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Series:

This volume is dedicated to the memory of the eminent carcinologist Michael Türkay, of the Research Institute and Natural History Museum Senckenberg, Frankfurt am Main, Germany. It is a tribute to his outstanding international contribution to the study of decapod crustaceans. An extensive account of Michael’s life and achievements is presented, along with thirty-one scientific papers by 62 of his friends and colleagues from around the world. The book’s focus is almost entirely on decapod crustaceans, and covers a variety of topics, including taxonomy, systematics, zoogeography, morphology, palaeontology, genetics, general biology and ecology. Numerous new taxa are described from a number of marine and freshwater groups, including one new genus and 13 new species named in honour of Michael himself.

The contents of this volume were originally published in 2017 in Crustaceana volume 90, issue 7-10.
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Frederick Turner

Abstract

The speech of Time in Shakespeare’s The Winter’s Tale is here closely analyzed as the poet’s statement of his philosophy of time. The play’s breach of Aristotle’s unity of time—the play at this point lets pass sixteen years—introduces several other breaches of received wisdom about time. Shakespeare rejects the view of time the destroyer in his sonnets, replacing it with a view of time that combines time as judge, as that which tries or tests, as maker of lawfulness and laws, as gardener and agent of growth, and as emergent consciousness. An early feminist work, the play sees the creative function of time as characteristic of female ethics and action. Most radically, time is constitutively recursive in its nature, not a simple dimension, radically unpredictable yet retrodictable once an event has occurred. Nothing is lost, though the past itself grows in meaning as new time accumulates upon it.

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John Streamas

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Paul Harris

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Jo Alyson Parker

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José Garcia-Moreno

Abstract

In the last decade, we have noted increasing interest in animation from students diagnosed with autism. This article depicts the particular case of the Animation Department at Loyola Marymount University, where college students diagnosed with autistic syndrome disorder (asd) talk about patience, focus, and collaboration, and voice their opinions about their attraction to animation and how it has played an important role in their lives.