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This book examines material and multi-sensorial expressions of Shiʿi Islam in diverse, and understudied demographic and geographic contexts.It engages with conceptual debates and makes several propositions that push the frontiers of scholarship on Islamic and Religious Studies, Material Religion, Heritage Studies, and Anthropology and Sociology of Religion.The contributions presented in this volume demonstrate how material things and less thing-like materialities make the praesentia and potentia of the Sacred tangible, how they cultivate intimate relations between human and more-than-human beings, and how they act as links and gateways to the Elsewhere and Otherworldly. The volume posits that materialities of religion are integral to processes of heritagization shaped by competing social and political actors involved in the construction and canonization of religious—in this case, Shiʿi—heritage.
V. F. Minorsky and C. J. Edmonds Correspondence (1928-1965)
This volume is an annotated correspondence, of nearly forty years, between two prominent Orientalists. The letters cover a range of topics related to the Zagros Mountains, its peoples, their history, culture, and languages. They also offer a glimpse into the personal lives and careers of the two scholars, give valuable insights on the development of the field of Kurdish Studies, and to an extent outline the contours of what the two referred to as Zagrology.
Iran and the Caucasus Monographs is a double-anonymous peer-reviewed book series that covers recent findings in Irano-Indian, Caucasian, Near-Eastern, Armenian, and Turkic studies. The focus will be on linguistics and philology, history, archaeology, anthropology, history of religions, art history, as well as ethnopolitical and security issues concerning the said regions. The Series includes short monographs presenting original research, revised high-quality theses, commissioned edited volumes, festschrifts, opera minora of prominent scholars, and scholarly translations with commentaries and appropriate apparatus. The predominant language of the volumes in the Series is English, but German and French submissions are welcome too.
Author:
In Exercising Authority and Representing Rule, András Barati examines twenty-two hitherto unpublished Persian royal decrees issued by various rulers of eighteenth-century Iran and Afghanistan kept at the Āstān-i Quds-i Rażawī in Mashhad. Considering the paucity of primary sources from this period due to relatively frequent political turmoils, he aims to improve this situation by offering the transcription and translation of these original documents as well as a commentary concerning the textual elements, external aspects, and content of the decrees. Making use of previously published documents, András Barati presents the first substantial study on post-Safavid eighteenth-century diplomatics and addresses several issues related to the political, economic, and administrative history of the region in the early modern period.
Author:
These essays are the revised and updated version of four lectures given in the Yarshater Lecture Series, at SOAS in London in 2013. They concern some aspects of the arts from pre-modern Iran and India, namely, the “making of” of Persian illustrated manuscripts, the iconography of Kashan wares, the use and re-use of luster tiles in Ilkhanid Iran, and the glazed tiles made in three Indian sultanates (Delhi, Bengal and Malwa). These four topics share concepts of influence and impact, although inflected on different modes. The productions they embody represent many poles of influence, even if working on different scales, from the extensive diffusion of products, techniques, and systems to almost isolated productions.
C.A. Storey’s Persian Literature: A Bio-Bibliographical Survey is the most authoritative reference work on the Persian written tradition, offering the names of authors and the titles of those of their works that have survived in the Persian language. Storey’s work is for the Persian manuscript tradition what Brockelmann’s is for the Arab world.
Volume I.1: Qurʾānic Literature, History, and Biography
Volume I.2: Biography, Additions, and Corrections
Volume II: Mathematics; Weights, and Measures; Astronomy, and Astrology; Geography; Medicine; Encyclopaedias, and Miscellanies; Arts and Crafts, Science, Occult Arts
Volume III: Lexicography; Grammar; Prosody, and Poetics; Rhetoric, Riddles, and Chronograms; Ornate Prose; Proverbs: Tales
Volume IV: Law; Tradition; Religion, Sufism, Baha’ism, Prayers; Hinduism; Translations from Sanskrit, Hindi, and other Indian Languages, Ethics; Philosophy; Logic
Volume V: Poetry of the Pre-Mongol Period
Editor:
The Encyclopædia Iranica is dedicated to the study of Iranian civilization in the Middle East, the Caucasus, Central Asia, and the Indian Subcontinent. It also includes scholarly articles related to the reciprocal influences between Persia and its neighbors, extending from pre-history to the present. The disciplines represented include: anthropology, archaeology, geography, art history, ethnology, sociology, economics, history of religion, philosophy, mysticism, history of science and medicine, Islamic history, botany, zoology, folklore, development of agriculture and industry, political science, international relations, and diplomatic history.
Encyclopædia Iranica is a comprehensive academic reference work dedicated to the study of Iranian civilization in the Middle East, the Caucasus, Central Asia, and the Indian subcontinent.
Author:
In Relational Iconography: Representational Culture at the Qaraquyunlu and Aqquyunlu Courts (853 / 1449 CE to 907 / 1501 CE), Georg Leube engages with courtly representation from an iconographical perspective, tracing the intersecting agencies of courtly actors negotiating multiple normativities and traditions. While the courtly culture of the Qaraquyunlu and Aqquyunlu dynasties (15th century C.E.) is commonly interpreted as an intermezzo in Persianate and Islamicate cultural history, it is here framed as an ideal field to explore a relational approach that challenges established dichotomies and ideal types.
By reading multiple mediums and discourses into each other, Georg Leube shows how courtly performance is rooted in iconographical repertoires that resonated with different networks and groups inside the 'Turkmen' realms.