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Mit dem auf vier Bände angelegten Werk wird erstmalig eine Ikonologie der christlichen Kunst im historischen Ablauf geschildert. Die komplexe Geschichte des Bildes in der Kirche wird ausgehend von der Intention der Darstellungen auf den verschiedenen Bildträgern aufgezeigt und die Weise der damit verbundenen Argumentation fundiert dargelegt. Eingebettet in allgemeine historische Entwicklungen wird der Wandel der Themenkreise beschrieben. In der Einleitung werden die Prinzipien der Arbeit erläutert. Teil 1 (Alte Kirche) behandelt die Entstehung einer christlichen Bildkunst am Grabe (auf Sarkophagen und in Katakomben) und den späteren Übergang in die Kirchdekoration. Nach gleichen Prinzipien werden in Teil 2 die Bildkunst des Mittelalters, in Teil 3 die der Neuzeit und in Teil 4 die andersartige Entwicklung in der Ostkirche geschildert.
Author: Paul Shore

Abstract

The forty-one years between the Society of Jesus’s papal suppression in 1773 and its eventual restoration in 1814 remain controversial, with new research and interpretations continually appearing. Shore’s narrative approaches these years, and the period preceding the suppression, from a new perspective that covers individuals not usually discussed in works dealing with this topic. As well as examining the contributions of former Jesuits to fields as diverse as ethnology—a term and concept pioneered by an ex-Jesuit—and library science, where Jesuits and ex-Jesuits laid the groundwork for the great advances of the nineteenth century, the essay also explores the period the exiled Society spent in the Russian Empire. It concludes with a discussion of the Society’s restoration in the broader context of world history.

In: Brill Research Perspectives in Jesuit Studies
Mit dem auf vier Bände angelegten Werk wird erstmalig eine Ikonologie der christlichen Kunst im historischen Ablauf geschildert.
Die komplexe Geschichte des Bildes in der Kirche wird ausgehend von der Intention der Darstellungen auf den verschiedenen Bildträgern aufgezeigt und die Weise der damit verbundenen Argumentation fundiert dargelegt. Eingebettet in allgemeine historische Entwicklungen wird der Wandel der Themenkreise beschrieben.
Im zweiten Teil stehen mit Blick auf die Neubegründung staatlicher Macht im Westen sowie die Scholastik zunächst Werke der Buchmalerei, der Kirchendekoration und der Ausstattung im Zentrum. Ein häufiges Phänomen ist hier die Argumentationsweise der Typologie. Mit der Gotik setzt sich ein neuer Naturalismus durch, der gesehene Wirklichkeit im Bild wiedergeben will und auch alte Themen verändert. Der Bildschmuck der Kathedralportale wird ebenso wie die zunehmende Komplexität der Altarretabel beleuchtet. Teils auf östlichen Einflüssen basierend, gewinnt im Spätmittelalter die Tafelmalerei, ebenso wie die neuen Medien der Druckgraphik (Holzschnitt und Kupferstich), in der Privatandacht wie im Wallfahrtswesen an Bedeutung.
‘Ecumenism’ and ‘independency’ suggest two distinct impulses in the history of Christianity: the desire for unity, co-operation, connectivity, and shared belief and practice, and the impulse for distinction, plurality, and contextual translation. Yet ecumenism and independency are better understood as existing in critical tension with one another. They provide a way of examining changes in World Christianity. Taking their lead from the internationally acclaimed research of Brian Stanley, in whose honour this book is published, contributors examine the entangled nature of ecumenism and independency in the modern global history of Christianity. They show how the scrutiny afforded by the attention to local, contextual approaches to Christianity outside the western world, may inform and enrich the attention to transnational connectivity.
In: Journal of Religion and Demography

Abstract

Using novel quantitative data from the Millennial Trends Survey administered online in March 2019 with over 2,500 respondents between the ages of 18 and 35 in both Canada and the U.S., we examine in detail inherited (non)religion as well as intergenerational conversion and disaffiliation among young adult birth cohorts. Key results include approximately two thirds of Millennials in our sample belonging to the same (non)religious tradition of at least one of their parents. Among the remaining one third who did have a different religious (non)affiliation than their parents at the time of the survey, intergenerational disaffiliation was the most common change present: especially in Canada, but also in the U.S. Intergenerational retention of nonreligion among families where both parents are nonreligious are especially high among Millennials in both countries, a characteristic of this generation’s much more secular social milieu.

In: Journal of Religion and Demography

Abstract

Since Pope John Paul II’s stock-taking of twentieth century martyrs, the Catholic Church has significantly increased the beatification and canonization of martyrs. Not only have the numbers of martyrs increased but the definition of martyrdom has expanded. Using a comprehensive new data set on Catholic martyrs (1588 to 2020), we argue that the Vatican’s recent emphasis on martyrs is a strategic response to competition with Protestants, specifically Evangelicals. Martyrs, unlike regular saints (confessors), tend to be predominantly male and died in parts of the world where the Catholic Church was actively involved in evangelization or had a significant presence. Martyrdom often associates with violent events, such as the Spanish Civil War, World War II, and the French Revolution, and with mass persecutions, such as in the English Reformation or in cases of repression of missionaries, as in Japan, Korea, Vietnam, and China.

In: Journal of Religion and Demography
Authors: Nadja Milewski and Sonja Haug

Abstract

This study examines women’s attitudes toward the own use of assisted reproductive technologies (ART) by their religious affiliation in Germany. The social relevance of ART is increasing in Western countries due to overall low birth rates, a high rate of childlessness, and a gap between the desired and the actual numbers of children. Previous literature has been scarce, however, on attitudes toward ART, and religious diversity has not been included in studies on ART. Our analysis is based on data collected in a pilot study in 2014 and 2015. The sample includes 944 women aged 18 to 50 living in Germany. The results show that Muslim women were significantly more likely than Christian women to say they would consider using ART; having no religious affiliation was associated with the least open attitude toward ART usage.

In: Journal of Religion and Demography

Abstract

The following tables represent the results of analysis of data on religion for all of the countries of the world which appear in the World Religion Database (Johnson and Grim 2008). These data are collected at the national level from a number of sources including censuses, surveys, polls, religious communities, scholars, and others.

In: Journal of Religion and Demography

Abstract

From space, the Pacific glitters in ocean blue. What might the world’s largest ocean contribute to missio Dei? A spiral methodology is used to trace connections between the baptism of Jesus, early Christian art, recent legal (Treaty of Waitangi Tribunal) research and indigenous knowing, including ocean voyaging, ancestor understandings of whirlpools, Māori water rites and oral history of river beings (taniwha).

The argument is that indigenous Oceanic (Māori) understandings of water, in conversation with baptismal narratives, present missio Dei as an immersion in God. Mission is located not in the activity of the church – and hence mission expansion as part of European colonisation – but in the being and becoming of God. Creation and redemption are interconnected and an environmental ethic is expected. Children of the waters (ngā tamariki o te Moana nui a Kiwa) listen to creation’s voice (taniwha speaking) and act for the life (waiora) of water.

In: Mission Studies