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This volume is both a continuation of the five already published titles in the series (2011–21) and an addition to the Concise Dictionary of Novel Medical and General Hebrew Terminology from the Middle Ages. It continues mapping the medical terminology featured in medieval Hebrew medical works in order to facilitate study of medical terms that do not appear in the existing dictionaries as well as identifying the medical terminology used by specific authors and translators in order to identify anonymous medical material.

The terminology discussed in this volume has been derived from fourteen different sources, including translations of Ibn al-Jazzār’s Zād al-musāfir by Moses ibn Tibbon (Sefer Ṣedat ha-Derakhim) and the otherwise unknown Abraham ben Isaac (Sefer Ṣedah la-Oreḥim), as well as the translation of Constantine the Africanʼs Latin version (Viaticum) prepared by Do’eg ha-Edomi (Sefer Yaʾir Netiv).
In Science of the Soul in Ibn Sīnā’s Pointers and Reminders, Michael A. Rapoport provides a philological and interpretive guide for critically reading and interpreting Ibn Sīnā’s (Avicenna, d. 1037) most challenging and influential text. Rapoport argues that chapters VII-X of the Pointers present scientific explanations for phenomena related to the human soul – from intellection to divination, magic, and marvels – within the framework of Ibn Sīnā’s Metaphysics of the Rational Soul. This book dispels widespread notions that the Pointers represents Ibn Sīnā’s mystical or Sufi philosophy and therefore stands apart from the rest of his corpus.
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For over sixty years, Professor Fuat Sezgin meticulously documented the literary and scientific writings and achievements of Muslim scholars. His celebrated Geschichte des arabischen Schrifttums (GAS), the largest bio-bibliography for the Arabic literary tradition in general, and the history of science and technology in the Islamic world in particular, is still of utmost importance for the field.
The study of Islamicate intellectual history has witnessed a rapid growth of scholarship on post-classical thinkers and especially on Fakhr al-Dīn al-Rāzī (d. 1210 CE), one of the leading theologians and philosophers of his time. However, there is presently a lack of methodological tools and reference works in Rāzī studies. This book is the first bibliographical work entirely devoted to this thinker. It surveys the modern historiography on Rāzī from the nineteenth century onward and includes more than 1000 specialized entries written in European languages, Arabic, Persian, and Turkish. The bibliography also provides a preface, an introductory essay, annotations to the entries, and various indices to help students and experts navigate the complex field of Rāzī studies.
Volume 5: Unknown Arabic Manuscripts from Eight Centuries, Including one Hebrew and Two Ethiopian Manuscripts: Daiber Collection III
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From the Greeks to the Arabs and Beyond written by Hans Daiber, is a six volume collection of Daiber’s scattered writings, journal articles, essays and encyclopaedia entries on Greek-Syriac-Arabic translations, Islamic theology and Sufism, the history of science, Islam in Europe, manuscripts and the history of oriental studies. The collection contains published (since 1967) and unpublished works in English, German, Arabic, Persian and Turkish, including editions of Arabic and Syriac texts. The publication mirrors the intercultural character of Islamic thought and sheds new light on many aspects ranging from the Greek pre-Socratics to the Malaysian philosopher Naquib al-Attas. A main concern is the interpretation of texts in print or in manuscripts, culminating in two catalogues (Vol. V and VI), which contain descriptions of newly discovered, mainly Arabic, manuscripts in all fields.
Vol. I: Graeco-Syriaca and Arabica.
Vol. II: Islamic Philosophy.
Vol. III: From God’s Wisdom to Science: A. Islamic Theology and Sufism; B. History of Science.
Vol. IV: Islam, Europe and Beyond: A. Islam and Middle Ages; B. Manuscripts – a Basis of Knowledge and Science; C. History of the Discipline; D. Obituaries; E. Indexes.
Vol. V: Unknown Arabic Manuscripts from Eight Centuries – Including one Hebrew and Two Ethiopian Manuscripts: Daiber Collection III.
Vol. VI: Arabic, Syriac, Persian and Latin Manuscripts on Philosophy, Theology, Science and Literature. Films and Offprints: Daiber Collection IV.
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Ce volume présente la toute première édition critique de la Rhétorique d’Aristote dans sa version arabo-latine réalisée par Hermann l’Allemand (m. 1272). Il propose également une étude complète de la tradition manuscrite du texte latin, et les principes adoptés dans l’édition, qui prennent en compte la version arabe de la Rhétorique. Une brève présentation du texte vient compléter ce volume.

This volume contains the first critical edition of Aristotle’s Rhetoric in its Arabo-Latin translation made by Hermann the German (d. 1272). It also contains a full study of the manuscript tradition of the Latin text and sets out the principles used in the edition, which takes account of the Arabic version of the Rhetoric. A brief presentation of the text completes the volume.
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Aristoteles Semitico-Latinus founded by H.J. Drossaart Lulofs is prepared under the supervision of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences as part of the Corpus Philosophorum Medii Aevi project of the Union Académique Internationale. The Aristoteles Semitico-Latinus project envisages the publication of the Syriac, Arabic and Hebrew translations of Aristotle's works, of the Latin translations of these translations and the medieval paraphrases and commentaries made in the context of this translation tradition.
In Islam, philosophy, theology and science have interacted intimately almost from the beginning and played an important part in the intellectual history of Islam. For the historian of science and for the student of philosophy, the rich literature of Islamic philosophy, theology and science has preserved much unique material. This betrays the originality of scholars, who were inspired by Greek-Hellenistic culture and its absorption in an Christian and Islamic milieu.

This series provides an outlet for the results of research on these subjects and on the history of ideas in early Islam.
Philosophy was at the basis of much of intellectual life in the Islamic Middle Ages. The study of philosophy developed considerably, as did theology and the sciences. These have in turn been crucial to the development of intellectual history in Islamic countries until today. It may even be said that for any serious and comprehensive research into the history of thought inside and outside Europe, knowledge of the Islamic sources is indispensable. Owing to the lack of printed editions of many of these Islamic sources, however, the edition and study of texts on islamic philosophy, theology and science is still a rather neglected field of research.

The present series is intended to fill this need, making the field accessible through the publication of text editions, annotated translations, collaborative volumes, handbooks, and studies of individual concept, of the lives and thought of individual historical figures, etc. Volumes in the series place the subject in the context of relevant historical and intellectual developments of the time and, where desirable, against the background of their Greek, Syriac, or Iranian origins.

The series published an average of three volumes per year over the last 5 years.
Arabic, Syriac, Persian and Latin Manuscripts on Philosophy, Theology, Science and Literature. Films and Offprints: Daiber Collection IV.
Author:
From the Greeks to the Arabs and Beyond written by Hans Daiber, is a six volume collection of Daiber’s scattered writings, journal articles, essays and encyclopaedia entries on Greek-Syriac-Arabic translations, Islamic theology and Sufism, the history of science, Islam in Europe, manuscripts and the history of oriental studies. The collection contains published (since 1967) and unpublished works in English, German, Arabic, Persian and Turkish, including editions of Arabic and Syriac texts. The publication mirrors the intercultural character of Islamic thought and sheds new light on many aspects ranging from the Greek pre-Socratics to the Malaysian philosopher Naquib al-Attas. A main concern is the interpretation of texts in print or in manuscripts, culminating in two catalogues (Vol. V and VI), which contain descriptions of newly discovered, mainly Arabic, manuscripts in all fields.
Vol. I: Graeco-Syriaca and Arabica.
Vol. II: Islamic Philosophy.
Vol. III: From God’s Wisdom to Science: A. Islamic Theology and Sufism; B. History of Science.
Vol. IV: Islam, Europe and Beyond: A. Islam and Middle Ages; B. Manuscripts – a Basis of Knowledge and Science; C. History of the Discipline; D. Obituaries; E. Indexes.
Vol. V: Unknown Arabic Manuscripts from Eight Centuries – Including one Hebrew and Two Ethiopian Manuscripts: Daiber Collection III.
Vol. VI: Arabic, Syriac, Persian and Latin Manuscripts on Philosophy, Theology, Science and Literature. Films and Offprints: Daiber Collection IV.
Author:
Tianyi Zhang offers in this study an innovative philosophical reconstruction of Shihāb al-Dīn al-Suhrawardī’s (d. 1191) Illuminationism. Commonly portrayed as either a theosophist or an Avicennian in disguise, Suhrawardī appears here as an original and hardheaded philosopher who adopts mysticism as a tool for philosophical investigation.
Zhang makes use of Plato’s cave allegory to explain Suhrawardī’s Illuminationist project. Focusing on three areas—the theory of presential knowledge, the ontological discussion of mental considerations, and Light Metaphysics—Zhang convincingly reveals the Nominalist and Existential nature of Illuminationism and thereby proposes a new way of understanding how Suhrawardī’s central philosophical ideas cohere.