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This volume, the 36th year of published proceedings, contains five papers and four commentaries presented to the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy during the academic year 2019–20. Paper topics: On Platonism, how Plato’s Cave preserves his political interest from Arendt’s critique, and how Plutarch’s Isis and Osiris uses a complex framing device to integrate Platonic metaphysics and politics. On Aristotle, that dialectic is a versatile techne for formal and informal discussion, and the role of practice to preserve the voluntary nature of character despite its grounding in upbringing. Finally, using Aristotle to argue for the legitimacy of anger against transhumanist efforts, echoing Stoic concerns against such emotions. The comments challenge or sustain the theses presented in the main papers.
Author: Irene Binini
This book offers a major reassessment of Peter Abelard’s modal logic and theory of modalities, presenting them as far more uniform and consistent than was recognized until now. Irene Binini offers new ways of connecting Abelard’s modal views with other parts of his logic, semantics, metaphysics and theology.
Further, the work also provides a comprehensive study of the logical context in which Abelard’s theories originated and developed, by presenting fresh evidence about many 11th- and 12th-century sources that are still unpublished. This analysis sheds new light on the relations between Abelard and ancient authors such as Aristotle, Boethius, and Priscian, as well as between Abelard and his contemporaries, such as Anselm of Canterbury, William of Champeaux, Joscelin of Soissons, and Alberic of Paris.
Volume Editor: Peter Pormann
This collection of articles presents cutting-edge scholarship in Hippocratic studies in English from an international range of experts. It pays special attention to the commentary tradition, notably in Syriac and Arabic, and its relevance to the constitution and interpretation of works in the Hippocratic Corpus. It presents new evidence from hitherto unpublished sources, including Greek papyri and Syriac and Arabic manuscripts. It encompasses not only the classical period (and notably Galen), but also tackles evidence from the medieval and Renaissance periods.

Contributors are: Elizabeth Craik, David Leith, Tommaso Raiola, Jacques Jouanna, Caroline Magdelaine, Jean-Michel Mouton, Peter N. Singer, R. J. Hankinson, Ralph M. Rosen, Daniela Manetti, Mathias Witt, Amneris Roselli, Véronique Boudon-Millot, Sabrina Grimaudo, Giulia Ecca, Kamran I. Karimullah, María Teresa Santamaría Hernández, and Jesús Ángel y Espinós.
Philosophy as a Way of Life (PWL) is both a meta-philosophy and a methodological approach to the study of philosophy, inspired by the work of the French scholar Pierre Hadot (1922-2010). As a methodology, PWL emphasizes that all ancient philosophical works reflect pedagogical and psychagogic concerns, and argues that these features should continue to be taken into account in contemporary philosophy. It is based largely on the practice of “spiritual exercises”, intended to transform the practitioner’s way of perceiving the world, and hence her mode of being, in order to enable her to lead a freer, more happy existence. Thus, PWL views philosophy in its fullest sense as profoundly transformational.

Philosophy as a Way of Life: Texts and Studies will make available English translations of key studies on PWL and publish scholarly monographs and edited collections that consider its different aspects and implications.

Books in this series will explore PWL in antiquity, the renaissance, the early modern period, and up to the present, PWL as a methodological approach to the history of philosophy, the implications of PWL for understanding education and its history, the cross-cultural possibilities it opens up, the relationships between PWL, virtue ethics and philosophy of culture, and the different literary genres of PWL, including the way these genres impact the style and content of ancient, medieval and early modern philosophical works.
This work invites us to view the Pyrrhonist tradition as involving all those who share a commitment to the activity of Pyrrhonizing and develops fresh, provocative readings of Sextus, Montaigne, and Hume as radical Pyrrhonizing skeptics: From the aspirationalism of Sextan Pyrrhonism, to Montaigne’s skeptical fideism and his unusual approach to the writing process, to the vexing interpretive issues surrounding Hume’s skepticism, each figure offers us new insights into what it can mean to Pyrrhonize.
Proclus and the Natural Theology of Time
This is the first monograph dedicated entirely to Proclus’ theory of time, showing the roots of his obscure claim that time is a god and a cause in his reception of Plato, Aristotle, the Stoics and Plotinus. Proclus’ theory of time appears as a natural theology, a reasoned ascent to divine principles starting from natural phenomena (in particular, from natural cycles and their synchronization). This theological approach to time develops the pioneering psychological approach of Proclus’ predecessor Plotinus, anchoring time not in the world soul, but in the divine unchanging source of the world soul’s life.
Regards sur cinquante ans de recherche (1967-2017)
Volume Editors: Sébastien Morlet and Olivier Munnich
This volume gathers the proceedings of the Paris conference in Philonic studies (2017), consisting of 23 papers by contributors from 8 countries. Fifty years after the Lyon conference, it aimed at taking a retrospective look at the intellectual contexts and the academic fields in which Philonic studies have penetrated, as well as the ways in which they evolved.
The work of the Alexandrian became of major importance in the history of philosophy. It has been studied as a source of cultured Christianity, in connection with Second Temple Judaism and the Alexandrian Jewish community, but also in the context of research on rabbinic Judaism, New Testament and philosophy of the imperial era.

Ce volume rassemble les actes du colloque de Paris (2017), qui réunit 23 intervenants de 8 nationalités. Cinquante ans après le colloque de Lyon, il s’agissait de réfléchir aux milieux intellectuels et aux disciplines universitaires dans lesquels les études philoniennes avaient pénétré le monde de la recherche, les bases sur lesquelles elles avaient évolué. L’œuvre de l’Alexandrin a pris une importance majeure dans l’histoire de la philosophie ; elle a été explorée comme source du christianisme lettré, en lien avec le judaïsme de l’Époque du Second Temple et la communauté juive d’Alexandrie, mais aussi dans le cadre des études sur le judaïsme rabbinique, dans le développement des études sur le Nouveau Testament et sur la philosophie de l’époque impériale.
Exegete, Teacher, Platonic Philosopher
Volume Editor: Albert Joosse
This is the first collected volume dedicated to the work of the 6th-century CE philosopher Olympiodorus of Alexandria. His Platonic commentaries are rare witnesses to ancient views on Plato’s Socratic works. As a pagan, Olympiodorus entertained a complex relationship with his predominantly Christian surroundings. The contributors address his profile as a Platonic philosopher, the ways he did and did not adapt his teaching to his Christian audience, his reflections on philosophical exegesis and communication and his thinking on self-cognition. The volume as a whole helps us understand the development of Platonic philosophy at the end of antiquity.
Studies on Ancient Philosophy
Series Editor: C.J. Rowe
The online collection of Philosophia Antiqua the leading series specializing in books on Ancient Philosophy, covering the entire history of the subject from the Presocratics through Plato, Aristotle and the Stoics to the Neoplatonists of late Antiquity. This yearly Supplement contains 4 titles published in 2021. The full collection of Philosophia Antiqua Online contains 147 titles published between 1952-2017 and can be found here: 1brill.com/PHAO. The title list and free MARC records are available for download here.
Ancient philosophy has from the outset inspired phenomenological philosophers in a special way. Phenomenological Interpretations of Ancient Philosophy offers fresh perspectives on the manner in which ancient Greek thought has influenced phenomenology and traces the history of this reception. Unlike various related treatments, the present volume offers a broad account of this topic that includes chapters on Edmund Husserl, Martin Heidegger, Hans-Georg Gadamer, Jacob Klein, Hannah Arendt, Eugen Fink, Jan Patočka, Emmanuel Levinas, and Jacques Derrida.

This collection of essays, edited by Kristian Larsen and Pål Rykkja Gilbert, is addressed to students of ancient philosophy and the phenomenological tradition as well as to readers who have a general interest in the fascinating, yet complex, connection between ancient Greek thought and phenomenological philosophy.

Contributions by: Jussi Backman, Pål Rykkja Gilbert, Burt Hopkins, Filip Karfík, Alexander Kozin, Kristian Larsen, Arnaud Macé, Claudio Majolino, Hans Ruin, Thomas Schwarz Wentzer, Vigdis Songe-Møller, Tanja Staehler, Morten S. Thaning and Charlotta Weigelt.