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Edited by Helen Yitah and Helen Lauer

Philosophical Foundations of the African Humanities Through Postcolonial Perspectives critiques recent claims that the humanities, especially in public universities in poor countries, have lost their significance, defining missions, methods and standards due to the pressure to justify their existence. The predominant responses to these claims have been that the humanities are relevant for creating a “world culture” to address the world’s problems. This book argues that behind such arguments lies a false neutrality constructed to deny the values intrinsic to marginalized cultures and peoples and to justify their perceived inferiority. These essays by scholars in postcolonial studies critique these false claims about the humanities through critical analyses of alterity, difference, and how the Other is perceived, defined and subdued. Contributors: Gordon S.K. Adika, Kofi N. Awoonor, E. John Collins, Kari Dako, Mary Esther Kropp Dakubu, James Gibbs, Helen Lauer, Bernth Lindfors, J.H. Kwabena Nketia, Abena Oduro, Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, Olúfémi Táíwò, Alexis B. Tengan, Kwasi Wiredu, Francis Nii-Yartey
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Edited by Abdulqawi A. Yusuf

Founded in 1993, the African Yearbook, now published under the auspices of the African Foundation for International Law, is the only scholarly publication devoted exclusively to the study, development, dissemination and wider appreciation of international law in Africa as a whole.

Through the study and analysis of emerging legal issues of particular relevance to Africa, such as the creation of viable continental institutions capable of promoting unity and security for the peoples of the continent, the effective protection of human rights, the need for accountability for mass killings and massive violations of the rule of law, the promotion of a rule-based democratic culture, the role of African countries in a globalizing world economy and in international trade relations, the Yearbook strives to be responsive to the intellectual needs of African countries in the area of international law, and to the continuing struggle for creating an environment conducive to the rule of law throughout the continent
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Edited by Sebastian Günther and Dorothee Pielow

Die Geheimnisse der oberen und der unteren Welt ( The Secrets of the Upper and the Lower World) is a substantial new collection of essays on magic in Islamic cultural history. Both comprehensive and innovative in its approach, this book offers fresh insights into an important yet still understudied area of Islamic intellectual history. The seventeen chapters deal with key aspects of Islamic magic, including its historical developments, geographical variants, and modern-day practices. The general introduction identifies and problematizes numerous sub-topics and key practitioners/theoreticians in the Arabo-Islamic context. This, along with terminological and bibliographical appendices, makes the volume an unparalleled reference work for both specialists and a broader readership. Contributors: Ursula Bsees, Johann Christoph Bürgel, Susanne Enderwitz, Hans Daiber; Sebastian Günther, Mahmoud Haggag, Maher Jarrar, Anke Joisten-Pruschke, Fabian Käs, Ulrich Marzolph, Christian Mauder, Tobias Nünlist, Khanna Omarkhali, Eva Orthmann, Bernd-Christian Otto, Dorothee Pielow, Lutz Richter-Bernburg, Johanna Schott & Johannes Thomann.
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Yun Liu

Abstract

This paper reviews the historical evolution of China’s education-aid programs. These specific programs are seemingly consistent with China’s education reform legacy. With a cross-disciplinary survey regarding how foreign-aid policy commitments got delivered, the paper proposes more inclusive approaches for interpreting local contexts relevant to China’s education-aid policies. The following discussion first presents local evidence to provide plausible explanations from the national background of China’s social-economic reforms since the 1970s. Then it gives a case study of Wuhan, the provincial capital of Hubei, to examine how the local higher-education institutions have managed those education-aid practices since the late 1990s. Re-visiting a variety of mainstream views on China’s evolving national identity as a member of the Global South, the article ends by making some analysis of significance to the evolution of China’s education-aid policies.

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Ben K. Agyei-Mensah

Abstract

This study investigated the influence of corporate governance on the disclosure of forward looking information by firms listed on the Ghana Stock Exchange. The forward-looking information used in this study were obtained from statements made for management in either the Managing Director or Board Chairman’s reports regarding future operating outcomes.

The results of the extent of disclosure of forward looking information, mean of 35%, indicate that most of the firms listed on the Ghana Stock Exchange did not disclose sufficient forward looking information in their annual reports. The low level (35%) of forward looking information disclosure will also make it very difficult for the firms’ stakeholders to determine future performance of the company. In a country where corruption, even within the judiciary, is high one way of hiding corrupt practices is to hide information from the users of the financial reports.

The results of the regression analysis indicate that board ownership concentration is the significant variable that explain the level of forward looking information disclosure.

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Oyebade Kunle Oyerinde

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Expatriates Go, Let Us Grow

An Analysis of Employment Patterns and Development of a Viable HRD Model of Saudi Arabia

Deepanjana Varshney

Abstract

The employment situation in Saudi Arabia and the dynamics of the labor market are the results of a series of decisions to grow the economy fast after the discovery of oil. Since the locals were not equipped and prepared with the required knowledge and expertise, to build up the nascent economy at rapid speed during that phase, there was a massive inflow of expatriates. The current research highlights the changing labor market in Saudi Arabia, unemployment among locals, remedial policies framed by the government, their drawbacks, and effect on the overall economy. The key antecedents are the preference of Saudi youth for the Public sector, unemployment, the role of the Education System, the private sector, the Nitaqat (job localization) system and expatriate factor. Finally, I propose a viable human capital development model that suggests a collaborative role for expatriates and employability enhancement programs for sustainable economic and social development.

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Nasima M. H. Carrim

Abstract

There is a dearth of research on how women managers engage in hybrid identity work during their career transitions, and the aim of this study was to fill this gap. Interviews were conducted with 13 Indian women managers in senior and top managerial positions, and the data obtained were analysed using thematic analysis. The narratives indicate that previously disadvantaged groups (Indian women in this case) are caught between subscribing to cultural values and concurrently conforming to organisational norms. Participants’ answers to the question: “Who am I as an Indian female manager?” reveal that during their career ascendency these women engage in a tremendous amount of hybrid identity work and rework related to their self-concept of being an “ideal” Indian female and simultaneously being a “perfect” manager. Nevertheless, in their career transitions to managerial positions, these women are selective in the hybrid identity work they engage in.