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Perspectives on Happiness

Concepts, Conditions and Consequences

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Edited by Søren Harnow Klausen, Bryon Martin, Mustafa Cihan Camci and Sarah Bushey

Happiness is a challenging, multifaceted topic, which obviously calls for an interdisciplinary approach. This work is a collection of papers which explore the phenomenon of happiness from a variety of angles, and from both theoretical and practical perspectives. They deal with the general nature and conditions of happiness, methods and measures for studying happiness, the consequences of happiness policies and discourses and the significance of specific factors, like landscapes or educational environments, for happiness. Some of the papers investigate the thoughts of ancient, 19th-century or 20th-century philosophers. Others employ theories and techniques from contemporary psychology to get a firmer grip on the elusive phenomenon of happiness. Contributors include Ranjeeta Basu, Valeriu Budeanu, Sarah Bushey, Mustafa Cihan Camci, Emily Corrigan-Kavanagh, Carolina Escobar-Tello, Julia Hotz, Søren Harnow Klausen, Kathy Pui Ying Lo, Andrea-Mariana Marian, Bryon Martin, Andrew Molas, Sean Moran, Liza Ortiz, Shelomi Panditharatne, Sheila M. Rucki, Jane Russel-O’Connor and Marie Thomas.
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Edited by Peter Bray

This book is a scholarly collection of interdisciplinary perspectives and practices that examine the positive potential of attending to the voices and stories of those who live and work with illness in real world settings. Its international contributors offer case studies and research projects illustrating how illness can disrupt, highlight and transform themes in personal narratives, forcing the creation of new biographies. As exercises in narrative development and autonomy, the evolving content and expression of illness stories are crucial to our understanding of the lived experience of those confronting life changes. The international contributors to this volume demonstrate the importance of hearing, understanding and effectively liberating voices impacted by illness and change. Contributors include Tineke Abma, Peter Bray, Verusca Calabria, Agnes Elling, Deborah Freedman, Alexandra Fidyk, Justyna Jajszczok, Naomi Krüger, Annie McGregor, Pam Morrison, Miranda Quinney, Yomna Saber, Elena Sharratt, Victorria Simpson-Gervin, Hans T. Sternudd, Mirjam Stuij, Anja Tramper, Alison Ward and Jane Youell.
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Alfredo Saad Filho

Value and Crisis brings together selected essays written by Alfredo Saad-Filho, one of the most prominent Marxist political economists today. This book examines the labour theory of value from a rich and innovative perspective, from which fresh insights and new perspectives are derived, with applications for the nature of neoliberalism, financialisation, inflation, monetary policy, and the contradictions, limitations and crises of contemporary capitalism.
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Art Therapy in Australia

Taking a Postcolonial, Aesthetic Turn

Edited by Andrea J. Gilroy, Sheridan Linnell, Tarquam McKenna and Jill Westwood

Art Therapy in Australia: Taking a Postcolonial, Aesthetic Turn explores and enacts established and emergent art therapy histories, narratives and practices in the specific postcolonial context of contemporary Australia. It is the first published book to attempt to map this terrain. In doing so, the book aims to document important aspects of art therapy in Australia, including how Australian approaches both reiterate and challenge the dominant discourse of art therapy. This book is as much a performance as an account of the potential of art therapy to honour alterity, illuminate possibilities and bear witness to the intrapsychic, relational and social realms. The book offers a selective window into the rambling assemblage that is art therapy in the ‘Great Southern Land’.

Contributors are: Jan Allen, Bronwyn Davies, Claire Edwards, Nicolette Eisdell, Patricia Fenner, John Henzell, Pam Johnston, Lynn Kapitan, Carmen Lawson, Sheridan Linnell, Tarquam McKenna, Michelle Moss, Suzanne Perry, Josephine Pretorius, Jean Rumbold, Victoria Schnaedelbach, Lilian Tan, Jody Thomson, Jill Westwood, Amanda Woodford, and Davina Woods.
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Anne-Kristin Römpke

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The growing body of research on human-animal bonds highlights the need of common methods and research designs to facilitate comparisons. A well-evaluated and widely used instrument for measuring subjective attitude towards house pets (companion animals) is the Pet Attitude Scale (PAS). The objective of the present study was to develop and validate a cross-cultural version of the PAS for use in German-speaking countries. The scale was translated and back-translated, pre-tested, and tested for reliability and factor structure. Results indicated the German adaptation showed reliability measures comparable to the original version. The factor structure resembled the results of a reevaluation of the PAS. Prediction of companion animal ownership showed good results. The German adaptation of the PAS appears to be reliable and valid for the assessment of the attitude towards companion animals in German-speaking countries.

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Karyn Pilgrim

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This paper examines Pollan’s The Omnivore’s Dilemma (2006) and Kingsolver’s Animal, Vegetable, Miracle (2007), and argues that pastoral and narrative elements of these texts obscure an uncomfortable dissonance between their locavore claims to environmental sustainability and “sustainable meat” production. Much recent literature from within the frameworks of ecocriticism and ethics has been critical of the ethical/ sustainable meat movement for using simplistic and inaccurate models of sustainability, and for failing to reposition nonhuman animals outside the framework of capitalist commodification. Inadequately considered by these self-fulfilling stories are empirical data that indicate a global lack of resources to deploy “sustainable meat” production, as well as the implications of continuing the ideology of dominion over nonhumans. This paper calls for a new sustainable food story that encourages radical ways of thinking about farming and nonhumans, and that incorporates a landscape both urban and rural.

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Corey Lee Wrenn

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Capturing Cruelty

A Content Analysis of Companion Animal Cruelty in the News Media

Shannon T. Grugan

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The news media has long been identified as one of the primary sources for factual crime information for the general public, but not much is known about media coverage of cruelty against nonhuman animals, specifically. This study is a content analysis of media-presented themes in 240 print news articles that reported incidents of cruelty against companion animals in the United States in 2013. Seven thematic presentations of cruelty are identified and include: neutrality, condemnation, sympathy for the animal, drama, advocacy, humor, and sympathy for the offender. These themes are not mutually exclusive, with many articles including aspects of more than one theme. Themes are discussed in detail in regard to expanding the understanding of how specific forms of crime are presented by the news media based in news-making criminology.

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Eva Voslarova, Jiri Zak, Vladimir Vecerek and Iveta Bedanova

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Coat color influenced the likelihood of a dog being reclaimed from a shelter as well as the length of stay (LOS) of abandoned dogs at the shelter. The shortest LOS was found in brindle and multicolor dogs (median time until adoption: 17 and 18 days, respectively) followed by white, fawn, red, brown, black and tan, and grey dogs. Black dogs had the greatest LOS (median 32 days). In lost dogs, coat color had no significant effect on the time spent at a shelter, the median time until a dog was reclaimed by his/her caretaker being one day, irrespective of the coat color. However, the results of our study suggest that black, brown, and brindle dogs are more likely to be abandoned by their caretakers, and that fawn, black and tan, grey, and red dogs, if lost, have a better chance of being reclaimed by their caretakers.