holy places in Muslim lands.

Contributors: David N. Edwards, Claus-Peter Haase, Beatrice Hendrich, Sara Kuehn, Zacharie Mochtari de Pierrepont, Sara Mondini, Harry Munt, Luca Patrizi, George Quinn, Eric Ross, Ruggero Vimercati Sanseverino, Ethel Sara Wolper.
Texts, Traditions and Practices, 10th-21st Centuries
Memory and Commemoration across Central Asia: Texts, Traditions and Practices, 10th-21st Centuries is a collection of fourteen studies by a group of scholars active in the field of Central Asian Studies, presenting new research into various aspects of the rich cultural heritage of Central Asia (including Afghanistan). By mapping and exploring the interaction between political, ideological, literary and artistic production in Central Asia, the contributors offer a wide range of perspectives on the practice and usage of historical and religious commemoration in different contexts and timeframes. Making use of different approaches – historical, literary, anthropological, or critical heritage studies, the contributors show how memory functions as a fundamental constituent of identity formation in both past and present, and how this has informed perceptions in and outside Central Asia today.
Author:
ضمن كتاب من تريبوليتانيا إلى أطرابلس، يتناول حافظ عبدولي مسألة انتقال إقليم/كورة طرابلس الغرب من الفترة القديمة المتأخرة إلى الفترة الإسلامية المبكّرة. وذلك وفق مقاربة منهجية تقوم من جهة على مقارعة المعطيات التي توفّرها مختلف المصادر الأدبيّة مع نظيرتها الطوبونيميّة والأونومستكية والأثرية ومن جهة أخرى تعتمد تشبيك المناهج المتنوّعة.
وقد خلص باعتماد هذا المنهج إلى نتائج مجدّدة تستند إلى براهين علميّة تؤكّد – على خلاف ما كان شائعا – أنّ المرور من تريبوليتانيا اللاتينية-المسيحيّة إلى أطرابلس العربية-الإسلامية لم يكن بصفة فجائية عبر إحداث قطيعة فوريّة وهوّة فاصلة بين الفترتين القديمة والوسيطة، بل كان كما الحال في بقيّة مجالات بلاد المغرب تدريجيّا وبطيئا في كل المستويات الحضارية. وقد كانت المسائل المتعلّقة بتفسير كيفية حدوث هذا الانتقال والآليات التي حكمته وانعكاس ذلك على تشكّل المشهد التعميري خلال العصر الوسيط المتقدّم، من أهمّ الهواجس المعرفية التي حاول الكتاب الإجابة عنها.

In From Tripolitania to Tripoli, Hafed Abdouli deals with the transition of Tripolitania from late Antiquity to the early Islamic period. He compares a detailed analysis of all the literary sources with the evaluation of the archaeological, onomastic and toponymic findings. For this purpose, he makes use of various research methodologies.
This approach brings about new results. It confirms that — contrary to what has been so far commonly assumed — the transition from the Latin-Christian Tripolitania to the Arabic-Islamic Tripoli was not sudden. There was no rigorous break that seperated the ancient from the medieval period. On the contrary, as was also the case in the rest of the Maghreb, the transition was progressive and slow at all levels of civilization. The interpretation of how this transition occurred, the mechanisms that determined it, and its reflection on the urban landscape during the early medieval period, are among the most important epistemological concerns that this book tries to answer.
Studies on Graphic Representations in Sufi Literature (13th to 16th Century)
Volume Editor:
Visualizing Sufism approaches the question of the presence of graphic materials in Islamic mystical literature from a broad and comprehensive perspective. To this goal, an international group of specialists in the field worked on largely manuscript and unpublished sources with the aim of analyzing the use of visual elements in the works of some key figures of Islamic mysticism—Ibn al-ʿArabī, Aḥmad al-Būnī, Saʿd al-Dīn Ḥamūyeh, al-Shaʿrānī—, and in intellectual networks—Ḥurūfiyya and Bektashiyya, Shīrīn Maghribī and his connections. The result is the most extensive collection of specimens of Sufi graphic materials ever brought together and discussed in a single volume. By virtue of the object of study investigated in the chapters of this book, in addition to the history of Sufism, questions are raised that touch upon numerous areas in the field of Islamic Studies, including intellectual history, codicology, and art history.

Contributors
Elizabeth R. Alexandrin, Noah Gardiner, Ali Karjoo-Ravary, Evyn Kropf, Giovanni Maria Martini, Orkhan Mir-Kasimov, and Sophie Tyser.
Volume Editor:
The Hand of Fatima traces the development and symbolism ascribed to the hand motif in the Arab and Islamic world, and beyond. Richly illustrated, it details the many types of khamsas produced historically and today – such as khamsas with swords, and khamsas with eagles – and the many objects on which khamsas appear, such as on amulets and flags. It traces the journey of the khamsa into the contemporary world of social and fine art, including museum highlights. Special sections are dedicated to the khamsa in Algeria; cultural crossover in Spain, Portugal, and Brazil; and the symbol of the hand in Shiʿism.
How can medieval art explain Jerusalem’s centrality in the world faiths of Christianity and Islam? This book delves into that topic by examining how Jerusalem was creatively represented and reimagined in several intriguing Christian and Islamic artworks in the later Middle Ages (c. 1187 to 1356).
The book considers how European Catholic crusaders, Eastern Christian sects, and diverse Muslim factions displayed Jerusalem’s architecture to express their interpretation of the holy city’s sanctity and influence. These examples demonstrate how artworks can reflect Jerusalem’s importance to these faiths in the past and illuminate our understanding of its status into the modern era.
This book, the first of three, offers an anthology of Western descriptions of Islamic religious buildings of Spain, Turkey, India and Persia, mostly from the seventeenth to early twentieth centuries, taken from books and ambassadorial reports. As travel became easier and cheaper, thanks to viable roads, steamships, hotels and railways, tourist numbers increased, museums accumulated eastern treasures, illustrated journals proliferated, and photography provided accurate data. The second volume covers some of the religious architecture of Syria, Egypt and North Africa, while the third deals with Islamic palaces around the Mediterranean. All three deal with the impact of Western trade, taste and imports on the East, and examine the encroachment of westernised modernism, judged responsible for the degradation of Islamic styles.
[Ancient Architecture in Syria: Djebel Simʿân]
Editor / Translator:
يستعرض كتاب العمارة القديمة في سوريا (جبل سمعان)، من تأليف هوارد كروسبي باتلر وترجمة عائشة موسى، 24 موقعًا أثريًا في شمال سوريا. ويُسلِّط كل موقعٍ منها الضوء على اكتشافات جديدة تقف شاهدةً على عظمة الحضارات التي امتزجت بين جنباتها، مخلفةً وراءها إرثًا سرمديًا لا ينسى.
وتأتي قلعة القديس سمعان العمودي في طليعة هذه المواقع وتعد أكثرها شهرة، وبقيت في صدارة العمارة الكاتدرائية حتى بناء آيا صوفيا، كما بشَّرت بالتطور العمراني الديني اللاحق في كل من القسطنطينية وأوروبا.
وثمة مخططات ومقاطع عرضية وصور توضح جميع هذه المعالم، وتعمل على توثيق أبنيتها وتفاصيلها وتخليد هذا الكنز الذي لا يقدَّر بثمن للأجيال القادمة.
The Ancient Architecture in Syria (Djebel Simʿân), written by Howard C. Butler and translated by Aisha Moussa, covers 24 ancient sites in Northern Syria. Each site sparks new revelations about the great civilizations mingled there, leaving behind an unforgettable, everlasting legacy.
The first and most notable site is the citadel of St Simeon Stylets, which was not surpassed by any cathedral till Hagia Sophia and heralded the subsequent religious architectural development in Constantinople and Europe.
Each monument is illustrated by plans, cross-sections and photographs documenting its structure and details and preserving this invaluable treasure for endless generations to come.
Muqarnas 39 offers a rich panoply of studies extending across the breadth of the Muslim realm—from Andalusia to India—and across a millennium of years. The volume’s topics range from the material artifacts of textiles, pen boxes, fourteenth-century manuscripts, Ottoman Treasury valuables, a nineteenth-century Ottoman coin collection, Classical marble frieze slabs, royal palanquins, and sphero-conical vessels to Orientalist internalization, mosque and city architecture—the construction even of an entire city—and the archaeological, museological, legal, and sociological analysis of such. Luxuriously illustrated and thoroughly researched, each of the twelve articles presents a visual and engaging unpacking of an aspect of Islamicate culture that will introduce its reader to new and fascinating insights.