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The Yearbook of Islamic and Middle Eastern Law (YIMEL) is the leading English language journal covering contemporary Islamic laws and laws of the Middle East. Practitioners and academics dealing with the Middle East can turn to YIMEL for an instant source of information on the developments in the Middle East region and wider Muslim world. YIMEL covers Islamic and non-Islamic legal subjects, including the laws themselves, of some twenty Arab and other Islamic countries. Focusing on YIMEL's role in publishing and disseminating ground-breaking and novel research on Islamic law, Volume 19 includes a Special Edition on the theme of Islamic Law and Empire consisting of a dedicated Preface and articles in Part I, as well as other contributions on legal developments in the Middle East and South Asia, important judgements and book reviews, assembled in Part II. The publication's practical features include: - articles on current topics, - the text of a selection of important case judgments, - book reviews.
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In Women and Property Rights in Indonesian Islamic Contexts, eight scholars of Indonesian Islam examine women’s access to property in law courts and in village settings. The authors draw on fieldwork from across the archipelago to analyse how judges and ordinary people apply interpretations of law, religion, and gender in deliberating and deciding in property disputes that arise at moments of marriage, divorce, and death. The chapters go beyond the world of legal and scriptural texts to ask how women in fact fare in these contexts. Women’s capabilities and resources in Indonesia, the world’s largest Muslim society and one with distinctive traditions of legal and social life, provides a critical knowledge base for advancing our understanding of the social life of Islamic law. Contributors: Nanda Amalia, John R. Bowen, Tutik Hamidah, Abidin Nurdin, Euis Nurlaelawati, Arskal Salim, Rosmah Tami & Atun Wardatun.
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International Law and Islam

Historical Explorations

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International Law and Islam: Historical Explorations offers a unique opportunity to examine the Islamic contribution to the development of International Law in a historical perspective. The role of Islam in its various intellectual, political and legal manifestations within the history of international law is part of the exciting intellectual renovation of international and global legal history in the dawn of the twenty-first century. The present volume is an invitation to engage with this thriving development after ‘generations of prejudiced writing’ regarding the notable contribution of Islam to international law and its history.
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Qurʾān Quotations Preserved on Papyrus Documents, 7th-10th Centuries is the first book on the Qurʾān’s Sitz im Leben, i.e. on how the Qurʾān was quoted in Arabic original letters, legal deeds, and amulets. Qurʾān Quotations also serves as an in-depth exploration of the radiocarbon dating of documents and Qurʾānic manuscripts.

Contributors: Ursula Bsees; Tobias J. Jocham; Andreas Kaplony; Michael Josef Marx, Daniel Potthast; Leonora Sonego; Eva Mira Youssef-Grob.
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Damaris Wilmers

In Beyond Schools: Muḥammad b. Ibrāhīm al-Wazīrʼs (d. 840/1436) Epistemology of Ambiguity, Damaris Wilmers provides the first extensive analysis of Ibn al-Wazīrʼs thought and its role in the “Sunnisation of the Zaydiyya”, emphasizing its significance for conflicts between schools of thought and law beyond the Yemeni context. Contrasting Ibn al-Wazīrʼs works with those of his Zaydi contemporary Aḥmad b. Yaḥyā b. al-Murtaḍā, Damaris Wilmers offers a study of a number of heretofore unedited texts from 9th/15th century Yemen when Zaydi identity was challenged by an increasing theological and legal diversity. She shows how Ibn al-Wazīr, who has been classed with different schools, actually de-emphasized school affiliation and developed an integrative approach based on a unique theory of knowledge.
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Waqf in Zaydī Yemen

Legal Theory, Codification, and Local Practice

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Eirik Hovden

Islamic foundations ( waqf, pl. awqāf) have been an integral part of Yemeni society both for managing private wealth and as a legal frame for charity and public infrastructure. This book focuses on four socially grounded fields of legal knowledge: fiqh, codification, individual waqf cases, and everyday waqf related knowledge. It combines textual analysis with ethnography seeking to understand how Islamic law is approached, used, produced and validated in selected topics of waqf law where the tensions are strong between ideals and pragmatic rules. The study analyses central Zaydī fiqh works such as the Sharḥ al-azhār-cluster, in addition to imamic decrees, fatwās, and waqf documents, mostly from Zaydī, Northern Yemen.
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Sprachphilosophie in der islamischen Rechtstheorie

Zur avicennischen Klassifikation der Bezeichnung bei Faḫr ad-dīn ar-Rāzī (gest. 1210)

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Nora Kalbarczyk

In Sprachphilosophie in der islamischen Rechtstheorie untersucht Nora Kalbarczyk das bedeutende rechtstheoretische Werk al-Maḥṣūl fī ʿilm uṣūl al-fiqh von Faḫr ad-dīn ar-Rāzī (gest. 1210). Anhand einer detaillierten Analyse der sprachtheoretischen Abhandlung dieses Werks beleuchtet sie den Einfluss der philosophischen Tradition auf die islamische Rechtstheorie ( uṣūl al-fiqh) in der sogenannten post-avicennischen Ära (11.-14 Jh.). Im Zentrum steht dabei eine Klassifikation der Bezeichnung ( dalāla), die sich auf Ibn Sīnā (lat. Avicenna, gest. 1037) zurückführen lässt: Ein Wort kann eine Bedeutung auf dem Wege der Kongruenz ( muṭābaqa), der Inklusion ( taḍammun) oder der Implikation ( iltizām) bezeichnen. Die Autorin zeigt auf, wie Faḫr ad-dīn ar-Rāzī auf der Grundlage der avicennischen Bezeichnungstheorie ein hermeneutisches Instrumentarium entwickelt, das nicht nur für die arabische Philosophie selbst relevant ist, sondern auch für verschiedene Fragestellungen der islamischen Rechtstheorie fruchtbar gemacht wird.

In Sprachphilosophie in der islamischen Rechtstheorie Nora Kalbarczyk examines the influential jurisprudential work al-Maḥṣūl fī ʿilm uṣūl al-fiqh (d. 1210). By means of a detailed analysis of the linguistic treatise of this work she highlights the impact of the philosophical tradition on Islamic legal theory (uṣūl al-fiqh) in the so-called post-Avicennian era (11th-14th c.). Her main focus lies on a classification of signification ( dalāla) that can be traced back to Ibn Sīnā (lat. Avicenna, d. 1037): a word may signify a meaning by way of congruence ( muṭābaqa), containment ( taḍammun) or implication ( iltizām). The author shows how Faḫr ad-dīn ar-Rāzī develops – on the basis of the Avicennian theory of signification – a hermeneutic toolbox which is not only relevant in the context of Arabic philosophy but also useful for different questions of Islamic legal theory.
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Charles L.O. Buderi and Luciana T. Ricart