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The Lives of Modern Japanese Silk Mill Workers in Their Own Words
Author: Sandra Schaal
At a time when concern with the exploitation of young women in the assembly plants of developing countries is still a major social issue for gender and development specialists, Discovering Women's Voices. The Lives of Modern Japanese Silk Mill Workers in Their Own Words, offers a vivid account of the lives of women who formed modern Japan’s ‘reserve army’ for textile mills.

By analyzing works songs and oral testimonies of former silk-reeling operatives about their lives in the factory and in their native countryside, it challenges the long-standing assumption describing their history as merely exploitative, convincingly showing that factory life could appear as a window of opportunity or at least a lesser evil to workers born in rural underprivileged families.
The Asian Social Science Series was initiated by the editorial team of the Southeast Asian Journal of Social Science at the Department of Sociology, National University of Singapore. Published under the joint imprints of the Times Academic Press, Singapore and Brill, Leiden, the Series publishes original material and revised editions of special issues of the Asian Journal of Social Science. The Series welcomes submissions from sociologists, anthropologists, political scientists, economists, geographers, historians and cultural studies specialists working on any aspect of Asia. Its inter-disciplinary orientation serves to encompass a broad range of theoretical and substantive interests.

Forthcoming titles in the Asian Social Science Series include the following:

Critical Perspectives on Cities in Southeast Asia
Reconceptualising Southeast Asia
Reconceptualising Ethnicity in Singapore and Malaysia
Science, Technology and Society in the Asia-Pacific Region
Cartooning and Comic Art in Southeast Asia
Diaspora of Identity: The Sociology of Culture in Southeast Asia.
The Karen in Thailand and Burma
Eurasians in Singapore
The China Educational Development Yearbooks have been restructured and renamed as Chinese Research Perspectives on Education since 2012.

China’s education system has grown increasingly complex, creating the need for an annual critical review of the education system by China’s top scholars. The Blue Book of Education (教育蓝皮书), as it is known in Chinese, has gained a reputation for offering the most penetrating perspective in China about educational reform and development. The China Educational Development Yearbook is an important English translation of this critical annual report where developments, challenges, and crises in Chinese education are comprehensively discussed and critically analyzed. This series is essential reading for anyone who wants to understand the perspective of some of China’s most critical scholars about the most pressing challenges facing educational development in China.
Editorial Board / Council Member: Fang Cai, Kam Wing Chan, and William Lavely
The China Population and Labor Yearbooks have been restructured and renamed as Chinese Research Perspectives on Population and Labor since 2012.

This yearbook, the English version of the Chinese Green Book of Population and Labor (人口与劳动绿皮书), examines current developments in the Chinese demographic transition and its implications, especially for the labor market. Each annual report is a collection of articles written by demographers and economists from the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences (CASS) and other leading research institutes, policy think tanks, and universities in China. Several of the articles analyze the results of in-depth and population surveys conducted in recent years, and many of the findings of this research has influenced and continues to influence major government policy decisions made by the Chinese government.

The series published one volume over the last 5 years.
Twelve Lectures on Social Contradictions in China
Author: Zhongmin WU
Translator: Jun HE
There are twelve lectures in this book. The theoretical section addresses the concept of social contradictions, their various forms and influencing factors, their dual functions and how they aid social development. The author then compares the characteristics of contradictions in traditional and modern society, and analyzes how their special laws have become applicable during periods of transition in contemporary Chinese society. He interprets the contradictions between the public and officials, the rich and the poor, and labor and capital. He also looks at social contradictions in the internet era. He finally analyzes the possibility of social unrest in China and proposes how to actively and effectively deal with social contradictions. His study of social contradictions is of theoretical and practical significance.
Volume Editors: Fenggang Yang, Jonathan Pettit, and Chris White
This volume is a collection of studies of various religious groups in the changing religious markets of China: registered Christian congregations, unregistered house churches, Daoist masters, and folk-religious temples. The contributing authors are emerging Chinese scholars who apply and respond to Fenggang Yang’s tricolor market theory of religion in China: the red, black, and gray markets for legal, illegal, and ambiguous religious groups, respectively. These ethnographic studies demonstrate a great variety within the gray market, and fluidity across different markets. The volume concludes with Fenggang Yang reviewing the introduction of the religious market theories to China and formally responding to major criticisms of these theories.
In China, strong economic growth over the past four decades, accelerated urbanisation and multiple inequalities between urban and rural worlds have driven the escalation of internal and international migrations. The internal migration of workers represents a unique phenomenon since the reform and opening of China. Less-qualified young migrants are living in subaltern conditions and young migrant graduates have strongly internalised the idea of being the "heroes" of the new Chinese society in a context of emotional capitalism. But internal and international migrations intersect and intertwine, young internal and international migrants from China produce economic cosmopolitanisms in Chinese society and through top-down, bottom-up and intermediary globalisation. The young Chinese migrant incarnates the Global Individual, what we labeled here as the Compressed Individual.
In Assessing the Landscape of Taiwan and Korean Studies in Comparison, the chapters offer a reflection on the state of the field of Taiwan and Korea Studies. For the editors, the volume’s purpose was to identify not just their similarities, but also a reflection on their differences. Both have national identities formed in a colonial period. The surrender of Japan in 1945 ignited the light of independence for Korea, but this would be ideologically split within five years. For Taiwan, that end forced it into a born-again form of nationalism with the arrival of the Chinese Nationalists.

Taiwan and South Korea’s economic development illustrate a progressive transition and key to understanding this is the relationship between ‘modernization’ and ‘democracy’. By looking at Korea and Taiwan, the chapters in the volume broaden an understanding of the interconnectivity of the region.
The collapse of the Soviet Union brought about the sudden expansion of the ‘developing world’, as the populations of many of the former Soviet republics were abruptly plunged into poverty and international development agencies rushed to their aid. In this account of development intervention since 1991 in Kyrgyzstan, one of these republics, Joanna Pares Hoare draws on feminist critiques to chart how concepts of gender equality, civil society, and activism came to be instrumentalised in development interventions in the post-Soviet space. Ethnographic data gathered through interviews and observation with employees and volunteers in local NGOs provides further insight into what this has meant for activists in Kyrgyzstan who are striving for progressive social change.
Japan’s Private Spheres: Autonomy in Japanese History, 1600-1930 traces the shifting nature of autonomy in early modern and modern Japan. In this far-reaching, interdisciplinary study, W. Puck Brecher explores the historical development of the private and its evolving relationship with public authority, a dynamic that evokes stereotypes about an alleged dearth of individual agency in Japanese society. It does so through a montage of case studies. For the early modern era, case studies examine peripheral living spaces, boyhood, and self-interrogation in the arts. For the modern period, they explore strategic deviance, individuality in Meiji education, modern leisure, and body-maintenance. Analysis of these disparate private realms illuminates evolving conceptualizations of the private and its reciprocal yet often-contested relationship to the state.