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From Volume 7 onwards, new format with a more current and topical focus on a country level.

The Yearbook of Muslims in Europe is an essential resource for analysis of Europe's dynamic Muslim populations. Featuring up-to-date research from forty-three European countries, this comprehensive reference work summarizes significant activities, trends, and developments.

Each new volume reports on the most current information available from surveyed countries, offering an annual overview of statistical and demographic data, topical issues of public debate, shifting transnational networks, change to domestic and legal policies, and major activities in Muslim organisations and institutions. Supplementary data is gathered from a variety of sources and evaluated according to its reliability.

In addition to offering a relevant framework for original research, the Yearbook of Muslims in Europe provides an invaluable source of reference for government and NGO officials, journalists, policy-makers, and related research institutions.
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Daniel Varisco

Varisco’s Culture Still Matters: Notes from the Field is on the relationship between ethnographic fieldwork and the culture concept in the ongoing debate over the future of anthropology, drawing on the history of both concepts. Despite being the major social science that offers a methodology and tools to understand diverse cultures worldwide, scholars within and outside anthropology have attacked this field for all manner of sins, including fostering colonialism and essentializing others. This book revitalizes constructive debate of this vibrant field’s history, methods and contributions, drawing on the author’s ethnographic experience in Yemen. It covers complicated theoretical concepts about culture and their critiques in readable prose, accessible to students and interested social scientists in other fields.

With forewords from Bryan S. Turner and Anouar Majid.
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Waqf in Zaydī Yemen

Legal Theory, Codification, and Local Practice

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Eirik Hovden

Islamic foundations ( waqf, pl. awqāf) have been an integral part of Yemeni society both for managing private wealth and as a legal frame for charity and public infrastructure. This book focuses on four socially grounded fields of legal knowledge: fiqh, codification, individual waqf cases, and everyday waqf related knowledge. It combines textual analysis with ethnography seeking to understand how Islamic law is approached, used, produced and validated in selected topics of waqf law where the tensions are strong between ideals and pragmatic rules. The study analyses central Zaydī fiqh works such as the Sharḥ al-azhār-cluster, in addition to imamic decrees, fatwās, and waqf documents, mostly from Zaydī, Northern Yemen.
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Andrea Brigaglia

Abstract

This paper contains a transliteration in Latin script, an English translation and an analysis of Al-Ṣābūn al-Muṭahhir (“The Cleansing Soap”), a poem on tarbiya (spiritual training) and ma‘rifa (gnosis) originally written in the Hausa language using Arabic script by Muḥammad Balarabe (d. 1967) of Shellen, in Adamawa, Nigeria. Balarabe was a Sufi of the Tijāniyya order affiliated to the Jamā‘at al-fayḍa of the Senegalese Ibrāhīm Niasse (d. 1975). In style and content, Balarabe’s poem serves as a corrective to some of the observations on Hausa Sufi poetry made by Mervyn Hiskett in his classic 1975 monograph. Drawing attention to the philosophical background of the poem (a dense web of doctrines that integrates Akbarī Sufism and Aš‘arī theology), the paper also suggests that some of the generalizations made by Hiskett in a 1980 article on the Hausa literature produced by the Jamā‘at al-fayḍa are in need of revision.1

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Orit Bashkin

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Vika Gardner, E. Carolina Mayes and Salman Hameed

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Internet videos are one form of “new media” that enable us to study the movement of narratives. Lectures addressing both Islam and science appear often in these videos. One of the most popular speakers in this material is Dr. Zakir Naik, a Muslim preacher from India. Naik’s lectures often interpret select modern scientific discoveries to “prove” the divine origin of the Qurʾān, a pseudo-scientific endeavor known as iʿjāz ʿilmī. This paper contextualizes Naik’s branding and how he draws upon the authority of science and Western scientists. Naik has been able to trade on both his medical training and his South Asian roots by combining formulaic presentations from famous pro-Islamic Westerners such as Dr. Maurice Bucaille with stylings learned from preachers such as Ahmad Deedat. Garnering both devoted fans and vociferous critics, Naik has developed into a recognizable cultural symbol with his own transnational authority.