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Kimberly Dark

The Daddies is a love letter to masculinity, a kaleidoscope of its pleasures and horrors. The question “Who’s your Daddy?” started showing up in mainstream cultural references during the 1990s. Those words can be spoken as a question, or a challenge, as a flirtation, a joke, or a threat. It’s all about inflection, intention, and who’s asking. Apparently, we have so much shared cultural meaning about “Daddy” the speakers and listeners can simply intuit meaning and proceed to laugh at the joke, or experience the shame, as appropriate. But who is Daddy in American culture? The Daddies aims to find out more than who – but how the process of knowing Daddy can prompt readers to know themselves and their society. This allegory about patriarchy unfolds as a kinky lesbian Daddy/girl love story. Daddy-ness is situated in all people, after all, and we each share responsibility for creating a fairer world. The Daddies can be used as a springboard for discussion in courses in sociology, gender and women's studies, cultural studies, sexuality studies and communication. As a work of fiction, The Daddies can also be enjoyed by general audiences. "No one anywhere writes all the way through eros, power exchange, and sexuality more fiercely than Kimberly Dark. In The Daddies, Kimberly risks what most writers will not, opening up and asking how masculinity has woven through every realm of our existence, how it has seduced us, betrayed us, protected us, violated us, how it lives in men and women and every other gender and sexuality, how we are facing a reckoning. Kimberly Dark asks us to embrace and reimagine masculinity from the inside out and hold the embrace long enough to change the world." -Lydia Yuknavitch, author of Small Backs of Children and Chronology of Water "To say that The Daddies is an intensely textured, kaleidoscopic take on masculinity, Daddy-dom, and the pleasures, perils, and politics of femininity is only partly true. More accurately it is a hypersaturated, unrelenting Willy Wonka boat ride through a pulsating circulatory system of patriarchy, pain, and desire. Kimberly Dark has done something brave and difficult here, and I do not refer merely to the text." -Hanne Blank, author of Straight: The Surprisingly Short History of Heterosexuality “Feminist in its worldmaking, intellectual in its erotic poetry, and razor sharp in its depictions of contemporary American gender ideology, Kimberly Dark’s Daddies is a complex and genre-bending contribution to the archive of queer feeling and to theorising through storytelling. In this autoethnography of Daddy’s worlds, the girls who inhabit and work in them are allowed to examine pleasures and pains of power and contradiction. Taking a range of positions, Dark’s writing dares to interrogate the psychic structures and deep ambivalences of a queer desire and kinship form in ways that move us beyond simplistic ideas of perversion and subversion. Daddies is a welcome addition to fem(me)inist sexual theory and a portrait of contemporary patriarchy by and for daddy’s girls, by an author who has lived and survived and dared to tell. Plus we learn more about what is at the root of #metoo and its perpetual reproductions from this book than many other contemporary sources.” -Ulrika Dahl, co-author of Femmes of Power: Exploding Queer Femininities
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To consider gender and politics is to ask “Who has the power?” The Politics of Gender attempts to break through power structures by examining the institutional roles each play. This text takes several approaches to understanding the politics of gender, beginning with an introductory chapter focused on the major terms and theoretical approaches connected to political and gender studies.

Topics covered throughout the book include a historical discussion of the feminist movement, an analysis of the 2017 Women’s March on Washington, the nomination (and subsequent reactions) of Hillary Clinton, the impact Michelle Obama had for women of color as the first African-American First Lady, as well as the ways lesbian women’s bodies are scrutinized. In addition, this volume addresses the ways gender is litigated by examining the rights of lesbian women in Nigeria, the treatment of trans-gender people while in prison, and the connection between gun laws and intimate partner violence.

Finally, the reader receives suggestions for getting involved in their communities, resources for voting, reading, film and Podcast recommendations, all combined with the stories of two women who discuss the change they created in their communities.
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Places of Privilege

Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Identities, Change and Resistance

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Places of Privilege examines dynamics of privilege and power in the construction of place in a period of the rapid social transformation of places, borders and boundaries. Drawing on inter-disciplinary perspectives, the book examines place as a site for the making and re-making of privilege, while considering new meanings of community, and examining spaces for cultural identity and resistance. Chapters point to a range of conceptual resources that can be utilised to produce critical analyses of place-making. As the authors point out, power and privilege shape place but these dynamics are in turn shaped by the specific place based histories and social dynamics within which they are located.

Contributors are: Lutfiye Ali, Alison M. Baker, Paola Bilbrough, Tony Birch, Jora Broerse, Sally Clark, Josephine Cornell, Yon Hsu, Lou Iaquinto, Karen Jackson, Shose Kessi, Jacqui Lavis, Rebecca Lyons, Chris McConville, Nicole Oke, Amy Quayle, Alexandra Ramirez, Kopano Ratele, Christopher C. Sonn, and Ramón Spaaij.
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Navigating the Aspirational City

Urban Educational Culture and the Revolutionary Path to Socialism with Chinese Characteristics

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Lorin G. Yochim

The re-emergence of China as a world power promises to be the signal economic, political, cultural, and social development of the 21st century. In the face of its rise, fine grained accounts of the shape and texture of this new China are both timely and necessary.

Navigating the Aspirational City forwards a theory of contemporary Chinese urban educational culture that focusses on the influence of dominant conceptions of “the good citizen” and the material environment upon parents as they pursue their childrearing projects. The book provides a description of the beliefs and practices of urban Chinese parents as they “educate” their children. These beliefs and practices are placed in relation to a historical chain of ideas about how to best educate children, as well as within the urban context in which they are produced and reproduced, renovated, and transformed.

Beginning with a history of revolutionary “orders of worth” culminating in the “aspirational cité,” the book details the shifting standards that define the “human capital” conditions of possibility of a developed modern economy. It goes on to describe a set of policies and practices known as san nian da bianyang by which the whole of one particular city, Shijiazhuang, has been demolished, re-built, and re-ordered. Contemporary China is, the author contends, no less revolutionary than Mao’s project, noting that parents’ beliefs and practices articulate with the present ideational and material context to produce what appears, at times, to be radical transformation and, at others, remarkable stability.
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Conrad Hughes

Educating for the Twenty-First Century is an engaging account of some of the most critical challenges for humanity, seen through the unique perspective of a school principal.

A virtuoso performance of great imaginative force, the book takes the reader through philosophical reflections, humorous anecdotes, syntheses of cutting-edge research and examples of best practice, to answer fundamental questions about education and learning in the 21st century.

Provocative, touching, accessible, but always profound, the book is a must-read for policy-makers, school and university leaders, parents and anyone passionate about education and the future of the planet.

"A significant book, which makes it required reading for educators, public policy experts, indeed every thoughtful citizen of our time."
AC Grayling
Philosopher and Master of the New College of the Humanities

"An essential book for all those who are interested in the future of their children, in other words, the very future of humanity."
Luc Ferry
Philosopher and former Minister of Education, France
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The Drama of Reality Television

Lives of Youth in Liquid Modern Times

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Danielle T. Ligocki

In The Drama of Reality Television: Lives of Youth in Liquid Modern Times, the author offers a glimpse into the lives, viewing habits, and opinions of today’s Generation Z. While reality television is quite often viewed as just a guilty pleasure, the conversations that the author had with young people show that reality television is a major pedagogical force in the lives of young viewers.

This is compounded by our current liquid modern time period; a time in which everything is fluid, there are no solid bonds and people are disposable. The author shares the incredible conversations that she had with seven honest, insightful pre-teenagers to give us a deeper understanding of the ways in which just a ‘guilty pleasure’ is working to deeply impact the lives of young people.
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Developing Professional Memory

A Case Study of London English Teaching (1965-1975)

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Paul Tarpey

In Developing Professional Memory, the author examines narratives from ‘progressive’ and ‘radical’ London-based English teachers who began their careers between 1965 and 1975. English teaching in this period, which the author defines as a ‘cauldron’ of competing and contested currents, is often portrayed negatively in dominant discourses around the subject. The teachers’ narratives, however, provide a much more nuanced and positive story.

By recovering and documenting the collective Professional Memory of English teachers in a particular conjuncture, this volume offers a compelling practitioner account of events and developments and proves that learning from Professional Memory has transformative potential. The author argues that by critically confronting narratives, practices and existing conjunctural circumstances, current practitioners might develop greater agency in debates around their professional roles and responsibilities.
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All Souls College, Oxford in the Early Eighteenth Century

Piety, Political Imposition, and Legacy of the Glorious Revolution

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Jeffrey Wigelsworth

In the first detailed history of All Souls College under the Wardenship of Bernard Gardiner, Jeffrey R. Wigelsworth offers a character driven story that addresses scheming, duplicity, and self-righteousness projected against some of the most important political and religious episodes of the early eighteenth century and the people who animated them. Throughout this book, Wigelsworth illuminates the ways in which All Souls and its warden were caught between competing visions of what England, and consequently Oxford, would look like in the aftermath of the Glorious Revolution of 1688.
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Knowledge and Decolonial Politics: A Critical Reader offers the perspectives of educators and learners within current developmental settings, highlighting the systemic barriers faced whilst trying to implement decolonial pedagogies and practices. In the hope to challenge the dominance of Western Eurocentric thought in education and international development, the authors of this book offer counter narratives to promote the use of embodied cultural knowledges and histories, along with Indigenous perspectives, in order to subvert Western knowledge systems which are inherently colonial in nature. Changing education as we know it today requires creating spaces in which multiple knowledges can co-exist and benefit from one another. These spaces will ensure the continuity of decolonial practices and shape the intellectual politics of future generations.

Contributors are: Olivia Aiello, Nana Bediako-Amoah, Shirleen Datt, Chisani Doyle-Wood, Candice Griffith, Wambui Karanja and Lwanga G. Musisi.
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Pedagogies for Building Cultures of Peace

Challenging Constructions of an Enemy

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Catherine Baillie Abidi

Pedagogies for Building Cultures of Peace explores how normalizations of violence are constructed from the perspective of young adults and how pedagogies can be created toward building cultures of peace. Our findings show the diverse ways in which enmity (or the dehumanized other) is constructed, including through socialization processes, associating difference as deficient, systems of exclusion, disengaged citizenship, and cultures of competition and rivalry. Our results also show how critical adult education can reveal hidden forms of power embedded within normalizations of violence, creating opportunities for peacebuilding education. By collaboratively engaging in peace research with youth, and by explicitly exploring power as a central component of violence, violence transformation and peacebuilding education led by youth become imaginable.