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The new Companion to Erasmus in the Renaissance Society of America’s Texts and Studies Series draws on the insights of an international team of distinguished experts whose contributions are arrayed in eleven chapters followed by a detailed chronological catalogue of Erasmus’ works and an up-to-date bibliography of secondary sources.
The ambition of this companion is to illuminate every aspect of Erasmus’ life, work, and legacy while providing an expert synthesis of the most inspiring research in the field. This volume will be of invaluable assistance to students and teachers working in any of the numerous disciplines to which Erasmus devoted his tireless efforts, including philosophy, religion, history, rhetoric, education, and the history of the book.
The Philosophical Critique of Christianity in Late Antiquity and the Enlightenment
The present study, for the first time, provides a comparative analysis of the objections raised against Christianity by late antique pagan philosophers (esp. Celsus in Alethes logos, Porphyry in Contra Christianos, and Julian the Apostate in Contra Gali-laeos) and Enlightenment philosophers and freethinkers and examines the impact of pagan thinking on the critique of Christianity in the 16th to 18th centuries – in particular, on discussions concerning the authority of the Bible, biblical exegesis, the Christian concept of faith, religious coercion and the uniformity of faith, the belief in miracles, and the Christ-ian understanding of morality.
Volume Editors: and
The Renaissance witnessed an upsurge in explanations of natural events in terms of invisibly small particles – atoms, corpuscles, minima, monads and particles. The reasons for this development are as varied as are the entities that were proposed. This volume covers the period from the earliest commentaries on Lucretius’ De rerum natura to the sources of Newton’s alchemical texts. Contributors examine key developments in Renaissance physiology, meteorology, metaphysics, theology, chymistry and historiography, all of which came to assign a greater explanatory weight to minute entities. These contributions show that there was no simple ‘revival of atomism’, but that the Renaissance confronts us with a diverse and conceptually messy process. Contributors are: Stephen Clucas, Christoph Lüthy, Craig Martin, Elisabeth Moreau, William R. Newman, Elena Nicoli, Sandra Plastina, Kuni Sakamoto, Jole Shackelford, and Leen Spruit.
Teaching Cartesian Philosophy in the Early Modern Age
The volume offers the first large-scale study of the teaching of Descartes’s philosophy in the early modern age. Its twenty chapters explore the clash between Descartes’s “new” philosophy and the established pedagogical practices and institutional concerns, as well as the various strategies employed by Descartes’s supporters in order to communicate his ideas to their students. The volume considers a vast array of topics, sources, and institutions, across the borders of countries and confessions, both within and without the university setting (public conferences, private tutorials, distance learning by letter) and enables us thereby to reconsider from a fresh perspective the history of early modern philosophy and education.
Historical Trajectories, Indigenous Cultures, Scholastic Thought, and Reception in History
The Transatlantic Las Casas demonstrates the vitality of Lascasian studies. An impressive ensemble of scholars spanning the fields of Latin American studies, philosophy, theology, anthropology, law, literary criticism, and ethnohistory illuminate the complex intellectual web surrounding this controversial figure.
This volume offers sophisticated explorations of colonial Latin American and early modern Iberian studies in a single volume from Laura Ammon; Thomas Eggensperger, O.P.; Natsuko Matsumori; Timothy A. McCallister; Luis Mora Rodríguez; David Thomas Orique, O.P.; María Cristina Ríos Espinosa; Rady Roldán-Figueroa; Mario Ruíz Sotelo; Frauke Sachse; Rubén A. Sánchez-Godoy; John F. Schwaller; Garry Sparks; Vanina M. Teglia; Dwight E.R. TenHuisen; Paola Uparela; Ramón Darío Valdivia Giménez; Andrew L. Wilson, and Victor Zorrilla.
Sehen und Wahrnehmen in Optik, Naturforschung und Ästhetik des 17. und 18. Jahrhunderts
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Der Epoche der Aufklärung wird nicht nur eine besondere Vorliebe für den Sehsinn und das Licht nachgesagt, sondern auch ein bestimmtes ‚Wahrnehmungsmodell‘, das von dem Topos des kalten, distanzierten und klassifizierenden Blicks geprägt sei. Ausgehend von einem vereinzelt formulierten Zweifel an dieser Zuordnung sowie neueren Tendenzen in der Aufklärungsforschung geht die vorliegende Arbeit der Frage nach, ob sich ein solches Wahrnehmungsmodell im 17. und 18. Jahrhundert tatsächlich nachweisen lässt. Was wussten und wie dachten Naturforscher, Philosophen oder Optiker über das Auge und die Funktionsweise des menschlichen (und tierischen) Sehens? Es kann gezeigt werden, dass sich im Zeitraum von 1604 bis 1778 ein vielschichtiger Diskurs über Möglichkeiten und Grenzen der sinnlichen Empfindung entwickelt, der lange vor 1750 die physisch-psychische und kulturelle Bedingtheit des Sehens ins Zentrum rückt.
Between Secularization and Reform: Religion in the Enlightenment provides a critical reappraisal of the idea that the Enlightenment is at the headwaters of secularization. Contributors analyze early modern religious controversies, the significance of faith in national contexts, clandestine philosophy, varieties of rational religion, and the intermingling of heterodoxy with unbelief in the writings of key thinkers and less famous figures.
The volume encourages revisiting descriptions of the “Age of Lights” that use such categories as “moderate – radical” and “religious – secular.” Picturing the deep transformation undergone by religion in the Enlightenment, it draws a thin line between religious reforms and attempts to eliminate religious faith from the public sphere and individuals’ lives.

Contributors: Jeffrey D. Burson, Dominic Erdozain, Hasse Hämäläinen, Wojciech Kozyra, Ian Leask, Diego Lucci, Gianni Paganini, Stephen R. Palmquist, Mathias Sonnleithner, Anna Tomaszewska, Damien Tricoire, and Wiep van Bunge.
A Study of Christian Hermetism in Four Plays
Have you ever wondered why Cordelia has to die? Or how Alonso talks and walks about the isle while his body lies ‘full fathom five’ on the sea floor? Ever wondered why the monument to Shakespeare in the Church of the Holy Trinity in Stratford-upon-Avon names three pagans: Nestor, Socrates, and Virgil – king, philosopher, and poet? Or why Shakespeare is on Olympus, home of the Greek gods? This interdisciplinary study, the first to interpret the plays of Shakespeare in the light of the esoteric religious doctrines of the Corpus Hermeticum, holds answers to these and other puzzling questions.