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ʿAbd al-Rahman Munif

Translator Sonja Mejcher-Atassi and Iman Al Kaisy

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Matthias Buschmeier

Abstract

This article reviews attempts to define histories of world literature during the late 19th and first half of the 20th century. It submits that “World Literature” and national philology are two sides of the same coin, in that they serve to produce specific national identities and legitimize colonial hegemonic practices. Astonishingly, some patterns of these early histories of world literature can still be observed in contemporary theoretical debates on the subject. Thus, it is argued that, rather than dismissing this heritage of Western historiography (with or without condemnation), we should strive seriously to come up with alternative histories, wherein “West” is no longer treated as synonymous with “world,” and vice versa. The West should be seen as just one form of society and culture among the many others, all of which are due consideration when invoking the term “world.”

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Translator Ksenija Vraneš and Branko Vraneš

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Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis

Translator Robert Patrick Newcomb

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Zhongshu Qian

Translator Longxi Zhang

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Hermann Hesse

Translator B. Venkat Mani

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In Quest of Ourselves

A Highly Important Matter

Ahmet Hamdi Tanpınar

Translator Evren Akaltun and Trevor Hope

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Theo D’haen

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Jernej Habjan

Abstract

The first Slovenian novel is yet to be read in a way that is both comparative and sociological. For while Slovenian studies treats the emergence of the Slovenian novel sociologically but not comparatively, comparative literature studies views it comparatively yet not sociologically. This gap can be filled by the perspective of the literary world-system. Moreover, this viewpoint can subtilize the thesis of Slovenian studies that the belatedness of the Slovenian novel is part of the belatedness of the Slovenian bourgeoisie as well as the comparatist thesis that the Slovenian novel became possible only after the end of the possibility of the traditional European novel. The world-systemic approach can grasp this belatedness as a social fact that speaks less of the Slovenian novel’s essence than of the structural relations between Slovenian culture and its European social environment.

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Taha Hussein

Translator May Hawas