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The educational world is experiencing exciting yet tension-filled times. We all wish to strengthen and support creativity and creative teaching in schools. Yet recent debates with regards to what “creativity” means, and how it should be implemented, raise the need for more specific approaches. Write a Science Opera (WASO) is one such approach. WASO is a transdisciplinary, inquiry-based approach to teaching at the intersection of art and science in schools. It is all about creative teaching and teaching for creativity.

Inquiry-Based Learning: A Guidebook to Writing a Science Opera provides teachers with the reasons and advantages to introducing pupils of all ages to WASO. It provides step-by-step instructions for how to implement WASO in classrooms. WASO is challenging, but the rewards are powerful: In WASO, it is the pupils’ curiosity and creative imagination which develop their science and art curriculum.

Get ready for an exciting, creative journey…

Abstract

This research explored the characteristics of students’ activities and their artifacts during their participation in climate change club projects and investigated the impacts of the club project participation on students’ ecological citizenship. Climate change club projects were developed to help students understand climate change, investigate climate change issues, and plan and participate in social actions. Participants developed scientific models of causes of climate change and were expected to develop the own perspectives about socio-scientific issues related to climate change. Five types of competences of ecological citizenship were targeted through club activities: knowledge and understanding, responsibility, justice, sustainability, and participation. Researchers found activities were student centered and interactive and artifacts generated by students were resources for social action. Climate change club activities demonstrated the potential for student participation in club projects to promote competence for mitigating climate change among future generations by fostering a new form of citizenship: ecological citizenship.

In: Asia-Pacific Science Education
Authors: Ji-Ho Kim and Chan-Jong Kim

Abstract

This study explored types and intensities of students’ emotions related to participation in school-based SSI club project related to climate change (CE). Ten high school students participated twice a week for 7 weeks in club activities to model causes/ impacts of CE, explore local problems related to CE, and plan and participate in social action. Researchers used the control-value theory to analyze how students’ emotions changed over time and found that while some initially reported negative emotions persisted after the club activities concluded (anxiety, fear, guilt, and despair), students also reported more positive emotions (sense of accomplishment, confidence) than before. Students’ emotions became more positive when planning and participating in social action and some emotions (guilt, anxiety, and expectation) helped to drive students to action. We discuss implications for club activities as a way to educate students about CE and we raise questions for future research.

In: Asia-Pacific Science Education

Abstract

This paper presents historical analysis of the development of science education in Singapore from 1997 to 2011 with the aim of understanding the impact of education initiatives introduced during this period known as the ability-driven phase in Singapore. To provide context for the research, the author first describes the state of governance and education in Singapore during this period and then provides an introduction to the Thinking Schools, Learning Nation vision, and two main educational initiatives: the Teach Less, Learn More initiative and the Information Technology Masterplan. Next the impact of these initiatives on science education is explored and the impact on science culture and science education in Singapore is discussed. The author concludes with a discussion about value of historical analysis examining the impact of policy on educational practice and a discussion about the implications of this research for science and science education in Singapore in the future.

In: Asia-Pacific Science Education

Abstract

Quality environmental education (EE) is key for supporting sustainable development and use of resources. Educators in rural India face considerable challenges to teach EE in K-12 school settings. This study took place in Assam in Northeast India where non-governmental organization (NGO) educators are working to develop an EE program for students in rural areas. To reveal students’ perceptions of the environment, researchers administered the Draw-an-Environment Test (DAET) to 277 middle school students in government schools. Analysis of students’ drawings of the environment revealed that while students recognized humans have an impact on the environment, they did not fully understand the impact could often be negative and drawings did not necessarily reflect the reality of the local environment. Implications for how these findings can be used to develop responsive EE curriculum that challenges and extends students’ conceptions of the environment and the need for future research are discussed.

In: Asia-Pacific Science Education

Abstract

This article introduces the reader to past, current, and future trends in science teacher preparation and professional development in Vietnam. The authors rely on document analysis for data collection and focused analysis to describe the general education system and the mechanisms for teacher training in Vietnam from the past to the present. Research questions focused on exploring changes in the organization of the education system over time, identifying advances that have been made, and describing what challenges teacher education faces today. In addition, this paper offers a special focus on how Vietnamese pedagogy institutions are working to prepare new teachers. Finally, the authors describe how Vietnam is preparing to implement a new national general education program that will strongly affect all aspects of education, including training and retraining of teachers. The authors conclude by raising some important questions for future research and development.

In: Asia-Pacific Science Education

Abstract

Climate change education (CCE) programs should foster citizen response to climate change by integrating knowledge/skill development with reflection on the need for actively changing current social systems and personal actions. An analytical framework was developed to examine 16 Korean and international CCE programs to identify (1) structure and content and (2) to categorize action-emphasized climate change education (AECCE) programs. Results show most CCE programs are for elementary levels and place emphasis on knowledge/skill development, but not on action. AECCE categorized programs were less structured, included more reflexive activities, and promoted more action. Korean AECCE programs offered online content and promoted action at the personal level. International AECCE programs balanced online/real-life content and promoted more action at the socio-political level. AECCE programs need to foster values/attitudes and to promote participation and action at all grade levels, should balance potential and practical components, and target both personal and socio-political levels of action.

In: Asia-Pacific Science Education

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine middle school students’ gestures during a geological field trip. Previous research on gestures has focused on understanding human development and exploring students’ gestures can be helpful in improving understanding of students’ communication in learning environments. In this study, middle school students from a gifted education center engaged in fieldwork along the Hantan-River to learn about and explain river formation processes. Using hermeneutics to interpret meaning from student gestures, researchers identified three types of frequently used gestures: deictic, imageable, and depictive, which served either a social communication purpose (explaining, asking, insisting, and giving evidence) or science communication purposes (visualization and temporal or spatial). Researchers offer implications about the role of gestures for helping novice learners communicate geoscience content and about the potential for gestures to be used by educators as an instructional resource for learners.

In: Asia-Pacific Science Education

Abstract

Metacognitive ability is enormously important for improving students’ learning performance. However, overconfidence bias may hinder students’ metacognition abilities. Therefore, in this study, we conducted an intervention to reduce or debias overconfidence among students using the KAAR (knowledge, awareness, action, and reflection) model. Ninety Indonesian undergraduate students were subjects of this study. Overconfidence scores were analyzed using paired sample t-tests in SPSS to compare the mean difference between pre- and post-tests. Next, their overconfidence patterns during the intervention were analyzed using R to perform group-based trajectory modeling (GBTM). Two main findings were noteworthy: Watching a video about overconfidence is likely the most significant activity of KAAR model in reducing students’ overconfidence, and, based on students’ overconfidence change during the intervention, trajectory analysis classified them into five groups. Recommendations for future intervention studies to reduce overconfidence among students are discussed.

In: Asia-Pacific Science Education
Editors: Nagla Ali and Myint Swe Khine
Three dimensional or 3D printing technology is a process of making three dimensional solid objects from a digital file. Currently, low cost and affordable 3D printers enable teachers, schools, and higher education institutions to make 3D printing a part of the curriculum. Integrating 3D printing into the curriculum provides an opportunity for students to collaboratively discuss, design, and create 3D objects. The literature reveals that there are numerous advantages of integrating 3D printing into teaching and learning. Educators recommend that 3D printing should be introduced to the students at a young age to teach STEM concepts, develop creativity and engage in team work – essential skills for the 21st century work force.

This edited volume documents recent attempts to integrate 3D printing into the curriculum in schools and universities and research on its efficacies and usefulness from the practitioners' perspectives. It unveils the exemplary works by educators and researchers in the field highlighting the current trends, theoretical and practical aspects of 3D printing in teaching and learning.

Contributors are: Waleed K. Ahmed, Issah M. Alhamad, Hayder Z. Ali, Nagla Ali, Hamad AlJassmi,Jason Beach, Jennifer Buckingham, Michael Buckingham, Dean Cairns, Manisha Dayal, Muhammet Demirbilek, Yujiro Fujiwara, Anneliese Hulme, Myint Swe Khine, Lee Kenneth Jones, Jennifer Loy, Kehui Luo, Elena Novak, James I. Novak, Joshua Pearce, Dorothy Belle Poli, Chelsea Schelly, Min Jeong Song, Sylvia Stavridi, Lisa Stoneman, Goran Štrkalj, Mirjana Štrkalj, Pamela Sullivan, Jeremy Wendt, Stephanie Wendt, and Sonya Wisdom.