List of Contributors

in Disrupting Shameful Legacies
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List of Contributors

About the Editors

Claudia Mitchell

is a James McGill Professor in the Faculty of Education, McGill University, Montreal, Canada, and is an Honorary Professor at the University of KwaZulu-Natal in South Africa. Her research cuts across visual and other participatory methodologies in relation to youth, gender and sexuality, girls’ education, teacher identity, and critical areas of international development linked to gender and HIV and AIDS. She has authored and co-edited numerous books related to participatory visual methodologies, teaching and teacher education. She is the Editor-in-Chief of Girlhood Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal.

Relebohile Moletsane

is Professor and John Langalibalele Dube Chair in Rural Education in the School of Education at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Using participatory visual methods, her research focuses on rural education, girlhood studies, and gender-based violence in rural schools and communities. She is the co-author (with Claudia Mitchell and Naydene de Lange) of Participatory Visual Methodologies: Social Change, Community and Policy (2017).

About the Contributors

Jennifer Altenberg

is a Michif woman from the Prince Albert, Duck Lake area in Saskatchewan. Currently located in Saskatoon, Canada, Jennifer has been an educator living and working in the Pleasant Hill community for the past nine years. Jennifer’s work as an educator empowers young people by sharing Michif/Metis and culturally respectful content in the classroom and in the community. She has spent many years deconstructing current pedagogical processes in the education system and enhancing Michif identity and unity throughout the community. She is a graduate of the Saskatchewan Urban Native Teachers Education Program at the University of Saskatchewan and completed her Masters in Educational Foundations with a focus on anti-racist/anti-oppressive education. Jennifer believes that being in touch and working with community is how we will continue to foster a strength-based approach to support and enhance a generation of proud young Indigenous women. The idea of self-love as a form of resistance to colonial discourse inspires the work she does in the classroom and in the Saskatoon community.

Marianne Adam

was enrolled for her Master’s study in education at the Nelson Mandela University, Port Elizabeth, South Africa, when she unexpectedly passed away. She initiated research as social change work using participatory visual methodologies to address gender-based violence with a group of secondary school girls—the Young Girls Leading Change—living in a rural area in Eastern Cape, South Africa.

Chantal Adams

comes from a long lineage (through time immemorial) of strong Haida people through her father’s family and a relatively long line (from the 1600s) of European settlers through her mother’s lineage. She is continually walking between two worlds. Chantal is currently an undergraduate student in the School of Child and Youth Care at the University of Victoria, Canada. She began writing about colonial violence against First Nations people at the age of 14. She continues to pursue her passion for exposing colonial violence and illuminating the importance of culture and Indigenous ways of being though her studies.

Twinky Banda

completed Grade 12 in South Africa in 2016 and is currently working towards becoming an auxiliary social worker. She enjoys working with children and is currently a student at Micheal Mas College, South Africa.

Hannah Battiste

born and raised in the Mi’kmaq community of Eskasoni, is a student in the Social Services program at Nova Scotia Community College, Canada. Drawing on her own life experiences and personal mental health challenges, she is a published poet, motivational speaker, activist in the area of injustice and social awareness, and artist. Her work has positioned her as a community and school role model. She has worked as a youth researcher on various projects focused on issues such as youth resilience and sexual violence for the past four years, and volunteered with Eskasoni Mental Health Services.

Anna Chadwick

is a child and youth art therapist and artist in northern British Columbia, Canada, and graduate student at the School of Child and Youth Care at the University of Victoria. For her graduate thesis Anna is conducting community and art-based research to support girls in the north to strengthen cultural identity and advocate for social change in their communities. Anna recently received the School of Child and Youth Care Agnes Shahariw Memorial Scholarship at the University of Victoria and co-published “Engaging with the Messiness of Place in Early Childhood Education and Art Therapy: Exploring Animal Relations, Traditional Hide, and Drum” in Canadian Children (2017).

Lisa Christmas

is a Mi’kmaq woman from Membertou who was born and raised in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada. She is currently finishing her BA in Psychology at Mount Saint Vincent University and working part-time as well. She aspires to continue her education and eventually have a career working alongside Indigenous women and youth.

Sandrina de Finney

is an Associate Professor and graduate advisor in the School of Child and Youth Care, University of Victoria, Canada. As lead researcher with the Sisters Rising and Siem Smun’eem Indigenous Child Well-being Research Network, she focuses on recentering customary caretaking laws for Indigenous children and youth who are displaced from their traditional territories, communities, and families. Her primary areas of research are child welfare, including kinship care and custom adoptions; girlhood, gender studies and gender-based violence prevention; and Indigenous community- and youth-engaged research.

Naydene de Lange

is Emeritus Professor in the Faculty of Education at the Nelson Mandela University, Port Elizabeth, South Africa. Her research focuses on using participatory visual methodologies in addressing gender and HIV and AIDS issues, and integrating HIV and AIDS into Higher Education curricula. Her Educational Psychology background and interest in Inclusive Education provides a research-as-social-change’ framework for the inclusion of marginalised populations.

Zaynab Essack

is a Senior Research Specialist in the Human and Social Development (HSD) programme at the Human Sciences Research Council, South Africa, and an Honorary Research Fellow at the School of Law, University of KwaZulu-Natal. She is a Research Psychologist with a PhD in Psychology from the University of KwaZulu-Natal. Her research is in the areas of research ethics, HIV prevention among key populations, with a focus on adolescents, and sexual and reproductive health rights.

María Ezcurra

is working in several art initiatives at McGill University, Montreal, Canada. Besides collaborating in the Institute for Human Development and Well-being, she works as Art-Mediator for the Faculty of Education and as an Artist-in-Residency for IPLAI, and is involved in the McGill Art Hive Initiative. She holds a PhD in Fine Arts and has participated in numerous exhibits worldwide, and is currently developing a collaborative art project for the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts. Her areas of research interest are arts-based research, participatory visual methods, collaborative art practices, feminist art education, dress and textiles, gender-based violence, identity, and immigration.

Sarah Flicker

is an Associate Professor in the Faculty of Environmental Studies at York University in Canada. Her research focuses on youth environmental, sexual, and reproductive justice. More broadly, she is interested in community-based participatory methodologies and ethics. Sarah is active in a number of research teams that focus on supporting youth to share their truths and own their power. She is a proud mother of two.

Marnina Gonick

is Canada Research Chair in Gender at Mount St Vincent University and Professor in the Faculty of Education and Department of Women’s Studies. She is the author of Between Femininities: Ambivalence, Identity and the Education of Girls (2003) the co-author of Young Femininity: Girlhood, Power and Social Change (2005) and co-editor of Becoming Girl: Collective Biography and the Production of Girlhood (2014). Her articles have been published in journals such as Feminist Media Studies, Gender and Education, and Qualitative Inquiry.

Veronica Gore

is a Saulteaux woman from Saskatchewan, Canada, who was raised in Nova Scotia. She is a single mother of two and recently graduated with a BA from Mount Saint Vincent University. She currently works as the coordinator of Aboriginal Student Services at the Mount. Through her work she strives to create spaces within the University that are welcoming for the students with whom she works.

Candice Groenewald

is a Post-Doctoral Fellow in the Human and Social Development (HSD) programme at the Human Sciences Research Council, South Africa. She holds a PhD in Psychology from the University of KwaZulu-Natal. Her research focus includes adolescent risk behaviours and parent-focused interventions.

Sadiyya Haffejee

is a Community-Counselling Psychologist, registered with the Health Professional Council of South Africa and is the Supervising Psychologist at a Child and Youth Care Centre. She is pursuing a PhD at North-West University with research focused on exploring, through participatory research methods, the resilience processes in sexually abused African girls. Other research interests include gender violence, social justice, community psychology, and innovative participatory methods of data collection.

Laurel Hart

is a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada Post-Doctoral Fellow at McGill University, Montreal, Canada, attached to the Networks for Change and Well-being Project. Her research explores digital multi-modal communication and social media as sites of informal education, collaborative co-creation, and network/community development. She recently guest edited a special issue, Technologies of Nonviolence: Reimagining Mobile and Social Media Practices in the Lives of Girls and Young Women, of Girlhood Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal. She is particularly interested in how technology is hacked, appropriated, and re-framed for social justice, creative practice, cultural transformation, and for young women’s self-efficacy, voice, and well-being

Fatima Khan

is a doctoral student in the Department of Integrated Studies in Education at McGill University Montreal. Canada. Her research, funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, explores children’s well-being in adverse contexts (i.e. conflict zones and disaster-struck areas) from historical, cultural, and psychosocial perspectives. Given the trauma that had given rise to them, she is interested in how children’s drawings, as a participatory arts-based method, have been used and curated. In doing so, she aims to highlight some of the tensions and ethical issues that arise in working with and exhibiting these drawings.

Sinakekelwe Khumalo

is a doctoral intern in the Human and Social Development (HSD) programme at the Human Sciences Research Council, South Africa. She is pursuing a PhD in the School of Public Health at the University of KwaZulu-Natal. Her research interests include black African masculinities, and cultural norms and practices, with a focus on males at a higher education institution.

Pamela Lamb

is a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada funded doctoral student in the Department of Integrated Studies in Education at McGill University, Montreal, Canada. Her background is broadly interdisciplinary with training in nursing, women’s studies, and media studies. She has long been interested in how girls and young women from marginalised communities are challenging normative perceptions and social inequality through art and narrative. Using participatory arts-based methods, her PhD research investigates what happens when we shift our attention from studying structures of power to studying structures of feeling. She examines affect’s possibilities for building social justice alliances in the context of gender and sexual violence.

Nicole Land

is a Pedagogical Facilitator, Researcher, and Sessional Instructor at the University of Victoria, Canada. Her family originally arrived from Ireland, Scotland, England, and Poland and she currently lives on the territory of the Coast and Straits Salish people. Her doctoral research, in the School of Child and Youth Care at the University of Victoria, drew upon collaborative pedagogical inquiry work with children and educators and focused on fats, muscles, and movement in early childhood education. She is very thankful for the opportunity to connect with the brilliant women on the Sisters Rising research team and to complete some of the behind-the-scenes work to support this inspiring research.

Samkelisiwe Luthuli

is a research assistant in the Re-enrolling young South African mothers in school as a social vaccine against HIV transmission project, a collaborative project between Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, and the University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. She holds a Master’s degree in Health Promotion from the latter. Her research interests include sexual and reproductive health issues among youth. She was an intern at the Centre for Visual Methodologies for Social Change in the project: Facilitating Access to Sexual and Reproductive Health Knowledge and Promoting Access to Post-Secondary Education among Rural Secondary School Learners in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa (2016) implemented in two resource-poor schools in Durban, South Africa.

Katie MacEntee

is a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council Post-Doctoral Fellow at York University in Canada in the Faculty of Environmental Studies. Her research revolves around the use of cellphilming to work with communities to explore contextualized solutions to gender inequality, gender-based violence and to promote harm reduction and safer sexual health practices. Her interests extend more broadly to include girlhood studies, participatory visual methodologies, and the integration of mobile technology as a research and pedagogical tool.

Bongiwe Maome

is a final year BEd student in the Faculty of Education at the Nelson Mandela University, in Port Elizabeth, South Africa. She is a member of the Girls Leading Change, a group of young women from various rural areas in South Africa who aim to confront issues of sexual violence against women on university campuses as well as in schools and communities. She is one of the contributors to 14 Times a Woman; Indigenous Stories from the Heart (2016). She is an executive member of the Black Teacher’s Association (BTA), a liaison structure aimed at bridging the communication gap between black students and university management at Nelson Mandela University.

Shantelle Moreno

is a Masters candidate in the School of Child and Youth Care at the University of Victoria, Canada. She has spent the last eight years working as an educator, youth facilitator, and counsellor. She is the eldest daughter of immigrant parents from opposite sides of the world (Fiji and Chile) and was born and raised on traditional Xw məθkwyʼəm (Musqueam) territories. Shantelle is deeply grateful for and humbled by the path onto which her family and ancestors have guided her. She is honoured to be a part of the Sisters Rising team exploring resurgence, solidarity, sovereignty, and decolonial love alongside brilliant Indigenous and racialized youth, women, and Elders.

Ndumiso Daluxolo Ngidi

is a Lecturer in the School of Agricultural, Earth and Environmental Sciences and a doctoral candidate in the School of Education at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Previously, he worked as a researcher in the Human and Social Development unit, Human Sciences Research Council. He has a Master’s degree in Development Studies from the University of KwaZulu-Natal. His research interests include engaging youth in participatory visual methodologies to address sexual violence in and around schools.

Shezell-Rae Sam

is in her final year of undergraduate studies in the School of Child and Youth Care at the University of Victoria, Canada, where she has been working on community-based research projects like Sisters Rising, and doing front-line practice with children, youth, and families involved in the child protection and foster care systems. As a mother of five, Shezell balances multiple responsibilities in support of the well-being of her family and community.

Angela Scott

is an Ojibwe|Métis|Danish|English woman. She is a child and youth mental health practitioner, a novice social science researcher, and a university sessional instructor in Canada, passionate about social justice and advocacy. Her practice is currently located at the intersection of three dominant and oppressive systems: child welfare; legal (justice); and mental health. She works primarily with children, youth, and families who have witnessed and/or experienced abuse (physical, sexual, and emotional) and systemic injustice. Her practice approach is to uphold and honour the respect and dignity of all those with whom she works.

Brian B. Sibeko

is a student at the University of South Africa (UNISA) who is passionate about the plight of marginalised communities, especially the LGBT community, young girls, and sex workers. His interests include addressing issues of homophobia, transphobia, gender-based violence, ensuring access to sexual and reproductive health and rights, and the decriminalisation of sex work. He is currently working with street-connected young people and transgender communities in the rural areas of South Africa.

Haidee Smith Lefebvre

is a doctoral candidate in the Faculty of Education at McGill University, Montreal, Canada. Her research and publication areas focus on Indigenous girlhood, kinship and youth culture, b-boy/b-girl culture, and Hip Hop.

Linda Theron

is a Full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology, Faculty of Education and an associate of the Centre for the Study of Resilience, University of Pretoria, and an extraordinary professor in the Optentia Research Focus Area, North-West University, South Africa. Her research and publications focus on the resilience processes of South African young people challenged by chronic adversity and account for how sociocultural contexts shape resilience (see www.Lindatheron.org.) She is lead editor of Youth Resilience and Culture: Complexities and Commonalities (2015). She is also an associate journal editor of Child Abuse & Neglect.

Astrid Treffry-Goately

is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the School of Education at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Her research interests lie in public engagement, gender, and women’s health, gender-based violence, digital storytelling, and the ethics of community-based participatory research. In recent years, she has focused on the advancement of participatory visual methodologies, in particular digital storytelling to investigate the health experiences of vulnerable population groups in South Africa.

Lisa Wiebesiek

is the Programmes Manager at the Centre for Visual Methodologies for Social Change, and the Project Co-ordinator for the Networks for Change and Well-being: Girl-led ‘from the ground up’ policy-making to address sexual violence in Canada and South Africa project at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa where she is a doctoral student in the School of Education. Previously, she worked in the fields of HIV prevention and rural education development. Her research interests include adolescent sexual and reproductive health and rights, gender and sexuality education, girlhood studies, and visual participatory research methodologies.

Kari-Dawn Wuttunee

is nehiyaw iskwew from the Red Pheasant First Nation in Treaty Six Territory. Currently living in Saskatoon, Canada, she works with the Saskatoon Health Region as the Manager for Building Health Equity a public health office focused on addressing health disparities in the inner city. In this role, she is able to advocate for Aboriginal wellness and health, while working in teams of health professionals and providers. As a member of the National Indigenous Young Women’s Council, her work is grounded in an anti-racist, anti-colonial, and Indigenous young-women-led and informed governance framework, and through community action projects, she is tackling issues such as HIV, harm reduction strategies, poverty, and gender-based violence prevention. She is one of the NIYWC council’s representatives on the Networks 4 Change Partnership, an international dialogue on policy-making led by girls and young women in addressing sexual violence.