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Volume Editors: Mati Laur and Karsten Brüggemann
Die „Forschungen zur baltischen Geschichte“ sind das führende wissenschaftliche Periodikum zur Geschichte der drei Staaten Estland, Lettland und Litauen. In dieser Nummer geht es um den Alltag finnischer Bauarbeiter in der Estnischen SSR in den 1970er Jahren, religiöse Polemiken im Mittelalter und um die Frage, ob Herder tatsächlich das Litauische nicht vom Lettischen unterscheiden konnte. Die Leserschaft wird zudem an eine mittelalterliche Tafel voller leckerer Fischspeisen geladen, betrachtet litauische Gedenkpraktiken in der Zwischenkriegszeit und diskutiert die Erinnerungen von estnischen Kommunisten sowie die Rezeption des estnischen Schriftstellers Jaan Kross in der Lettischen SSR.
The Policy of Belarusization, 1924-1929
Author: Alena Marková
The book sheds light on processes of Belarusian nation-building and identity formation during the interwar period. It provides a complete analysis of the Soviet policy of Belarusization in interwar Belarus (1924-1929).

The analysis covers issues pertaining to the formation of national identity, the incorporation of the Belarusian national language into educational and administrative spheres within the policy of Belarusization and its acceptance by the dif-
ferent strata of the multi-ethnic society in the BSSR of that period. The monograph also sheds light on the reasons for the launching and ceasing of that policy as well as on the interrelation between the Communist Party and the
Belarusian national intelligentsia.
Russian Literature for Children and Teens, 1991–2017
Growing Out of Communism explores the rise of a new body of literature for children and teens following the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991 and the subsequent transformation of the publishing industry.
Lanoux, Herold, and Bukhina first consider the Soviet foundations of the new literature, then chart the huge influx of translated literature into Russia in the 1990s. In tracing the development of new literature that reflects the lived experiences of contemporary children and teens, the book examines changes to literary institutions, dominant genres, and archetypal heroes. Also discussed are the informal networks and online reader responses that reflect the views of child and teen readers.
Series Editors: Christina Lodder and Jeffrey Brooks
Original work on the culture and history of Russia throughout the centuries; cultural, ethnic and national identity, social and political history, popular culture, visual and performing arts, architecture and cinema, gender studies, children and youth culture, oral history and memory.

Until Volume 22, the series was published by Brill, click here.

The series published an average of 1,5 volumes per year over the last 5 years.
Z. Anthony Kruszewski in Wartime Europe and Postwar America
Author: Beata Halicka
Beata Halicka’s masterly narrated biography is the story of an extraordinary man and leading intellectual in the Polish-American community. Z. Anthony Kruszewski was first a Polish scout fighting in World War II against the Nazi occupiers, then a Prisoner of War/Displaced Person in Western Europe. He was stranded as a penniless immigrant in post-war America and eventually became a world-renowned academic.
Kruszewski’s almost incredible life stands out from his entire generation. His story is a microcosm of 20th-century history, covering various theatres and incorporating key events and individuals. Kruszewski walks a stage very few people have even stood on, both as an eye-witness at the centre of the Second World War, and later as vice-president of the Polish American Congress, and a professor and political scientist at world-class universities in the USA. Not only did he become a pioneer and a leading figure in Borderland Studies, but he is a borderlander in every sense of the word.
Author: Anna Muś
In The Political Potential of Upper Silesian Ethnoregionalist Movement: A Study in Ethnic Identity and Political Behaviours of Upper Silesians Anna Muś offers a study on the phenomenon of ethnoregionalism in one of the regions in Poland. Since 1945, ethnopolitics in Poland have been based on the so-called assumption of the ethnic homogeneity of the Polish nation. Even the transformation of the political system to a fully democratic one in 1989 did not truly change it. However, over the last three decades, we can observe growing discontent in Upper Silesia and the politicisation of Silesian ethnicity. This is happening in a region with its own history of autonomy and culturally diversified society, where an ethnoregionalist political movement appeared already in 1989.
U.S. and Soviet Cultural Diplomacy, 1945–1990
In Cold War in Universities: U.S. and Soviet Cultural Diplomacy, 1945–1990 Natalia Tsvetkova recounts how the United States and the Soviet Union aspired to transform overseas academic institutions according to their political aims during the Cold War.
The book depicts how U.S. and Soviet attempts to impose certain values, disciplines, teaching models, structures, statutes, and personnel at universities in divided Germany, Afghanistan, Ethiopia, both Vietnams, and Cuba as well as Guatemala were foiled by sabotage, ignorance, and resistance on the part of the local academic elite, particularly professors.
Often at odds with local academic communities, U.S. and Soviet university policies endured unexpected frustrations as their efforts toward Americanization and Sovietization faced developmental setbacks, grassroots resistance, and even political fear.