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Transversal Solidarities and Politics of Possibility
Contending Global Apartheid: Transversal Solidarities and Politics of Possibility spells out a plea for utopia in a crisis-ridden 21st century of unequal development, exclusionary citizenship, and forced migrations. The volume offers a collection of critical essays on human rights movements, sanctuary spaces, and the emplacement of antiracist conviviality in cities across North and South America, Europe, and Africa. They proceed from the idea that cities may accommodate both a humanistic sensibility and a radical potential for social transformation. The figure of the ‘migrant’ is pivotal. It expounds the prospect of transversal solidarity to capture a plurality of commonalities and to abjure dichotomies between in-group and out-group, the national and the international, or society and institutions.

Contributors are: Aleksandra Ålund, Ilker Ataç, Martin Bak Jørgensen, Harald Bauder, Iriann Freemantle, Christophe Foultier, Óscar García Agustín, Shannon Gleeson, Margaret Godoy, Els de Graauw, Ilhan Kellecioglu, Loren B. Landau, Jorge Morales Cardiel, Janet Munakamwe, Kim Rygiel, Ana Santamarina, Carl-Ulrik Schierup, Sarah Schilliger, and Maurice Stierl.
The Structural Inequities of Capitalism, from Lehman Brothers to Covid-19
In Crisis, Inequalities and Poverty, Schettino and Clementi provide an empirical and theoretical analysis of the economic breakdown that has characterised the last two decades of capitalist development – from the Lehman collapse to the Covid-19 pandemic – with a particular focus on the impact on poverty and inequality. The book provides a materialist account of the current global crisis of overproduction and looks at the link between capitalist crisis and systemic inequity, making the case through detailed quantification that the principal engine of these structural phenomena is in fact the general law of accumulation of the capitalist mode of production.
Volume Editors: Giovanni Paoletti and Massimo Pendenza
Sociology for Durkheim was by no means a knowledge closed in its specificity. It was rather an open science, permeable to contributions coming from other disciplines. For him, the task of sociology was to study what held societies together, giving place to reflective change and progressive development. This is an epistemological and political model that still retains all its relevance today: an example to be rediscovered against any reductionist conception of the vocation and object of social sciences; an encouragement to see sociology as an indispensable protagonist for an authentic interdisciplinary dialogue in the field of humanities. It is one of the best legacies Durkheim left us, that this book attempts to illustrate.
The Functioning of Capitalism in History
Despite their many disagreements when it comes to the subject of capitalism, Marxist and market-liberal approaches seem to agree about one thing: the economic structures of capitalist market society have made direct violence against the person not only superfluous, but economically counterproductive. Heide Gerstenberger's Market and Violence does not contest the thesis that there has been, in many places, a decline in the use of violence in the pursuit of profit; but it demolishes the assumption that this can be put down to the evolution of economic rationality. By means of a deep engagement with the concrete historical reality of capitalist economies, Gerstenberger establishes that, wherever capitalism has been tamed, this has been achieved only by a combination of energetic social contestation and political intervention. First published in German in 2018, the present English-language edition makes a sweeping history of capitalist violence by one of the preeminent theorists of capitalist society working today available to a wider readership.
Volume Editors: Raju J. Das and Deepak K. Mishra
Much ink has been spilled on poverty measurements and trends, at the expense of revealing causality. Assembling multi-disciplinary and international contributions, this book shows that a causal understanding of poverty in rich and poor countries is essential. That understanding must be based on a critical interrogation of the wider social relations which set up the mechanisms producing poverty as an outcome. Processes that widen/strengthen crisis-ridden market relations, that increase income/wealth inequality, and that ‘enhance’ the policy-biases of nation-states and international institutions toward the affluent-propertied strata cause global poverty and undermine poor people’s political power. The processes concentrating wealth-creation are poverty-causing processes. Through theoretical and empirical analyses this volume offers important insights and political prescriptions to address global poverty.

Contributors are:Raju J. Das, Deepak K. Mishra, Steven Pressman, Michael Roberts, Jamie Gough, Aram Eisenschitz, Anjan Chakravarty, Mizhar Mikati, Marcelo Milan, Tarique Niazi, John Marangos, Eirini Triarchi, Themis Anthrakidis, Macayla Kisten and Brij Maharaj, David Michael M. San Juan, and Thaddeus Hwong.
The 14th thematic volume of International Development Policy provides perspectives through case studies from the global Souths focusing on the challenges and opportunities of governing migration on the subnational, national, regional and international levels. Bringing together some thirty authors from Africa, Latin America and Asia, the book explores existing and new policies and frameworks in terms of their successes and best practices, and looks at them through the lens of additional challenges, such as those brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic, the rise of nationalisms and an increase in xenophobia. The chapters also take the ‘5 Ps’ approach to sustainable development (people, planet, prosperity, peace and partnerships) and assess how migration policies serve sustainable development in a rapidly evolving context.

Contributors are Yousra Abourabi, Gabriela Agosto, Belkis Aracena, Andrea Fernández Benítez, Macarena Chepo, Amanda Coffie, Jonathan Crush, María del Consuelo Dávila Pérez, Dêlidji Eric Degila, Jenny Lind Elmaco, René Leyva Flores, Luisa Feline Freier, Silvia Núñez García, Marcela Pezoa González, Binod Khadria, Ariel González Levaggi, Wei Li, Meixin Liu, Ling Ma, Ratnam Mishra, Daniel Naujoks, Claudia Padilla, Karol Rojas, Fabiana Rubinstein, Yining Tan, Narender Thakur, Gerasimos Tsourapas, Valeria Marina Valle and Jossette Iribarne Wiff.
What explains neo-nationalism – the surge of populist nationalism in the contemporary phase of globalized development? Drawing on Karl Polanyi’s study of the “great transformation,” Oleksandr Svitych argues that neo-nationalism is a societal protective reaction against the pro-market structural changes in the political economies of nation-states – conceptualized as the capital-state transformation. He shows that there is an inextricable link between free market reforms, declining state legitimacy, and identity-based mobilization. To test the book’s argument, Svitych adopts a mixed methods approach of quantitative statistical analysis and qualitative case studies. First, he examines the relationship between the capital-state and neo-nationalism by using a time-series cross-sectional analysis of thirty-five member-states of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. Estimates suggest that the capital-state – measured through the composite capital-state index – is a significant and powerful predictor of the neo-nationalist vote. Second, through four case studies (Australia, France, Hungary, and South Korea) the mechanisms that link macro-economic transformations to neo-nationalist vote or lack thereof are explored. Svitych finds that discontented voters gravitate toward these political forces and embrace identity-based solutions – often in exclusivist and scapegoating forms – to harness their anxieties and insecurities triggered by the capital-state restructuring. Both methods demonstrate that populist nationalism of both the Left and the Right has emerged to compensate for the real and perceived inability of the state to shield citizens from the corrosive effects of market fundamentalism. The book contributes to our understanding of the dynamics of the inter-related nature of state, capital, and identity politicization through a broader social theoretical perspective.