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Youth, Religion, and Identity in a Globalizing Context: International Perspectives investigates the ways that young people navigate the intersections of religion and identity. As part of the Youth in a Globalizing World series, this book provides a broad discussion on the various social, cultural, and political forces affecting youth and their identities from an international comparative perspective. Contributors to this volume situate the experiences of young people in Canada, the United States, Germany, and Australia within a globalized context. This volume explores the different experiences of youth, the impact of community and processes of recognition, and the reality of ambivalence as agency.
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Young People and the Politics of Outrage and Hope brings together contributions from international youth studies experts who ask how young people and institutions are responding to high levels of unemployment, student debt, housing costs that lock many out of home ownership, and the challenge to find meaningful modes of participation in neo-liberal social contexts. Contributors including Henry Giroux, Anita Harris and Judith Bessant, draw on a range of theoretical, methodological and empirical work to identify and debate some of the challenges and opportunities of the politics of outrage and hope that should accompany academic, community and political discussions about the futures that young people will inherit and make.
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Vincenzo Cicchelli

We live in a globalized world in which a person in Burkina Faso can identify with Star Wars heroes, and in which a New York trader drinks the same Starbucks coffee as his Taiwanese counterpart. How are individuals are socialized in Rome, Bombay, and Tokyo? To answer these questions, a unique investigation has been carried out using two scales of analysis usually tackled separately by global studies: the scale of the cosmopolitan world and its global narratives, imaginaries, iconographies; as well as the scale of everyday life and socialization to otherness. This two-fold perspective constitutes the innovative approach of this volume that endeavors to address an operationalization of the cosmopolitan perspective and reacts to current debates and new research findings.

This book was first published in 2016 as Pluriel et commun. Sociologie d'un monde cosmopolite by Les Presses de Sciences Po, Paris.
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Pathways to Belonging

Contemporary Perspectives of School Belonging

School belonging should be a priority across every facet of education. The research on school belonging for positive student outcomes has been widely accepted and findings demonstrating its role as a protective factor against mental ill health and youth suicide are too compelling to ignore. In an age where it has been argued that academic achievement is prioritised over wellbeing, the editors bring the importance of school belonging back to the fore in educational policy and planning. This book is the most comprehensive compendium of its kind on the topic of school belonging. An engaging foreword by Professor John Hattie of The University of Melbourne sets the scene for an engaging and somewhat challenging look at how school belonging is quintessential in contemporary schooling.

Contributors are: Kelly Allen, Christopher Boyle, Jonathan Cohen, Crystal Coker, Erin Dowdy, Clemence Due, Jonathan K. Ferguson, Sebastian Franke, Michael Furlong, Annie Gowing, Alun Jackson, Divya Jindal-Snape, Andrew Martinez, Daniel Mays, Susan Dvorak McMahon, Vicki McKenzie, Franka Metzner, Kathryn Moffa, Silke Pawils, Damien W. Riggs, Sue Roffey, Lisa Schneider, Bini Sebastian, Christopher D. Slaten, Jessica Smead, Amrit Thapa, Dianne Vella-Brodrick, Lea Waters, Michelle Wichmann, and Holger Zielemanns.
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This set of essays critically analyze global citizenship by bringing together leading ideas about citizenship and the commons in this time that both needs and resists a global perspective on issues and relations. Education plays a significant role in how we come to address these issues and this volume will contribute to ensuring that equity, global citizenship, and the common wealth provide platforms from which we might engage in transformational, collective work. The authors address the global significance of debates and struggles about belonging and abjection, solidarity and rejection, identification and othering, as well as love and hate.

Global citizenship, as a concept and a practice, is now being met with a dangerous call for insularism and a protracted ethno-nationalism based on global economic imperialism, movements for white supremacy and miscegenation, various forms of religious extremism, and identity politics, but which antithetically, also comes from the anti-globalization movement focused on building strong, sustainable communities. We see a taming of citizens that contributes to the taming of what we understand as the public sphere and the commons, the places of cultural, natural, and intellectual resources that are shared and not privately owned. The work of global citizenship education is distinguishable from the processes of a deadly globalization or destruction of the world that responds to the interlocking issues that make life on the planet precarious for human and non-humans everywhere (albeit an unequal precarity).

This book is an invitation into a conversation that explores and makes visible some of the hidden chasms of oppression and inequity in the world. It is meant to provoke both argument and activism as we work to secure common spaces that are broadly life-sustaining.

Contributors are: Ali A. Abdi, Sung Kyung Ahn, Chouaib El Bouhali, Xochilt Hernández, Carrie Karsgaard, Marlene McKay, Michael O’Sullivan, Christina Palech, Karen Pashby, Karen J. Pheasant-Neganigwane, Thashika Pillay, Ashley Rerrie, Grace J. Rwiza, Toni Samek, Lynette Shultz, Harry Smaller, Crain Soudien, Derek Tannis, and Irene Friesen Wolfstone.
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Wide-awakeness in the World

Exploring Pedagogical Dimensions of Youth Ministry in Conversation with Maxine Greene

Helen Blier and Graham Stanton

Maxine Greene’s aesthetic pedagogy speaks to the sense of purposelessness felt by many young people today. Greene’s pedagogy cultivates the moral life defined as a sense of ‘wide-awakeness in the world’ through promoting the work of the imagination through engagement with the creative arts. Imagination creates community by being a precondition of empathy. Greene’s philosophy calls religious educators to create dialogic spaces of mutual concern. Theological engagement with Greene asks how the quest for meaning making is not simply a pedagogical version of sin. Charles Taylor’s analysis of authenticity identifies the ethical core in the pursuit of meaning-making. Greene’s challenge to Christian theology to give young people freedom in their spiritual choices is answered with David Bentley Hart’s notion of Christian persuasion as ‘the martyr’s gift’. Youth ministries pursue the kingdom vision of shalom in hope grounded in the resurrection of Christ.

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Pivoting toward Hope

Interplay of Imagination, Fear and Life Experience

Francisca Ireland-Verwoerd and Mary Elizabeth Moore

This paper explores transformative moments in the lives of young people, drawing from interviews and focus groups with 75 youth. We highlight the emerging theme of hope with portraitures drawn from two young women’s narratives as we give particular attention to the role of imagination, fear, and life experiences in their stories. Then we analyse more generally the interviewees’ narrations of hope and the influences that evoke, support, and/or discourage their hopes. In conclusion, we create a dialogue between the young voices and the theological literature to discover how they challenge and enlarge one another. The paper closes with proposals for educational practice.

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Meeting Metalheads

Encountering the Stranger as a Hermeneutical and Spiritual Exercise

André Mulder

This article explores the world view, social position and psychological make-up of people who listen to metal music (metalheads) and the cultural reactions to this genre in order to prepare for an encounter with metalheads in religious education and youth ministry. Only when teachers and youth ministers can connect with the world view of young people can they fulfil their hermeneutical-didactical task of fostering religious identity. Using the spiritual model of Waaijman, the concept of ‘meeting a stranger’ is introduced as a spiritual exercise for teachers to open themselves to the questions of life these students are meditating. Religious motives regarding hospitality to strangers stimulate an open attitude for a fruitful dialogue. A short theory of pain, based on content analysis of 81 songs, demonstrates not only the serious character of the lyrics of metal music but also their role in sustaining metalheads in their struggles.

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Timothy Nagy

This article presents a reflection on a Catholic retreat for young adults, focusing on participation in faith sharing. After describing the retreat, the author incorporates the thought of Victor Turner, primarily his concept of communitas, to explain why a retreat can be a setting which prompts the sharing of such deep testimonies of faith. The cultural forms of symbols, rituals, sacred space, silence, and solitude converge to form a communitas conducive to faith sharing. To conclude, the author offers that using this lens of liminality can help to shape retreats for young adults across the ecumenical spectrum.