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Author: Katrin Buchmann
Buchmann analyses the work of UK, German, Danish and Swedish embassies in the USA and China on climate change in the late 2000s and early 2010s. She relates which coalitions and narratives embassies sought to develop to convince China and the United States that a more progressive climate policy was possible, to achieve gains supporting an agreement under the UNFCCC. This book shows that a key interpretation of climate diplomacy was selling/trade: Europe selling technology “solutions” to solve climate change. In this narrative, Europe has already done what needs to be done and outsourcing of production to China e.g. is ignored. In the USA, embassies entered coalitions with states, faith groups and the military, arguing that a more progressive climate policy was mandated by either God or security concerns. State politicians, including Democrats, often actually didn’t implement any climate policies. Any gains were reversed through climate denial lobbying funded by corporations. Embassies did not address this.
Editors / Translators: Laura Hostetler and Xuemei Wu
Commissioned by the Qianlong emperor in 1751, the Qing Imperial Illustrations of Tributary Peoples (Huang Qing zhigong tu 皇清職貢圖), is a captivating work of art and an ideological statement of universal rule best understood as a cultural cartography of empire. This translation of the ethnographic texts accompanied by a full-color reproduction of Xie Sui’s (謝遂) hand-painted scroll helps us to understand the conceptualization of imperial tributary relationships the work embodies as rooted in both dynastic history and the specifics of Qing rule.
If you want to better understand not only international but also social diplomacy, then this book is for you. If you are a practitioner in traditional diplomacy or a person who want to apply diplomatic ideas and methods in social life, you can find many useful insights in this original work. A scholar and experienced diplomat, the author argues that international and social diplomacy can learn from each other. He explores genuine diplomacy as a goodwill mission, constructive engagement, and dialogical interaction that can help states, non-state organizations, companies, groups, individuals, and their aggregations to create public goods and make positive social changes.
Editor: Jan Melissen
We encourage you to explore our Brill journal The Hague Journal of Diplomacy.

Diplomatic Studies (DIST) is a peer-reviewed book series that encourages original work on the theory and practice, processes and outcomes of diplomacy. It aims to advance the understanding of the importance of diplomacy to international relations. The broad scope of the series reflects the interdisciplinary and inclusive nature of diplomatic studies.

Diplomatic Studies welcomes monographs and edited volumes, including contemporary, historical and future-oriented academic work. The series is receptive to a wide array of methodologies. Books in the series cover a variety of forms of diplomatic practice. We particularly welcome excellent academic work that is breaking new empirical ground or that is theoretically or methodologically innovative. Manuscripts should, however, meet a minimum length requirement of 80,000 words.

The book series is edited by The Hague Journal of Diplomacy’s co-Editor-in-Chief, Jan Melissen. In line with the journal, Diplomatic Studies publishes research that meets the highest standards of excellence on the theory, practice, and techniques of diplomacy.

Visit also our journal The Hague Journal of Diplomacy.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the publisher Jason Prevost. Please direct all other correspondence to Associate Editor Athina Dimitriou.
Series Editor: Jennifer Cassidy
Brill Research Perspectives in Diplomacy and Foreign Policy provides an open forum for reference publication, critical analysis, and cutting-edge research on contemporary issues of diplomacy and foreign policy. By emphasizing theory-practice integration, multidisciplinarity, and accessibility of content, the series positions itself at the center of conceptual debates that frame the theory, practice, and transformation of 21st-century diplomatic relations. The series promotes creative, problem-solving approaches for the management of peaceful change in transnational affairs as a contribution to global governance.

Each installment is a focused monograph of approximately 30,000-40,000 words (70-100 pages) presenting the state of the art in a specific diplomatic area in close combination with critical analysis, research, and policy implications.

Brill Research Perspectives in Diplomacy and Foreign Policy’s primary readership includes diplomatic scholars, international relations analysts, graduate and undergraduate students of international affairs, foreign policy decision makers, international NGOs, practitioners, and educators in diplomatic academies.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the publisher Jason Prevost. Please direct all other correspondence to Associate Editor Debbie de Wit.
A Small Neutral State’s Visions of Modern War
Author: Wim Klinkert
Total War was the core concept around which military thought revolved during the interwar period. Total War was also a multifaceted, confusing concept that affected both civilian and military life. How did small states conceive of their place in such a destructive war? Did they close their eyes, relying on international law to protect them, or did they seek creative solutions?
This book examines how Dutch officers, in the shadow of three great powers, considered their military future, analysing the impact of European military ideas on a small state. This approach offers a new perspective on interwar dealing with assumptions about a new world war.
International Intervention and the Formation of a Fragmented State
Author: Sara de Simone
How did South Sudan become one of the most striking examples of state-building failure and state collapse after years of international support? What went wrong in the state-building enterprise? How did external intervention overlap and intertwine with local processes of accumulation of power and of state formation? This book addresses these questions analysing the intersection between international and local actors and processes. Based on original ethnographic and archival data, it provides a unique account of how state-building resources were captured and manipulated by local actors at various levels, contributing to the deepening of ethnic fragmentation and the politicization of ethnicity.
Co-constructing NGO Presence in Rural Malawi
Author: Thomas McNamara
In rural Northern Malawi, villagers co-construct meanings for NGOs’ projects and resources. NGOs and their staff are invoked within, yet simultaneously influence, intra-community debates. This book explores NGO presence through detailing relationships, personhoods and social changes within a rural community. It argues that NGOs’ projects have less impact on many Malawians’ lives than the ways their presence encourages villagers to re-image development and renegotiate intra-community obligations and entitlements. The book examines moral economies and discourses of development by detailing how development narratives are built around the symbols development actors emit. It also investigates the intra-village social lives of development brokers.
In this groundbreaking book, Andrey Makarychev approaches populism through a critical biopolitical lens and shows that populist narratives are grounded intrinsically in corporeality, sexuality, health, bodily life and religious practices. The author demonstrates that populism is a phenomenon deeply rooted in mass culture. He compares three countries -- Estonia, Ukraine and Russia--that all share post-Soviet experiences offering a broad spectrum of populist discourses. The three case studies display the interconnection between biopower and populism through references to culture, media, art, theatrical performances and literature, raising new questions and directions for understanding traditional accounts of populism.