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Die Stimmen der Fächer hören

Fachprofil und Bildungsanspruch in der Lehrerbildung

Edited by Michaela Heer and Ulrich Heinen

Lehrerbildung ist in Deutschland zunächst und vor allem Sache des Fachstudiums. Die Fächer tragen den größten Teil der universitären Lehrerbildung. Ihr Fachprofil und ihr Bildungsanspruch prägen die berufliche Identität und das Handeln von Lehrerinnen und Lehrern grundlegend.
In der aktuellen Diskussion um die Lehrerprofessionalisierung haben die ausbildenden Fächer eigentümlicherweise kaum eine Stimme. Bei der Weiterentwicklung der Lehrerbildung bleiben sie ungehört und werden in ihren Bildungspotentialen unterschätzt. Der Sammelband erschließt die fachlichen Perspektiven der lehrerbildenden Wissenschaftsdisziplinen auf die Lehrerbildung.

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Arts-Based Education

China and Its Intersection with the World

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Edited by Tatiana Chemi, Lihong Wang and Xiangyun Du

Core texts addressing creativity in a number of contexts show that creativity as a scientific subject has received principally the attention of Western scholars. Is this due to the fact that Western cultures are more creative or sensitive to creativity than the Eastern cultures? The editors strongly believe that this is more due to the differences in understanding and practising creativity in the West and East than to an Eastern indifference to creativity.

Arts-Based Education: China and Its Intersection with the World investigates the field of arts-based educational practices and research. It argues that reflections on these themes must necessarily be reframed and re-read beyond the limits of colonialist oppositions and suggests a constructive and reflexive approach to theory and methodology, which takes into account intercultural and critical perspectives in these studies.

This volume is the tangible product of the acknowledgement that China and Chinese culture deserves a more systematic and up-to-date dissemination through recent studies that bring together the arts, learning and creativity. It is clustered around two themes: (1) China and its communication with the world through arts-based education in international contexts, and (2) the development of arts education in China.
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The Imaginationless Generation

Lessons from Ancient Culture on Regulating New Media

Nachshon Goltz and Tracey Dowdeswell

In the present-day Tower of Babylon—the all-encompassing virtual world built of image layered upon image—children are the most vulnerable users. If we permit them unfettered access to media that promotes corporate and consumer values, while suppressing their cognitive development and creative imagination, then an ‘imaginationless generation’ may be our grim and inevitable future.

This book takes the reader, whether an academic, a parent or an educator, through a startling journey from the harms lurking in the virtual worlds—to children’s health and well-being, to how they deal with representations of violence and sexuality, as well as exposure to cyberbullying, advertising, Internet Addiction Disorder, and even exploitation. The most dangerous harm is unseen, and affects the innermost realm of a child’s psyche: the imagination. The authors discuss the current global regulatory framework that makes the protection of children ever more challenging. They discuss lessons learned from the ways that courts have negotiated free speech issues, as well as the research on parental mediation of children’s Internet use in the home. Finally, they move towards a bold new attempt at understanding regulation, by drawing lessons for new media from ancient culture.

In The Imagionationless Generation, the authors pioneer an attempt to address the real harms that children face in virtual realities by presenting a new and paradigm shifting theory—the Media Engagement. They follow the theory’s insights and predictions to offer a new perspective on a burning question of our time—how to protect children online. This multidisciplinary intellectual voyage and its insights are only possible by standing on the shoulders of scholars who have gone before, such as Ellul, Baudrillard, McLuhan, Postman and Piaget, to name a few.

As academics, parents and concerned human beings, the authors present here the results of more than twenty years of research in a way that should appeal to a wide variety of readers, as they stretch our understanding of the human-machine interface beyond right and wrong. This book shapes our understanding of media in the digital age in much the same way that McLuhan’s Understanding Media did for a previous generation.
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Teachers, Teaching, and Media

Original Essays about Educators in Popular Culture

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Edited by Mary M. Dalton and Laura R. Linder

Popular representations of teachers and teaching are easy to take for granted precisely because they are so accessible and pervasive. Our lives are intertextual in the way lived experiences overlap with the stories of others presented to us through mass media. It is this set of connected narratives that we bring into classrooms and into discussions of educational policy. In this day and time—with public education under siege by forces eager to deprofessionalize teaching and transfer public funds to benefit private enterprises—we ignore the dominant discourse about education and the patterns of representation that typify educator characters at our peril.

This edited volume offers a fresh take on educator characters in popular culture and also includes important essays about media texts that have not been addressed adequately in the literature previously. The 15 chapters in this volume cover diverse forms from literary classics to iconic teacher movies to popular television to rock ‘n’ roll. Topics explored include pedagogy through the lenses of gender, sexuality, race, disability, politics, narrative archetypes, curriculum, teaching strategies, and liberatory praxis. The various perspectives represented in this volume come from scholars and practitioners of education at all levels of schooling. This book is especially timely in an era when public education in the United States is under assault from conservative political forces and undervalued by the general public.

Contributors are: Steve Benton, Naeemah Clark, Kristy Liles Crawley, Elizabeth Currin, Mary M. Dalton, Jill Ewing Flynn, Chad E. Harris, Gary Kenton, Mark A. Lewis, Ian Parker Renga, Stephanie Schroeder, Roslin Smith, Jeff Spanke, and Andrew Wirth.
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Time for Educational Poetics

Why Does the Future Need Educational Poetics?

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Xicoténcatl Martínez Ruiz

In Time for Educational Poetics the author addresses a discussion in the context of today’s philosophy of education and educational research. Conceptually, educational poetics is not limited to a theoretical construction, but rather focuses on the creative, imaginative and poetic experience, to being recreated in the teaching-learning process.

Educational poetics is rooted in the philosophical and aesthetic thought of South Asia, specifically in how contemplative and creative practices re-introduced by Rabindranath Tagore. Educational poetics is the convergence of research in creative contemplation and poetic creation, practices of conscious attention and mindfulness, and practices of peace education and philosophy of non-violence. This book leads to a perspective in thinking about the risks that jeopardize the future of young generations.
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Emerging Trends in Learning Analytics

Leveraging the Power of Education Data

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Edited by Myint Swe Khine

The term 'learning analytics' is defined as the measurement, collection, analysis, and reporting of information about learners and their contexts for the purposes of understanding and optimizing learning. In recent years learning analytics has emerged as a promising area of research that trails the digital footprint of the learners and extracts useful knowledge from educational databases to understand students’ progress and success. With the availability of an increased amount of data, potential benefits of learning analytics can be far-reaching to all stakeholders in education including students, teachers, leaders, and policymakers. Educators firmly believe that, if properly harnessed, learning analytics will be an indispensable tool to enhance the teaching-learning process, narrow the achievement gap, and improve the quality of education.

Many investigations have been carried out and disseminated in the literature and studies related to learning analytics are growing exponentially. This book documents recent attempts to conduct systematic, prodigious and multidisciplinary research in learning analytics and present their findings and identify areas for further research and development. The book also unveils the distinguished and exemplary works by educators and researchers in the field highlighting the current trends, privacy and ethical issues, creative and unique approaches, innovative methods, frameworks, and theoretical and practical aspects of learning analytics.

Contributors are: Arif Altun, Alexander Amigud, Dongwook An, Mirella Atherton, Robert Carpenter, Martin Ebner, John Fritz, Yoshiko Goda, Yasemin Gulbahar, Junko Handa, Dirk Ifenthaler, Yumi Ishige, Il-Hyun Jo, Kosuke Kaneko, Selcan Kilis, Daniel Klasen, Mehmet Kokoç, Shin'ichi Konomi, Philipp Leitner, ChengLu Li, Min Liu, Karin Maier, Misato Oi, Fumiya Okubo, Xin Pan, Zilong Pan, Clara Schumacher, Yi Shi, Atsushi Shimada, Yuta Taniguchi, Masanori Yamada, and Wenting Zou.
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The way people act and work – and are enhanced or replaced by technology – in employment and practice settings in the future, will inevitably evolve incrementally or radically. This series considers probable, possible and preferable practice futures and employability, along with accompanying educational influences and support. Wisdom is a key dimension of our discussions of practice and education. The books in this series examine directions that are currently underway, future visioned and at the edge of imagination in transforming practices. The authors reflect on how these transformations are being or could be influenced by many factors including changes in society, nations and global connections, in the physical environment, workplaces (physical and virtual) and in the socio-economic-political contexts of the world and its nations. The authors in this series bring a rich range of practical and academic knowledge and experience to examine these issues. Through the conversations in these books readers can enter into these debates from multiple perspectives – work, organisations, education, professional practice, employability, society, globalisation, humanity, spirituality and the environment.
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The Writing Shop

Putting 'Shop' Back in Writing Workshop

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Suzanne Farrell Smith

Since the 1970s, writing workshop has been a go-to method for teaching writing. It’s helped students of all ages find their voices and stories while developing skills and craft. In The Writing Shop, the author reimagines what writing workshop can be. By studying workshops of different kinds—carpentry, textile, machine—she pushes us to see writing workshop the way other makers see their own shops, as places where creativity is fueled by the sensory experience. When the essential elements of all workshops are adopted in writing workshop, the author argues, writers will flourish.

The author builds on writing workshop literature to introduce the model to newcomers, while offering practical advice for those looking to strengthen their writing instruction. The Writing Shop illustrates what happens when writing is taught in an authentic shop: play is prioritized, all types of learners are included, and a host of skills beyond the mechanics of composition are embedded in the process of learning to write.

With its stories from diverse workshops and emphasis on exploration and experimentation, The Writing Shop shows us that learning to write can be, above all things, fun.
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Youth Work

Global Futures

Edited by Graham Bright and Carole Pugh

There is on-going debate in youth and community work regarding its future. Driven by processes of neo-liberal governmentality, youth work has been bent in new and uncomfortable directions. For many, this threatens the very telos of praxis. However, despite this, a passionate commitment to youth work’s values and approaches doggedly remains.

This edited volume invites academics working in different continents and contexts to move beyond a critique of youth work’s current state, towards imagining different professional futures. Rooted in the profession’s historic values, and drawing on the distinct political and cultural environments that have shaped youth work practice in different global locations, the authors explore possible new routes and approaches for the profession. These discussions are located geographically (in a devolved United Kingdom, Europe, United States, Australasia, and the Developing/Majority world) as well as across different sectors and approaches (voluntary sector, faith sector, online, young women’s work). The result is a rich picture of global practice. This provides both depth and perspective from which to gain new insights regarding possibilities for future practices, which imagine fairer and more participative societies.
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Lernen zwischen Gewohnheit und Leidenschaft

Zur Bedeutsamkeit des Sich-Einlassens im Erfahrungsvollzug

Stephanie Mian

Lernen zwischen Gewohnheit und Leidenschaft
Zur Bedeutsamkeit des Sich-Einlassens im Erfahrungsvollzug.
Welche Bedeutung kommt dem Sich-Einlassen im Lernen zu? Ist das Sich-Einlassen in der Schule, welche mit institutionalisierten Rahmenbedingungen, Anforderungen und Pflichten verbunden ist, überhaupt möglich? Welche Rolle spielt dabei das Lehren?
Diese Fragen beleuchtet Stephanie Mian aus einer umfassenden theoretischen und empirischen Perspektive, wobei sie das Lernen als responsives Geschehen in den Blick nimmt: Einen fremden Anstoß aufnehmend, verlassen Lernende Gewohntes und lassen sich auf Unbekanntes ein, wodurch sie sich auf dem Weg zu Neuem befinden: ein Weg, der mit Neugier, Interesse, Begehren sowie Scham, Zweifel und Leidenschaft verbunden ist.