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Zwischen Biafra und Bonn

Hungerkatastrophen und Konsumkritik im deutschen Katholizismus 1958–1979

Johannes Stollhof

Hungerkatastrophen der sogenannten „Dritten Welt“ prägten die Wahrnehmung einer ganzen Generation in der Bonner Republik: Das „Biafrakind“ weckte enorme Emotionen und forderte zu umfangreichen Hilfsaktionen heraus, „Biafra“ wurde aber auch zur Chiffre für die neue Herausforderung globaler Gerechtigkeit.

Erstmals werden in diesem Band die Auswirkungen des weltweiten Hungerszenarios auf den Katholizismus in Deutschland behandelt. Im Kontext neuer gesellschaftlicher Bewegungen trat in Teilen engagierter Katholiken die politische Aktion für die „Dritte Welt“ an die Stelle des traditionellen Verständnisses karitativer Fürsorge und Hilfe und löste im Kampf um gerechtere Utopien heftige Konflikte aus. Ihr Engagement trug kirchlichen Institutionen jedoch auch viele Sympathien ein und ermöglichte ihnen bis heute geltenden Einfluss im entwicklungspolitischen Bereich.
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Katholische Arbeiter im Mutterland der Reformation

Konfession und Arbeitsmigration in Sachsen 1871–1914

Benjamin Gallin

Die Arbeitsmigration brachte im späten 19. Jahrhundert Bewegung in die konfessionelle Landkarte Mitteldeutschlands: Als „boomende“ Industrieregion zog das Königreich Sachsen nach 1871 massenhaft katholische Arbeiter aus dem Habsburgerreich und den preußischen Ostprovinzen an.

Die Migranten kamen in ein Land mit einem ausgeprägten protestantischen Bewusstsein und zugleich in eine Hochburg der sozialdemokratischen Arbeiterbewegung. Im Mittelpunkt der Studie stehen die Vorstellungen religiöser und gesellschaftlicher Zugehörigkeit, die sich in dieser Situation herausbildeten. Methodisch innovativ und sprachlich gewandt gelingt es dem Autor, die Integrationsprozesse einer sozialen und religiösen Minderheit historisch verstehbar zu machen.
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Hannah W. Matis

In The Song of Songs in the Early Middle Ages, Hannah W. Matis examines how the Song of Songs, the collection of Hebrew love poetry, was understood in the Latin West as an allegory of Christ and the church. This reading of the biblical text was passed down via the patristic tradition, established by the Venerable Bede, and promoted by the chief architects of the Carolingian reform. Throughout the ninth century, the Song of Songs became a text that Carolingian churchmen used to think about the nature of Christ and to conceptualize their own roles and duties within the church. This study examines the many different ways that the Song of Songs was read within its early medieval historical context.
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The Yearbook of Chinese Theology is an international, ecumenical and fully peer-reviewed annual that covers Chinese Christianity in the areas of Biblical Studies, Church History, Systematic Theology, Practical Theology, and Comparative Religions. It offers genuine Chinese theological research previously unavailable in English, by top scholars in the study of Christianity in China.

The 2018 volume highlights the five-disciplines of Jingjiao theology and its guest editors are Prof. Xiaofeng Tang from China Academy of Social Sciences and Donghua Zhu from Tsinghua University. Further contributions are from: Paulos Huang and Donghua Zhu, David Tam, Chengyong Ge, Daniel Yeung, Melville Stewart, Mar Aprem Metropolitan, Xiaofeng Tang and Yingying Zhang, Fuxue Yang and Wenjing Xue, Donald Wang, Xiaoping Yin, Zhu Li-Layec, Lanping Wang and Qiaosui Zhang.
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Vietnamese Evangelicals and Pentecostalism

The Politics of Divine Intervention

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Vince Le

This book offers an analysis of the historical, theological, and social conditions that give rise to the growth of pentecostalism among contemporary Vietnamese evangelicals. Emerging from the analysis is an understanding of how underprivileged evangelicals have utilized the pentecostal emphasis on divine intervention in their pursuit of the betterment of life amid religious and ethnic marginalization. Within the context of the global growth of pentecostalism, Vietnamese Evangelicals and Pentecostalism shows how people at the grassroots marry the deeply local-based meaning dictated by the particularity of living context and the profoundly universal truth claims made by a religion aspiring to reach all four corners of the earth to enhance life.
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The Spirit, Indigenous Peoples and Social Change

Māori and a Pentecostal Theology of Social Engagement

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Michael J. Frost

In The Spirit, Indigenous Peoples and Social Change Michael Frost explores a pentecostal theology of social engagement in relation to Māori in New Zealand. Pentecostalism has had an ambiguous relationship with Māori and, in particular, lacks a robust and coherent theological framework for engaging in issues of social concern. Drawing on a number of interviews with Māori pentecostal leaders and ministers, Frost explores the transformative role of pentecostal experience for Māori cultural identity, a holistic theology of mission, an indigenous prophetic emphasis, and consequent connections between pentecostalism and liberation. He thus contributes a way forward for pentecostal theologies of social change in relation to Māori, with implications for pentecostalism and indigenous peoples in the West.
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Scriptural Interpretation at the Interface between Education and Religion examines prominent texts from Jewish, Christian, and Islamic communities with a view to determining to what extent education ( Bildung) represents the precondition, the central feature and/or the aim of the interpretation of 'Holy Scripture' in antiquity. In particular, consideration is given to the exegetical techniques, the hermeneutical convictions and the contexts of intercultural exchange which determine the process of interpretation. The volume contains, in turn, a methodological reflection as well as investigations of scriptural interpretation in Jewish texts from the 2nd and 1st centuries B.C.E., in New Testament writings, and in witnesses from late ancient Christianity and in the Qur’an. Finally, it contains a critical appraisal of the scholarly oeuvre of Hans Conzelmann. This work thus fosters scholarly understanding of the function of scriptural interpretation at the interface between education and religion.
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Fiona Leach

Reclaiming the Women of Britain’s First Mission to Africa is the compelling story of three long-forgotten women, two white and one black, who lived, worked and died on the Church Missionary Society’s first overseas mission at the dawn of the nineteenth century. It was a time of momentous historical events: the birth of Britain’s missionary movement, the creation of its first African colony as a home for freed slaves, and abolition of the slave trade. Casting its long shadow over much of the women’s story was the protracted war with Napoleon.

Taking as its starting point a cache of fifty letters from the three women, the book counters the prevailing narrative that early missionary endeavour was a uniquely European and male affair, and reveals the presence of a surprising number of women, among them several with very forceful personalities. Those who are interested in women’s life history, black history, the history of the slave trade and British evangelism will find this book immensely enjoyable.
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During its Qajar period (1210–1344/1795–1925), Iran witnessed some lively and significant philosophical discourse. Yet apart from studies devoted to individual figures such as Mullā Hādī Sabzawārī and Shaykh Aḥmad Aḥsāʾī, modern scholarship has paid little attention to the animated discussions and vibrant traditions of philosophy that continued in Iran during this period. The articles assembled in this book present an account of the life, works and philosophical challenges taken up by seven major philosophers of the Qajar period. As a collection, the articles convey the range and diversity of Qajar philosophical thinking. Besides indigenous thoughts, the book also deals with the reception of European philosophy in Iran at the time.
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Nicodemites

Faith and Concealment between Italy and Tudor England

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M. Anne Overell

In Nicodemites: Faith and Concealment Between Italy and Tudor England, Anne Overell examines a rarely glimpsed aspect of sixteenth-century religious strife: the thinkers, clerics and rulers who concealed their faith. This work goes beyond recent scholarly interest in conformity to probe inward dilemmas and the spiritual and cultural meanings of pretence. Among the dissimulators who appear here are Cardinal Reginald Pole and his circle in Italy and in England, and also John Cheke and William Cecil. Although Protestant and Catholic polemicists condemned all Nicodemites, most of them survived reformation violence, while their habits of silence and secrecy became influential. This study concludes that widespread evasion about religious belief contributed to the erratic development of toleration.

'Anne Overell is an accomplished practitioner of history as a sideways glance, revealing subtleties and contours that others have missed. In doing so, she enriches the story of the Reformation and helps us see its humanity and nuance more vividly and completely.'
Diarmaid MacCulloch