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Steffen Bay Rasmussen

In The Ideas and Practices of the European Union’s Structural Antidiplomacy, Steffen Bay Rasmussen offers a comprehensive analysis of EU diplomacy that goes beyond the functioning of the European External Action Service and discusses the sui generis nature of the EU as a diplomatic actor, the forms of bilateral and multilateral representation as well as the actor identity, founding ideas and meta-practices of EU diplomacy. The book employs a novel theoretical approach that distinguishes the social structures of diplomacy from the practices and meta-practices of diplomacy. Comparing EU diplomacy to the two theoretically constructed ideal types of Westphalian diplomacy and utopian antidiplomacy, Steffen Bay Rasmussen concludes that the EU’s international agency constitutes a new form of diplomacy called structural antidiplomacy.
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Naomi S.S. Jacobs

In Delicious Prose: Reading the Tale of Tobit with Food and Drink, Naomi S.S. Jacobs explores how the numerous references to food, drink, and their consumption within The Book of Tobit help tell its story, promote righteous deeds and encourage resistance against a hostile dominant culture. Jacobs’ commentary includes up-to-date analyses of issues of translation, text-criticism, source criticism, redaction criticism, and issues of class and gender. Jacobs situates Tobit within a wide range of ancient writings sacred to Jews and Christians as well as writing and customs from the Ancient Near East, Ugarit, Greece, Rome, including a treasure trove of information about ancient foodways and medicine.
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Political Economy of Globalization and China's Options offers the political economy of globalization and China’s options in response to globalization’s retrogression, and the construction of world order. What are the strategies for upgrading the competitiveness of an emerging major power? Why does world need a new concept of openness? What are the four major challenges for the world economy? How do Chinese scholars think of in an “Anti-Globalization” environment? What are the five major objectives of global politics? Besides answering these basic questions, we will also consider other issues: the triangular relationship among China, the United States, and Russia; Rise of China and transformation of international order; understanding nuclear security and safety issues from the perspective of global governance.
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In Challenging the Status Quo: Diversity, Democracy, and Equality in the 21st Century, David G. Embrick, Sharon M. Collins, and Michelle Dodson have compiled the latest ideas and scholarship in the area of diversity and inclusion. The contributors in this edited book offer critical analyses on many aspects of diversity as it pertains to institutional policies, practices, discourse, and beliefs. The book is broken down into 19 chapters over 7 sections that cover: policies and politics; pedagogy and higher education; STEM; religion; communities; complex organizations; and discourse and identity. Collectively, these chapters contribute to answering three main questions: 1) what, ultimately, does diversity mean; 2) what are the various mechanisms by which institutions understand and use diversity; and 3) and why is it important for us to rethink diversity?

Contributors: Sharla Alegria, Joyce M. Bell, Sharon M. Collins, Ellen Berrey, Enobong Hannah Branch, Meghan A. Burke, Tiffany Davis, Michele C. Deramo, Michelle Dodson, David G. Embrick, Edward Orozco Flores, Emma González-Lesser, Bianca Gonzalez-Sobrino, Matthew W. Hughey, Paul R. Ketchum, Megan Klein, Michael Kreiter, Marie des Neiges Léonard, Wendy Leo Moore, Shan Mukhtar, Antonia Randolph, Victor Erik Ray, Arthur Scarritt, Laurie Cooper Stoll.
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Converts in the Dead Sea Scrolls

The Gēr and Mutable Ethnicity

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Carmen Palmer

Converts in the Dead Sea Scrolls examines the meaning of the term gēr in the Dead Sea Scrolls. While often interpreted as a resident alien, this study of the term as it is employed within scriptural rewriting in the Dead Sea Scrolls concludes that the gēr is a Gentile convert to Judaism. Contrasting the gēr in the Dead Sea Scrolls against scriptural predecessors, Carmen Palmer finds that a conversion is possible by means of mutable ethnicity. Furthermore, mutable features of ethnicity in the sectarian movement affiliated with the Dead Sea Scrolls include shared kinship, connection to land, and common culture in the practice of circumcision. The sectarian movement is not as closed toward Gentiles as has been commonly considered.
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Machiavelli on Freedom and Civil Conflict

An Historical and Medical Approach to Political Thinking

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Marie Gaille

In Machiavelli on Freedom and Civil Conflict: An Historical and Medical Approach to Political Thinking, Marie Gaille rethinks Machiavelli’s conception of civil conflict. In complete opposition to the common view of Machiavelli as a defender of tyranny, this analysis brings new elements to the forefront: the use of medical metaphors to describe the body politic, its historical lifespan and its institutional arrangement. This study is also based on a comprehensive approach to Machiavelli’s writings, including his most famous works, but also The History of Florence, his correspondence, and his political, military and diplomatic reports. This study allows Marie Gaille to propose an original assessment of Machiavelli’s insights for contemporary conceptions of democracy.

This is a revised and translated edition of Conflit Civil et Liberté: la Politique Machiavelienne entre Histoire et Médecine, first published in French, in 2004 by Éditions Honoré Champion.
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Communication decisively impacts upon all our lives. This inherent need to connect may either be soothing or painful, a source of intimate understanding or violent discord. Consequently, how it is brokered is challenging and often crucial in situations where those involved have quite different ways of being in and seeing the world. Good communication is equated with skills that intentionally facilitate change, the realisation of desirable outcomes and the improvement of human situations. Withdrawal of communication, or its intentional manipulation, provokes misunderstanding, mistrust, and precipitates the decline into disorder. This international collection of work specifically interrogates conflict as an essential outworking of communication, and suggests that understanding of communication’s potency in contexts of conflict can directly influence reciprocally positive outcomes.
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Gražina Čiuladienė

Abstract

This chapter presents a study designed to explore the role that age and power difference plays in relation to the types of distributive conflict resolution strategies, specifically forcing, avoiding, and accommodating. The study reports data from a student conflict resolution skills survey collected by the author during two academic years between 2012 and 2014. The sample comprised 238 students from Mykolas Romeris University and 586 pupils in grades seven to nine from six schools in Lithuania. The results show that older adolescents tend to report higher rates of direct accommodating and avoiding. Younger adolescents tend to report higher rates of direct humiliating, damaging, and direct and indirect physical and verbal offensive contending. The analyses show no age impact on indirect humiliation and damaging. Overall there was a greater use of accommodating strategies in the unequal power dyads, and there were no meaningful differences in the use of avoiding strategies. Although offensive contending and direct humiliating contending were more frequent in the dyads of equal power, power dyads seem to have no impact on indirect damaging and humiliating.

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Peter Bray

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Counselling invites participants into a safely controlled and closed environment, in which personal realities may be not only communicated reflectively but also challenged. This chapter suggests that the counselling space can be viewed as a socio-professional stage upon which beginning counsellors make and rehearse performance works with their client/audiences. Prompted by an idealised model of the counselling persona, and armed with theory and therapeutic interventions, these performances tentatively present the new counsellor’s self, a self initially dissonant and unfamiliar. It is a performance that, to be professionally effective, relies upon an appropriate presentation of self, a clearly communicated script, and collaborative engagement in a setting that simultaneously meets client needs and expectations, and grows trust and understanding between the counsellor/actor and the client/audience. In addition, it argues that counselling relationships, although founded upon truly fundamental human values, conditions, and aspirations, are only mutually believable performances in a defined temporal and relational space. Indeed, for student counsellors, their early therapeutic encounters may seem just that. Constrained by the need to maintain harmonious relations that enhance client disclosure and therapeutic change, beginning counsellors may feel that to present their actual selves, a self incongruent with counsellor identity and the needs of the client, might be counter-productive. Consequently, to address this service relational they may withhold self in favour of a more acceptable, personally safer, yet less effective counsellor persona. Reframing sociologist Erving Goffman’s dramaturgy of self presentation and Carl Rogers’s theory of self, this chapter considers the inner conflict and development of beginning counsellors as they wrestle to reveal acceptable professional personas.1 Within the ‘We all act better than we know how,’ hypothesis the literal tension between playing and becoming suggests a normative phase in counsellor development, and invites further comment upon the humanistic counsellor’s struggle toward authenticity in the therapeutic relational.2