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Lose Leute

Figuren, Schauplätze und Künste des Vaganten in der Frühen Neuzeit

Anhand von literarischen und historischen Textzeugen des 16. bis 18. Jahrhunderts beschreibt das Buch ›lose Leute‹ und ihre Künste jenseits der abwertenden Sammelkategorie des Vagabunden. Erstmals systematisch sichtbar gemacht wird auf diese Weise die kulturdynamische Bedeutung frühneuzeitlicher Mobilität.
›Lose Leute‹: Mit dieser Formel Harsdörffers unternimmt das Buch die (literar-)historische Bestandsaufnahme eines Gattungs- und Medienhorizonts des Vaganten, der sich von indizierenden Quellen (z. B. Liber vagatorum) über fiktionale Genres (z.B. Schelmenroman, Fastnachtspiel) bis zu ephemeren Textzeugen (z.B. Flugblatt, Theaterzettel) erstreckt. Im Mittelpunkt steht die Rekonstruktion zeitgenössischer Existenz- und Ausdrucksformen des Vaganten in Literatur, Musik und bildender Kunst. Auf diese Weise konturiert sich frühneuzeitliche Mobilität als neuer Forschungsgegenstand.
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Disasters of War

Perceptions and Representations from 1914 to the Present

Experiences of war and violence are engraved in historical memory for generations, influencing individual as well as collective attitudes in different conflicts.
Starting with World War I, the contributions in this volume examine such complex interrelationships using concrete examples, such as the presentation of soldiers and veterans in modern German art, the theatre of Brecht and Heiner Müller as well as representations of war in film and literature. The authors focus on the perception and cultural processing of war and violence and reveal astonishing examples of their aftereffects in the period from 1914 to the present.
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Margalit Finkelberg

In The Gatekeeper: Narrative Voice in Plato’s Dialogues Margalit Finkelberg offers the first narratological analysis of all of Plato’s transmitted dialogues. The book explores the dialogues as works of literary fiction, giving special emphasis to such topics as narrative levels, focalization, narrative frame, and metalepsis.


The main conclusion of the book is that in Plato the plurality of the speakers’ opinions is not accompanied by a plurality of points of view. Only one perspective is available, that of the narrator. Contrary to the widespread view, Plato’s dialogues cannot be considered multivocal, or “dialogic” in Bakhtin’s sense. By skillful use of narrative voice, Plato unobtrusively regulates the readers’ reception and response. The narrator is the dialogue’s gatekeeper, a filter whose main function is to control how the dialogue is received by the reader by sustaining a certain perspective of it.
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Early German Romanticism has long been acknowledged as a major literary movement, but only recently have scholars appreciated its philosophical significance as well. This collection of original essays showcases not only the philosophical achievements of early German Romantic writers such as Friedrich Schlegel and Novalis, but also the sophistication, contemporary relevance, and wide-ranging influence of their philosophical contributions. This volume will be of interest both to students looking for an introduction to romanticism as well as to scholars seeking to discover new facets of the movement – a romantic perspective on topics ranging from mathematics to mythology, from nature to literature and language. This volume bears testimony to the enduring and persistent modernity of early German Romantic philosophy.
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Literature as Document

Generic Boundaries in 1930s Western Literature

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Literature as Document considers the relationship between documents and literary texts in Western Literature of the 1930s. More specifically, the volume deals with the notion of the “document” and its multifaceted and complex connections to literary “texts” and attempts to provide answers to the problematic nature of that relationship. In an effort to determine a possible theoretical definition, many different disciplines have been taken into account, as well as individual case studies. In order to observe dynamics and trends, the idea for this investigation was to look at literature, taking its practices, its factual-looking and concrete applications, as a point of departure – that is to say, then, starting from the literary object itself.
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Beat Literature in Europe offers twelve in-depth analyses of how European authors and intellectuals on both sides of the Iron Curtain read, translated and appropriated American Beat literature. The chapters combine textual analysis with discussions on the role Beat had in popular music, art, and different subcultures.
The book participates in the transnational turn that has gained in importance during the past years in literary studies, looking at transatlantic connections through the eyes of European authors, artists and intellectuals, and showing how Beat became a cluster of texts, images, and discussions with global scope. At the same time, it provides vivid examples of how national literary fields in Europe evolved during the cold war era.

Contributors are: Thomas Antonic, Franca Bellarsi, Frida Forsgren, Santiago Rodriguez Guerrero-Strachan, József Havasréti, Tiit Hennoste, Benedikt Hjartarson, Petra James, Nuno Neves, Maria Nikopoulou, Harri Veivo, Dorota Walczak-Delanois, Gregory Watson.
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A Cultural History of the Avant-Garde in the Nordic Countries 1925-1950 is the first publication to deal with the avant-garde in the Nordic countries in this period. The essays cover a wide range of avant-garde manifestations: literature, visual arts, theatre, architecture and design, film, radio, body culture and magazines. It is the first major historical work to consider the Nordic avant-garde in a transnational perspective that includes all the arts and to discuss the role of the avant-garde not only within the aesthetic field but in a broader cultural and political context: the pre-war and wartime responses to international developments, the new cultural institutions, sexual politics, the impact of refugees and the new start after the war.
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Time, Consciousness and Writing

Peter Malekin Illuminating the Divine Darkness

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Time, Consciousness and Writing brings together a collection of critical reflections on Peter Malekin’s “model of the mind”, which he saw as a crucial yet often neglected aspect of critical theory in relation to theatre, literature and the arts. The volume begins with a selection of Peter Malekin’s own writings that lay out his critique of western culture, its overstated claims to universal competence and validity, and lays out an alternative view of consciousness that draws partly on Asian traditions and partly on underground traditions from the west. The essays that follow, commissioned for this volume, critically examine Malekin’s ideas, drawing out their implications in a variety of contexts including theatre, liturgical performance, poetry and literature. The book ends with an assessment of future prospects opened by this work.
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The Man Who Crucified Himself

Readings of a Medical Case in Nineteenth-Century Europe

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Maria Böhmer

The Man Who Crucified Himself is the history of a sensational nineteenth-century medical case. In 1805 a shoemaker called Mattio Lovat attempted to crucify himself in Venice. His act raised a furore, and the story spread across Europe. For the rest of the century Lovat’s case fuelled scientific and popular debates on medicine, madness, suicide and religion. Drawing on Italian, German, English and French sources, Maria Böhmer traces the multiple readings of the case and identifies various 'interpretive communities'. Her meticulously researched study sheds new light on Lovat’s case and offers fresh insights on the case narrative as a genre - both epistemic and literary.
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Récits contemporains d’endeuillés après suicide

Les cas Fottorino, Vigan, Grimbert, Rahmani, Charneux et Delaume

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Michèle Bacholle-Bošković

Cet ouvrage de Michèle Bacholle est le premier à examiner des écrits autobiographiques de romanciers français contemporains endeuillés après suicide. Alors que les livres de Fottorino et Vigan permettent une réflexion sur la famille, la filiation et les secrets (aux effets pathogènes et transgénérationnels), ceux de Grimbert et Rahmani montrent comment l’Histoire (l’Holocauste et les massacres des harkis) ont causé des suicides retardés. Charneux et Delaume ouvrent, eux, une discussion sur les enfants endeuillés après suicide. Puisant dans la psychologie et la suicidologie, ce livre montre les stratégies utilisées pour dire l’indicible et que l’écriture permet une restructuration de soi. En explorant le suicide et les tenants et aboutissants de ce deuil particulier, il lève aussi un tabou.

Michèle Bacholle’s book is the first to examine autobiographical writings by contemporary French novelists, survivors of another person’s suicide. While Fottorino’s and Vigan’s books allow a reflection on family, filiation, and family secrets (with their pathogenic and transgenerational effects), Grimbert’s and Rahmani’s show how History (the Holocaust and the harkis’ massacres at the end of the Algerian War) caused delayed suicides, and Charneux and Delaume open a discussion on children as suicide survivors. Using sources in psychology and suicidology, beyond showing the strategies these writers use to tell the unspeakable and how writing enables self-restructuration, this book breaks a taboo by exploring suicide and the ins and outs of its specific kind of mourning.