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Tibetan and Central Asian Studies in Homage to Rolf A. Stein
The Tibetan Gesar epic, considered “the world’s longest poem,” has been the object of countless retellings, translations, and academic studies in the two centuries since it was first introduced to European readers. In The Many Faces of Ling Gesar, its many aspects—historical, cultural, and literary—are surveyed for the first time in a single volume in English, addressed to both general readers and specialists. The original scholarship presented here, by international experts in Tibetan Studies, honours the contributions of Rolf A. Stein (1911-1999), whose studies of the Tibetan epic are the enduring standard in this field.
Contributors are: Anne-Marie Blondeau, Chopa Dondrup, Estelle Dryland, Solomon George FitzHerbert, Gregory Forgues, Frances Garrett, Frantz Grenet, Lama Jabb, Matthew W. King, Norbu Wangdan, Siddiq Wahid, Wang Guoming, Yang Enhong.
Black Neo-Victoriana is the first book-length study on contemporary re-imaginations of Blackness in the long nineteenth century. Located at the intersections of postcolonial studies, Black studies, and neo-Victorian criticism, this interdisciplinary collection engages with the global trend to reimagine and rewrite Black Victorian subjectivities that have been continually marginalised in both historical and cultural discourses. Contributions cover a range of media, from novels and drama to film, television and material culture, and draw upon cultural formations such as Black fandom, Black dandyism, or steamfunk. The book evidences how neo-Victorian studies benefits from reading re-imaginations of the long nineteenth century vis-à-vis Black epistemologies, which unhinge neo-Victorianism’s dominant spatial and temporal axes and reroute them to conceive of the (neo-)Victorian through Blackness.
Brill’s Companion to the Reception of Homer from the Hellenistic Age to Late Antiquity presents a comprehensive account of the afterlife of the Homeric corpus. Twenty chapters written by a range of experts in the field show how Homeric poems were transmitted, disseminated, adopted, analysed, admired or even criticized across diverse intellectual environments, from the late 4th century BCE to the 5th century CE. The volume explores the impact of Homer on Hellenistic prose and poetry, the Second Sophistic, the Stoics, some Christian writers and the major Neoplatonists, showing how the Greek paideia continued to flourish in new contexts.
How did humans respond to the eighteenth-century discovery of countless new species of animals? This book explores the gamut of intense human-animal interactions: from love to cultural identifications, moral reflections, philosophical debates, classification systems, mechanical copies, insults and literary creativity.

Dogs, cats and horses, of course, play central roles. But this volume also features human reflections upon parrots, songbirds, monkeys, a rhino, an elephant, pigs, and geese – all the way through to the admired silkworms and the not-so-admired bookworms.

An exceptionally wide array of source materials are used in this volume’s ten separate contributions, plus the editorial introduction, to demonstrate this diversity. As eighteenth-century humans came to realise that they too are animals, they had to recast their relationships with their fellow living-beings on Planet Earth. And these considerations remain very much live ones to this day.
Author: Annegret Oehme
This volume explores a core medieval myth, the tale of an Arthurian knight called Wigalois, and the ways it connects the Yiddish-speaking Jews and the German-speaking non-Jews of the Holy Roman Empire. The German Wigalois / Viduvilt adaptations grow from a multistage process: a German text adapted into Yiddish adapted into German, creating adaptations actively shaped by a minority culture within a majority culture. The Knight without Boundaries examines five key moments in the Wigalois / Viduvilt tradition that highlight transitions between narratological and meta-narratological patterns and audiences of different religious-cultural or lingual background.
Author: Michael Rand
This work contains a Hebrew and an English section. The former is an edition of the Maḥberot Eitan ha-Ezraḥi, a maqama collection composed after the pattern of al-Ḥarizi’s Taḥkemoni. The edition opens with an introduction, translated at the beginning of the English section. The rest of the English section is devoted to an analysis of that branch of the Hebrew maqama tradition that is rooted in the Maqāmāt of al-Ḥarīrī, starting from a review of the evidence for the presence of the Maqāmāt in the world of Hebrew letters, through the Taḥkemoni, and concluding with the Maḥbarot of Immanuel ha-Romi.