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Volume I: Essays / Volume 2-1: Arabic Edition / Volume 2-2: Arabic Edition / Volume 3-1: Annotated English Translation / Volume 3-2: Annotated English Translation, Appendices and Indices
An online, Open Access version of this work is also available from Brill.

A Literary History of Medicine by the Syrian physician Ibn Abī Uṣaybiʿah (d. 1270) is the earliest comprehensive history of medicine. It contains biographies of over 432 physicians, ranging from the ancient Greeks to the author’s contemporaries, describing their training and practice, often as court physicians, and listing their medical works; all this interlaced with poems and anecdotes. These volumes present the first complete and annotated translation along with a new edition of the Arabic text showing the stages in which the author composed the work. Introductory essays provide important background. The reader will find on these pages an Islamic society that worked closely with Christians and Jews, deeply committed to advancing knowledge and applying it to health and wellbeing.
In Islam, philosophy, theology and science have interacted intimately almost from the beginning and played an important part in the intellectual history of Islam. For the historian of science and for the student of philosophy, the rich literature of Islamic philosophy, theology and science has preserved much unique material. This betrays the originality of scholars, who were inspired by Greek-Hellenistic culture and its absorption in an Christian and Islamic milieu.

This series provides an outlet for the results of research on these subjects and on the history of ideas in early Islam.
Philosophy was at the basis of much of intellectual life in the Islamic Middle Ages. The study of philosophy developed considerably, as did theology and the sciences. These have in turn been crucial to the development of intellectual history in Islamic countries until today. It may even be said that for any serious and comprehensive research into the history of thought inside and outside Europe, knowledge of the Islamic sources is indispensable. Owing to the lack of printed editions of many of these Islamic sources, however, the edition and study of texts on islamic philosophy, theology and science is still a rather neglected field of research.

The present series is intended to fill this need, making the field accessible through the publication of text editions, annotated translations, collaborative volumes, handbooks, and studies of individual concept, of the lives and thought of individual historical figures, etc. Volumes in the series place the subject in the context of relevant historical and intellectual developments of the time and, where desirable, against the background of their Greek, Syriac, or Iranian origins.

The series published an average of three volumes per year over the last 5 years.
Studies and Texts in the Late Medieval and Early Modern Periods
Islamicate Intellectual History is a peer-reviewed book series that includes monographs, collective volumes, critical editions, and annotated translations of texts pertaining to the 13th to 18th centuries, with a special focus on Islamicate intellectual history, including philosophy, theology, Sufism, the whole range of the so-called occult sciences, the theory of medicine, political thought, legal theory, and adjacent areas. Its aim is to provide a dedicated publication venue for these fields, and to encourage and promote the study of the intellectual history of this period in its social and political context. The series is open to works on the history of Islamic ideas in any part of the world.
Through its chronological focus on the later middle and early modern periods, the series aims at closing the gap between the much more extensively studied history of thought of early Islam on the one hand and that of the modern period on the other, opening up a crucial period to our view.
Recent cutting-edge research has demonstrated that the intellectual history of the later middle and early modern periods deserves to be studied in its own right, as it was marked by the protracted efforts of Muslim thinkers at a re-definition of the very core of Islam in the face of fundamentally changed socio-political realities from the aftermath of the Mongol conquests down to the formation of the early modern regional states of the Ottomans, Safavids and Mughals.
This series draws attention to and provides a publishing platform for the growing number of studies in the field (monographs, biographies, and collected volumes, including conference proceedings), and promotes the study of this period through the publication of primary sources that are otherwise difficult to access both in critical editions and through annotated translations.

This series publishes an average of one volume per year.
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For over sixty years, Professor Fuat Sezgin meticulously documented the literary and scientific writings and achievements of Muslim scholars. His celebrated Geschichte des arabischen Schrifttums (GAS), the largest bio-bibliography for the Arabic literary tradition in general, and the history of science and technology in the Islamic world in particular, is still of utmost importance for the field.
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Aristoteles Semitico-Latinus founded by H.J. Drossaart Lulofs is prepared under the supervision of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences as part of the Corpus Philosophorum Medii Aevi project of the Union Académique Internationale. The Aristoteles Semitico-Latinus project envisages the publication of the Syriac, Arabic and Hebrew translations of Aristotle's works, of the Latin translations of these translations and the medieval paraphrases and commentaries made in the context of this translation tradition.
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The Islamic Translation Series aims to make scholarly Arabic texts from a wide range of disciplines available to an international, English-language readership. Comprising parallel English-Arabic texts, volumes in this series are suitable for specialists, students and all those interested in the intellectual traditions of the Islamic world.

This series was previously published by Brigham Young University Press.
The Qurʾān, the holy book of Islam proclaimed by Muḥammad, has formed the foundation of Islamic religion and society and provided an important basis for Islamic culture and politics. Texts and Studies on the Qurʾān seeks to publish a series of significant manuscripts, including monographs, textual editions, annotated translations, analytical and topical studies that address the full range of qurʾānic studies as presently articulated within contemporary research universities and institutes. Modes of inquiry and methodological perspectives may include, but are not limited to: philological studies (on grammar, linguistics, rhetoric and stylistics), historical-critical studies of early, classical and post-classical works of qurʾānic interpretation; interpretive inquiries into topics grounded in qurʾānic hermeneutics (e.g., God, prophets, this world and the hereafter, ritual and institutions); thematic and structural analyses of specific portions of the qurʾānic text; studies devoted to textual criticism and the history of the qur’ānic text; anthropological investigations of the social uses of the Qurʾān in various contexts both historical and in the present day; monographs of major Muslim commentaries on the Qurʾān; explorations of textual semantics and significance informed by the insights of contemporary literary and critical theory; inquiries into the impact of the Qur’ān on contemporary Islamic societies; explorations of the origins of the Qur’ān and its intercultural linkage with other Scriptures.

The series published an average of one volume per year over the last 5 years.
In Ibn Taymiyya and the Attributes of God (orig. published in German, 2019), Farid Suleiman pieces together, on the basis of statements scattered unsystematically over numerous individual treatises, an overall picture of the methodological foundations of Ibn Taymiyya’s doctrine of the divine attributes. He then examines how Ibn Taymiyya applies these foundational principles as exemplified in his treatment of selected divine attributes. Throughout the book, Suleiman relates Ibn Taymiyya’s positions to the larger context of Islamic intellectual history.
The book was awarded the Dissertation Prize 2019 by the Academy for Islam in Research and Society (AIWG) and the Classical Islamic Book Prize by Gorgias Press (2020).
Volume Editors: and
Religious and Intellectual Diversity in the Islamicate World and Beyond is a collection of essays in honor of Sarah Stroumsa, an eminent scholar who through the years has embodied and advanced the possibility of collaboration across borders. The volume is presented to her by scholars working on the study of the intellectual history of the Middle Ages, the intercultural contact and migration of knowledge in the Islamic world, and many other topics.

Contributors: Binyamin Abrahamov, Camilla Adang, Anna Ayse Akasoy, Aleida Assmann, Jan Assmann, Meir M. Bar-Asher, José Bellver, Menachem Ben-Sasson, Haggai Ben-Shammai, Glen W. Bowersock, Rémi Brague, Godefroid de Callataÿ, Jonathan Decter, Michael Ebstein, Hussein Fancy, Carlos Fraenkel, Gil Gambash, Robert Gleave, Miriam Goldstein, Frank Griffel, Jaakko HämeenAnttila, Steven Harvey, Warren Zev Harvey, Meir Hatina, Geoffrey Khan, Gudrun Krämer, Ehud Krinis, Y. Tzvi Langermann, Daniel J. Lasker, Reimund Leicht, Gideon Libson, Menachem Lorberbaum, Maria Mavroudi, Jon McGinnis, Omer Michaelis, Yonatan Moss, David Nirenberg, Sari Nusseibeh, Olaf Pluta, Meira Polliack, James T. Robinson, Marina Rustow, Sabine Schmidtke, Gregor Schwarb, Ahmed El Shamsy, Mark Silk, Uriel Simonsohn, Daniel De Smet, Josef Stern, Guy G. Stroumsa, Sara Sviri, Alexander Treiger, Roy Vilozny, Ronny Vollandt, Elvira Wakelnig, Paul E. Walker, David J. Wasserstein, Tanja Werthmann, Dong Xiuyuan, Arye Zoref.
Volume Editors: and
Religious and Intellectual Diversity in the Islamicate World and Beyond is a collection of essays in honor of Sarah Stroumsa, an eminent scholar who through the years has embodied and advanced the possibility of collaboration across borders. The volume is presented to her by scholars working on the study of the intellectual history of the Middle Ages, the intercultural contact and migration of knowledge in the Islamic world, and many other topics.

Contributors: Binyamin Abrahamov, Camilla Adang, Anna Ayse Akasoy, Aleida Assmann, Jan Assmann, Meir M. Bar-Asher, José Bellver, Menachem Ben-Sasson, Haggai Ben-Shammai, Glen W. Bowersock, Rémi Brague, Godefroid de Callataÿ, Jonathan Decter, Michael Ebstein, Hussein Fancy, Carlos Fraenkel, Gil Gambash, Robert Gleave, Miriam Goldstein, Frank Griffel, Jaakko HämeenAnttila, Steven Harvey, Warren Zev Harvey, Meir Hatina, Geoffrey Khan, Gudrun Krämer, Ehud Krinis, Y. Tzvi Langermann, Daniel J. Lasker, Reimund Leicht, Gideon Libson, Menachem Lorberbaum, Maria Mavroudi, Jon McGinnis, Omer Michaelis, Yonatan Moss, David Nirenberg, Sari Nusseibeh, Olaf Pluta, Meira Polliack, James T. Robinson, Marina Rustow, Sabine Schmidtke, Gregor Schwarb, Ahmed El Shamsy, Mark Silk, Uriel Simonsohn, Daniel De Smet, Josef Stern, Guy G. Stroumsa, Sara Sviri, Alexander Treiger, Roy Vilozny, Ronny Vollandt, Elvira Wakelnig, Paul E. Walker, David J. Wasserstein, Tanja Werthmann, Dong Xiuyuan, Arye Zoref.