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Young People and the Politics of Outrage and Hope brings together contributions from international youth studies experts who ask how young people and institutions are responding to high levels of unemployment, student debt, housing costs that lock many out of home ownership, and the challenge to find meaningful modes of participation in neo-liberal social contexts. Contributors including Henry Giroux, Anita Harris and Judith Bessant, draw on a range of theoretical, methodological and empirical work to identify and debate some of the challenges and opportunities of the politics of outrage and hope that should accompany academic, community and political discussions about the futures that young people will inherit and make.
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Welcoming Ruin

The Civil Rights Act of 1875

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Alan Friedlander and Richard Allan Gerber

The Civil Rights Act of 1875, enacted March 1, 1875, banned racial discrimination in public accommodations – hotels, public conveyances and places of public amusement. In 1883 the U.S. Supreme Court declared the law unconstitutional, ushering in generations of segregation until 1964. This first full-length study of the Act covers the years of debates in Congress and some forty state studies of the midterm elections of 1874 in which many supporting Republicans lost their seats. They returned to pass the Act in the short session of Congress. This book utilizes an army of primary sources from unpublished manuscripts, rare newspaper accounts, memoir materials and official documents to demonstrate that Republicans were motivated primarily by an ideology that civil equality would produce social order in the defeated southern states.
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The Sociogony

Social Facts and the Ontology of Objects, Things, and Monsters

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Mark P. Worrell

The Sociogony re-examines the social ontology of what Durkheim calls ‘social facts’ in the light of critical and progressive hostilities to the facticity of facts and the necessity of moral absolutes in the shift from bourgeois liberalism to a neoliberalism global order. The introduction offers a wide-ranging rumination on the concept of the absolute after its apparent downfall; the chapter on facts turns the problem of external authority on its head and the chapter dealing with the sociogony situates facts in a process of generation, rule, and decay. Drawing heavily on the works of Hegel, Marx, Weber, and Durkheim, the resulting synthesis is what the author refers to as a Marxheimian Social Theory that offers a new map and a stable ontology for the homeless mind.
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Social Welfare Responses in a Neoliberal Era

Policies, Practices and Social Problems

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This book seeks to explore welfare responses by questioning and going beyond the assumptions found in Esping-Andersen’s (1990) broad typologies of welfare capitalism. Specifically, the project seeks to reflect how the state engages, and creates general institutionalized responses to, market mechanisms and how such responses have created path dependencies in how states approach problems of inequality. Moreover, if the neoliberal era is defined as the dissemination and extension of market values to all forms of state institutions and social action, the need arises to critically investigate not only the embeddedness of such values and modes of thought in different contexts and institutional forms, but responses and modes of resistance arising from practice that might point to new forms of resilience.

Contributors: Maria Appel Nissen, Mia Arp Fallov, Vibeke Bak Nielsen, Cory Blad, Rossella Ciccia, Lukasz Czarnecki, Ricardo A. Dello Buono, César Guzmán-Concha, Jayne Malenfant, Naomi Nichols, Frank Ridzi, Pia Ringø, Delfino Vargas Chanes.
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The 38th World Congress of ISS addressed some of the most fundamental issues of sociological inquiry in light of global processes and the development of different fields of knowledge: What does it mean to be human? What is the nature of social as opposed to natural processes? How do efforts to map the social and political world interact with that world and with traditional sociological practices? What can we say about relationships between scientific, political and religious beliefs? This volume sets the stage for a sustained look at what social science can say about the twenty-first century and to address the theme of the congress in 2008: Sociology Looks at the 21th Century. From Local Universalism to Global Contextualism.

Contributors are: Gustaf Arrhenius, Rajeev Bhargava, Craig Calhoun, Shmuel N. Eisentstadt, Yehuda Elkana, Raghavendra Gadagkar, Peter Hedström, Hans Joas, Hannes Klöpper, Ivan Krastev, Steven Lukes, Vinh-Kim Nguyen, Helga Nowotny, Shalini Randeria, Alan Ryan, Jyotirmaya Sharma, Christina Torén, Michel Wieviorka, Björn Wittrock, Petri Ylikoski.
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Revolution and Its Alternatives

Other Marxisms, Other Empowerments, Other Priorities     

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Tom Brass

Against the usual argument heard most frequently on the left, that there is no subject for a radical politics together with its form of political mobilization, there is – but in the absence of a radical leftist project, this subject has in the past, and in many instances is still, transferring his/her support to the radical politics on offer from the other end of the ideological spectrum. The combination of on the one hand a globally expanding industrial reserve army, generating ever more intense competition in the labour markets of capitalism, and on the other the endorsement by many on the left not of class but rather of non-class identities espoused by the ‘new’ populist postmodernism, has fuelled what can only be described as a perfect storm, politically speaking.
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James White

In this first full-length biography of Alexander Bogdanov, James D. White traces the intellectual development of this key socialist thinker, situating his ideas in the context of the Russian revolutionary movement. He examines the part Bogdanov played in the origins of Bolshevism, his role in the revolutions of 1905 and 1917 and his conflict with Lenin, which lasted into Soviet times. The book examines in some detail Bogdanov’s intellectual legacy, which, though deliberately obscured and distorted by his adversaries, was considerable and is of lasting significance. Bogdanov was an original and influential interpreter of Marx. He had a mastery of many spheres of knowledge, this expertise being employed in writing his chief theoretical work Tectology, which anticipates modern systems theory.
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Martha E. Giménez

In Marx, Women and Capitalist Social Reproduction, Martha E. Gimenez offers a distinctive perspective on social reproduction which posits that the relations of production determine the relations of social reproduction, and links the effects of class exploitation and location to forms of oppression predominantly theorized in terms of identity. Grounding her analysis on Marx’s theory and methodology, Gimenez examines the relationship between class, reproduction and the oppression of women in different contexts such as the reproduction of labor power, domestic labor, feminization of poverty, and reproductive technologies. Because most women and men, whether members of dominant or oppressed groups, are working class, she argues that the future of feminist politics is inextricably tied to class politics and the fate of capitalism.
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Marx on Capitalism

The Interaction-Recognition-Antinomy Thesis

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James Furner

In Marx on Capitalism, James Furner offers a new answer to the fundamental question of Marxism: can a philosophical thesis connecting capital, the state and classes with the desirability of socialism be developed from an analysis of the commodity? The Interaction-Recognition-Antinomy Thesis is anchored in a systematic retranslation of Marx’s writings, and critical engagement with a wide range of Anglophone and German language scholarship. It offers an antinomy-based strategy for grounding the value of social humanity in working-class agency, facilitates a dialectical derivation of the logic of political representation, and condemns capitalism as unjust without appeal to rights.
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Journalism as a ‘Peacekeeping agent’ at the Time of Conflict’ offers various perspectives to the question ‘Could journalism play a role as a peacekeeping agent in many contexts of conflict?’ with the contribution of academics from different countries. The book deals with media’s current issues through different aspects by presenting comparative studies on peace journalism such as investigative journalism, media freedom, feminist news criticism, alternative media, peace photography, fear culture. Also, in many chapters it provides a roadmap for implementing peace journalism to resolve conflict-oriented problems.

Contributors: Annabel McGoldrick, Aradhana Sharma, Ece Algan, Jake Lynch, Maria Ahmad, Marianne Perez de Fransius, Meah Mostafiz, Rukhsana Aslam, Samuel Peleg, Sevda Alankuş, Shabbir Hussain, Steven Youngblood, Tirşe Erbaysal Filibeli, Yasemin Giritli İnceoğlu.