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Giovanni Pico Della Mirandola’s Encounter with Scholastic Philosophy
Author: Amos Edelheit
This study explains how one of the remarkable thinkers of the Italian Renaissance, Giovanni Pico della Mirandola (1463-1494), broke new ground by engaging with the scholastic tradition while maintaining his ‘humanist’ sensibilities. A central claim of the monograph is that Pico was a ‘philosopher at the crossroads’, whose sophisticated reading of numerous scholastic thinkers enabled him to advance a different conception of philosophy. The scholastic background to Pico’s work has been neglected by historians of the period. This omission has served to create not only an unreliable portrait of Pico’s thought, but a more general ignorance of the dynamism of scholastic thought in late fifteenth-century Italy. The books argues that these deficiencies of modern scholarship stand in need of correction.
At the foundation of international law lies the notion of ius gentium or right of peoples, an idea that fully came into its own with the discovery of America and the effort to resolve the moral issues posed by the Spanish presence. Once Vitoria broadened the Augustinian concept of an international community by proposing the use of reason as the only criterion for membership in that community, it remained to formulate the laws needed to impose order on it. But before accomplishing that task, two questions must be accounted for: what is the nature of the ius gentium, and what is its relation to ius naturale? How theologians, philosophers, jurists sought the answers between 1500 and 1400 is the subject of this essay.
The Companion to the Spanish Scholastics offers a much-needed survey of the entire field of early modern Spanish scholastic thought. The volume introduces main themes and contexts of scholastics inquiry (Theology, Philosophy, Ethics, Politics, Economics, Law, Science and the Senses) through close examination of a wide range of texts, debates, methods, and authors, as well as in-depth discussion of the relevant literature. Chapters include a useful bibliography and serve as point of departure for future research. The volume not only draws the sum of existing research, but challenges established notions and breaks new ground.

Contributors are Fernanda Alfieri, Harald Braun, Paolo Broggio, Alejandro Chafuen, Wim Decock, Fernando Domínguez Reboiras, Thomas Duve, Petr Dvořák, Giovanni Gellera, Juan Manuel Gómez Paris, Christophe Grellard, Miroslav Hanke, Ruth Hill, Harro Höpfl, Nils Jansen, Vincenzo Lavenia, Thomas Marschler, Fabio Monsalve, Thomas Pink, Rudolf Schüssler, Daniel Schwartz, Leen Spruit, Toon Van Houdt, María José Vega, and Andreas Wagner.
For the first time, this book reconstructs the fascinating story of a series of anonymous "dialogues of the dead" published in Germany in the early eighteenth century. The texts stage fictional debates between some of the most famous thinkers of the seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries, such as Descartes, Leibniz, Thomasius and Bekker. The dialogues were originally published as cheap prints and very few copies now survive; until today the links between these texts and the very existence of this textual corpus have remained unknown. Starting from the little reliable information available, Riccarda Suitner conducts an exciting investigation of the authors, production, illustrations, circulation and plagiarism of these texts in the intellectual world of the early eighteenth century, proposing a new image of the German Enlightenment. The German edition of this book was awarded the prestigious Geisteswissenschaften international prize.
Machiavelli is chiefly known for The Prince, but his main considerations on politics are found in his later work Discourses on Livy. Despite this book's historical and theoretical importance, its complexity, length and style have often discouraged new readers and interpreters of Machiavelli from engaging with it. For this reason, the Discourses has not been given the attention it deserves. This volume of newly commissioned essays by some of the world’s leading Machiavelli experts seeks to remedy this deficiency. It is the first collective volume dedicated specifically to this profound work, covering topics such as Machiavelli’s republicanism, the relation between liberty and tyranny, the role of religion, Machiavelli’s conception of history, his writing style, his view of society as a plural and conflictive body, his suggestion of how a free state should be organized, and his notions of people and virtù.

Contributors: Jérémie Barthas, Thomas Berns, Alessandro Campi, J. Patrick Coby, Marie Gaille, Marco Geuna, Mark Jurdjevic, Cary J. Nederman, Gabriele Pedullà, Diogo Pires Aurélio, Fabio Raimondi, Andre Santos Campos, Miguel Vatter, and Camila Vergara.
In Nicholas of Cusa on the Trinitarian Structure of the Innate Criterion of Truth, Paula Pico Estrada offers an analysis of Nicholas of Cusa’s (1401-1464) unitrine conception of the human power of judgment, arguing that the innate criterion that guides human beings to their end is formed by a cognitive, an affective and a social dimension, and that it not only makes possible the systematization and evaluation of cognitive experience but also enables morality.
Based on a close reading of Cusanus’ philosophical treatises, the study deepens our understanding of Nicholas of Cusa’s epistemology, showing that his anthropological conception integrates philosophy and theology.
How did humans respond to the eighteenth-century discovery of countless new species of animals? This book explores the gamut of intense human-animal interactions: from love to cultural identifications, moral reflections, philosophical debates, classification systems, mechanical copies, insults and literary creativity.

Dogs, cats and horses, of course, play central roles. But this volume also features human reflections upon parrots, songbirds, monkeys, a rhino, an elephant, pigs, and geese – all the way through to the admired silkworms and the not-so-admired bookworms.

An exceptionally wide array of source materials are used in this volume’s ten separate contributions, plus the editorial introduction, to demonstrate this diversity. As eighteenth-century humans came to realise that they too are animals, they had to recast their relationships with their fellow living-beings on Planet Earth. And these considerations remain very much live ones to this day.
Ibrāhīm al-Kūrānī’s (d. 1101/1690) Theology of Sufism
Author: Naser Dumairieh
In Intellectual Life in the Ḥijāz before Wahhabism, Naser Dumairieh argues that, as a result of changing global conditions facilitating the movement of scholars and texts, the seventeenth-century Ḥijāz was one of the most important intellectual centers of the Islamic world, acting as a hub between its different parts.
Positioning Ibrāhīm al-Kūrānī (d. 1101/1690) as representative of the intellectual activities of the pre-Wahhabism Ḥijāz, Dumairieh argues that his coherent philosophical system represents a synthesis of several major post-classical traditions of Islamic thought, namely kalām and Akbarian appropriations of Avicennian metaphysics. Al-Kūrānī’s work is the culmination of the philosophized Akbarian tradition; with his reconciliation of Ibn ʿArabī’s ideas with Ashʿarī theology, Ibn ʿArabī’s ideas became Islamic theology.
This volume contains the editions of polemical texts by Erasmus against Martin Luther and Pierre Cousturier, of his defence against attacks on his oration on matrimony (and celibacy), and of his immensely popular ‘pocket’ edition of the Disticha Catonis.