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Volume Editors: and
There are few, if any, other educational philosophers that have left their mark internationally as John Dewey has. Author of 40 books and no less than 700 articles that appeared in over 140 journals, Dewey’s work has been translated into at least 35 languages. His landmark Democracy and Education – published over a century ago in 1916 – is one of the most cited educational texts ever.

Dewey has inspired educators and provoked controversies in his day, and still does so today. This volume sets out to engage with Dewey’s educational thought, especially as it relates to its circulation in the countries bordering on the Mediterranean. Authors consider his enduring influence, and reflect on the ‘push’ and ‘pull’ forces that served to anchor progressivism, in its multiple manifestations, in the region. The notion of a unidirectional force – personified by Dewey – that is somehow absorbed by the ‘receiving’ country is problematised by most if not all chapters in this volume. Rather, contributors carefully show how context affects a process marked by active appropriation, re-interpretation, adaptation, as well as resistance.

Sometimes a vibrant presence that still needs to be reckoned with, at other times a ghostly figure nevertheless serving to sustain democratic aspirations in and through education, Dewey and his message resonate, challenge, and demand a response.
In Ecocritical Perspectives in Teacher Education, the editors share a collection of chapters from diverse critical scholars in teacher education.

Teachers, and their students, are faced with demands that require teacher educators to work toward better preparing them to teach in a changed world—a world where diversity, human rights, sustainability, and democracy must be paramount. This text calls together teacher educators who address the complex ways that social and environmental injustices—like racism, sexism, classism, ableism, and speciesism—weave together to produce dangerous conditions for all life. The volume shares with readers a glimpse into alternatives possible for teaching that are situational, local, and in support of social justice and sustainability.

Contributors are: Marissa E. Bellino, Melissa Bradford, Greer Burroughs, Nataly Chesky, Brandon Edwards-Schuth, Alison Happel-Parkins, Kevin Holohan, Agnes C. Krynski, John Lupinacci, Emilia Maertens, Rebecca Martusewicz, Emma McMain, Michio Okamura, Clayton Pierce, Meneka Repka, Graham B. Slater, Silvia Patricia Solís, JT Torres, Rita Turner, Robert G. Unzueta and Mark Wolfmeyer.
An Introduction to a Phenomenological Approach to the Philosophical Study of Education
Author:
Is there room for philosophy in educational research? Where is phenomenology before and beyond its uses and abuses in the applied and social sciences? How are phenomenology and philosophy of education related? What are the methods of phenomenology within the field of philosophy of education? These talks to educational scholars and researchers respond to these questions and make an appeal for the place of philosophy within educational research and the tradition of phenomenology within philosophy of education. Across a broad genealogy of thought, with frequent substitutions and autobiographical confessions, these lectures work from and towards a simple article of faith: philosophy and education are not so different.
Volume Editor:
The use of images in education is expanding, but clear and comprehensive guidelines on how to carry out visual activities with students of a variety of fields are difficult to find. With the case studies from Finland, Canada, the United Kingdom, Australia, Japan, Poland, Turkey and the United States, contributors to this volume offer detailed reflections on the pedagogical role of using images in higher education. Examples include drawing, collage making, video production, object-based learning, photography projects, and many more. The book constructs a solid argument for the further development of visual pedagogies in higher education, highlighting the need to support students in advancing their visual competency as it has become fundamental to command in everyday life and professional contexts.

Contributors are: Gyuzel Gadelshina, Tad Hara, Joanna Kędra, McKenzie Lloyd-Smith, Gary McLeod, Olivia Meehan, Marianna Michałowska, Iryna Molodecky, Pınar Nuhoğlu Kibar, Paul Richter, Karen F. Tardrew, Rob Wilson and Rasa Žakevičiūtė.
Series Editors: , , and
Members of the ISATT represent a diverse group of teacher educator researchers and scholars from across the world who have interests in advancing understandings and practices related to teaching and teacher education. This ISATT Members Book series serves as a medium through which innovative research on teacher education theory and practice is mobilised and made accessible to scholars and practitioners. This book series features cutting edge scholarship that addresses ongoing and emerging challenges in teaching and teacher education.
Series Editor:
Contexts of Education is a new series of handbooks that embraces both a creative approach to educational issues focused on context and a new publishing credo.
All educational concepts and issues have a home and belong to a context. This is the starting premise for this new series. One of the big intellectual breakthroughs of post-war science and philosophy was to emphasise the theory-ladenness of observations and facts—facts and observations cannot be established independent of a theoretical context. In other words, facts and observations are radically context-dependent. We cannot just see what we like or choose to see. In the same way, scholars are argue that concepts and constructs also are relative to a context, whether this be a theory, schema, framework, perspective or network of beliefs. Background knowledge always intrudes; it is there, difficult to articulate, tacit and operates to shape and help form our perceptions. This is the central driving insight of a generation of thinkers from Ludwig Wittgenstein and Karl Popper to Thomas Kuhn and Jürgen Habermas. Increasingly, in social philosophy, hermeneutics, and literary criticism textualism has given way to contextualism, paving the way for the introduction of the notions of ‘frameworks’, ‘paradigms’ and ‘networks’—concepts that emphasize a new ecology of thought.
This new series is predicated upon this insight and movement. It emphasises the importance of context in the establishment of educational facts and observations and the framing of educational hypotheses and theories. It also emphasises the relation between text and context, the discursive and the institution, the local and the global. Accordingly, it emphasizes the significance of contexts at all levels of inquiry: scientific contexts; theoretical contexts; political, social and economic contexts; local and global contexts; contexts for learning and teaching; and, cultural and interdisciplinary contexts.
Contexts of Education, as handbooks, are conceived as reference texts that also can serve as texts.
Series Editor:
Critical Leaders and the Foundation of Disability Studies in Education aims to formalize the significance of early histories of understanding disability drawn from the scholarship of those who turned away from conventional status quo and pathologized constructs commonly accepted worldwide to explain disability in schools and society. The series begins with recognition of North American scholars including: Ellen Brantlinger, Lous Heshusius, Steve Taylor, Doug Biklen, and Thomas M. Skrtic. We will expand the series to include scholars from several international countries who likewise formed analyses that shaped the terrain for the emergence of critical perspectives that have endured and slowly given rise to the interdisciplinary field of Disability Studies in Education.

Critical Leaders and the Foundation of Disability Studies in Education is a sub-series to the book series Studies in Inclusive Education. The series and subseries have independent editorial teams that work closely together. For the volumes published in the main book series, please visit its webpage.
Series Editors: , , and
The ISATT conference series represents an effort to compile international research and practices on Teacher Education. It draws upon a variety of educational approaches, procedures, and teaching contexts where the field takes form. The aims and scope of the ISATT book series is to promote and bring together the best papers presented at the Biennial conferences of the association. The ISATT’s main goal is to increase insights into the identity, role, contexts and work of teachers, and the process of teaching.
Series Editor:
The aim of the Leaders in Educational Studies series is to document the rise of scholarship and university teaching in educational studies in the years after 1960. This half-century has been a period of astonishing growth and accomplishment. The volumes in the series document this development of educational studies as seen through the eyes of its leading practitioners.
A few words about the build up to this period are in order. Before the mid-twentieth century school teaching, especially at the primary level, was as much a trade as a profession. School teachers were trained primarily in normal schools or teachers colleges, only rarely in universities. But in the 1940s American normal schools were converted into teachers colleges, and in the 1960s these were converted into state universities. At the same time school teaching was being transformed into an all-graduate profession in both the United Kingdom and Canada. For the first time, school teachers required a proper university education.
Something had to be done, then, about what was widely regarded as the deplorable state of educational scholarship. James Conant, in his final years as president at Harvard in the early 1950s, envisioned a new kind of university-based school of education, drawing scholars from mainstream academic disciplines such as history, sociology psychology and philosophy, to teach prospective teachers, conduct educational research, and train future educational scholars. One of the first two professors hired to fulfil this vision was Israel Scheffler, a young philosopher of science and language who had earned a Ph.D. in philosophy at the University of Pennsylvania. Scheffler joined Harvard’s education faculty in 1952. The other was Bernard Bailyn, who joined the Harvard faculty in 1953 after earning his Ph.D. there, and who re-energized the study of American educational history with the publication of Education in the Forming of American Society: Needs and Opportunities for Study (University of North Carolina Press, 1960). The series has been exceptionally fortunate that Scheffler provided a foreword to the volume on philosophy of education, and that Bernard Bailyn provided a foreword for the volume on the history of American education. It is equally fortunate that subsequent volumes have also contained forewords by similarly eminent scholars, including James Banks of the University of Washington, who has been a creative force in social education for decades and the prime mover in the field of multi-cultural education.
The Leaders in Educational Studies series continues to document the growing and changing literature in educational studies. Studies conducted within the established academic disciplines of history, philosophy, and sociology comprised the dominant trend throughout the 1960s and 1970s. By the 1980s educational studies diversified considerably, in terms of both new sub-disciplines within these established disciplines and new interdisciplinary and trans-disciplinary fields.
Curriculum studies, both in general and in the particular school subject matter fields, drew extensively from work in philosophy, history and sociology of education. Work in these disciplines, and also in anthropology and cultural studies among others, also stimulated new perspectives on race, class and gender.
This volume, like previous volumes in the series, brings together personal essays by established leaders in a major field of educational studies. Subsequent volumes in the series will continue to document other established and emerging disciplines, sub-disciplines and inter-disciplines in educational scholarship.
Series Editor:
This series maps the field of critical theory and its role in articulating the central problems of education, schooling, culture, and human learning and development in the current historical social, political, economical and global situation. It aspires to build a consistent approach to philosophy and sociology of education from the viewpoint of critical theory, as well as new openings for the future critical theory of education. It will also examine examples of pedagogical experiments, new utopian thinking, and educational policies with a strong accent on actual policies and examples. Series will commission books on the Frankfurt School critical theory in relation to the question of education and social settings of human learning and development. It seeks authors who can demonstrate their understanding of the history and systematical issues in the tradition of the Frankfurt School in the setting of pedagogy, education and learning.