Notes on Contributors

in Spelling and Writing Words
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Notes on Contributors

Olivia Afonso is an Early Career Research Fellow at the Department of Psychology, Health and Professional Development of Oxford Brookes University. She investigates the cognitive processes involved in spelling and handwriting in adults and children, with a special focus on how phonological and orthographic information interact during written production. Her most recent research interests include the nature of spelling difficulties in specific learning disorders, the representation of letter identity and position in writing and the impact of linguistic processes on handwriting movements. E-mail: afonso.o@brookes.ac.uk

Carlos J. Álvarez is Professor of Psychology at the University of La Laguna. He works in the Cognitive Psychology Department and in the University Institute of Neuroscience (IUNE). His research in experimental psychology and cognitive neuroscience has focused on visual word recognition and written word production, in adults as well as in children with (and without) learning difficulties. Second language acquisition and bilingualism have also been topics of his research. These investigations have been carried out in collaboration with scientists from other American, Australian and European countries. E-mail: calvarez@ull.edu.es

Anna Barnett is a Professor of Psychology at Oxford Brookes University, UK. Her research on handwriting has included surveys of policy and practice in primary schools and examinations of handwriting in individuals with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) and dyslexia. She has also developed standardised assessment tools to measure handwriting speed (the Detailed Assessment of Speed of Handwriting, DASH), handwriting legibility (the Handwriting Legibility Scale, HLS) and general motor competence (the Movement ABC-2). Another strand of her research focuses more specifically on aspects of DCD—including diagnosis and assessment of children and adults with this condition. E-mail: abarnett@brookes.ac.uk

Patrick Bonin is full Professor of cognitive psychology at Université de Bourgogne Franche-Comté (LEAD-CNRS UMR5022). He has been nominated at the Institut Universitaire de France (IUF senior member 2010–2015). He is working on written/spoken production, psycholinguistic norms and episodic memory within an evolutionary psychology perspective. E-mail: Patrick.Bonin@u-bourgogne.fr

Vince Connelly is Professor of Psychology at Oxford Brookes University. His research involves studying children and adults including those diagnosed with dyslexia or specific language disorders. who have difficulty with various aspects of writing such as spelling or handwriting. Working with colleagues at Oxford Brookes, University College London and elsewhere, he has published a wide range of articles contributing to our understanding of struggling writers. He has also worked with teachers and educators in order to investigate the best ways to help struggling writers overcome their difficulties. E-mail: vconnelly@brookes.ac.uk

Markus L. Damian is a Professor of psychology of language at the University of Bristol, United Kingdom. His research focusses the cognitive and neural basis of spoken as well as written language processing, with a particular emphasis on lexical and phonological/orthographic retrieval. His recent work has focussed on comparisons between Western and non-Western (i.e., Chinese) language production, and involves behavioural, encephalographic and computational approaches. E-mail: m.damian@bristol.ac.uk

Michel Fayol is Emeritus Professor at the Laboratoire de Psychologie Sociale et Cognitive (LAPSCO CNRS) at Clermont Auvergne University. His research in developmental and educational psychology investigates the learning and use of literacy and numeracy in typical people, children as well as adults. More specifically, he is interested in the way children and adults manage in real time the numerous cognitive processes (handwriting, spelling, translating, planning) involved in composing texts and in problem-solving. E-mail: michel.fayol@uca.fr

Silvain Gerber works as a statistician at the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS). He works in the GIPSA-lab, which is a joint research unit of the University of Grenoble Alpes and the CNRS. He supervises the design of te experiments and carries out the data analysis. E-mail: silvain.gerber@gipsa-lab.grenoble-inp.fr

Sonia Kandel is a full Professor in cognitive science at the University of Grenoble Alpes. She carries out her research at the GIPSA-lab (CNRS UMR 5216). Her research focuses on the normal and pathological processes of writing acquisition, both the orthographic and graphomotor aspects. E-mail: Sonia.kandel@univ-grenoble-alpes.fr

Alain Méot is Assistant Professor in statistics in psychology at Université Clermont Auvergne (LAPSCO-CNRS UMR6024). He is working on written/spoken production, psycholinguistic norms and episodic memory within an evolutionary psychology perspective. E-mail: alain.meot@uca.fr

Marion Nys PhD, is a neuropsychologist and research engineer at MC2 Lab, at the University Paris Descartes. Her main research investigates memory, spatial cognition, statistical learning and spelling acquisition in children and adults. E-mail: nys.marion@gmail.com

Thierry Olive is Senior Research Scientist at the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS, France). He works in the Center for Research on Cognition and Learning, a joint unit of the Université de Poitiers and of the CNRS. His research in experimental psychology investigates writing and learning to write in typical writers, as well as in writers with language or learning difficulties. More specifically, he analyses regulation of the cognitive processes involved in writing, their relation with working memory as well as the role of emotions in writing and the impact of writing tools. E-mail: thierry.olive@univ-poitiers.fr

Sébastien Pacton is Professor of Developmental Cognitive Psychology at the University Paris Descartes. He works in the MC2 Lab in Paris and he is a member of the LABEX EFL (ANR-10-LABX-0083). His main research interests include implicit statistical learning mechanisms and their roles in spelling acquisition, with a particular interest for the role of graphotactic and morphological knowledge. E-mail: sebastien.pacton@parisdescartes.fr

Ronald Peereman PhD, is Research Scientist for the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS, France). He works at the Psychology and Neurocognition laboratory, Grenoble-Alpes University, France. His main research interests include word recognition processes in the visual and auditory modalities, statistical learning in word segmentation in continuous speech, reading and spelling acquisition, and distributional analyses of the orthographic, phonological, and morphological characteristics of the French writing system. E-mail: ronald.peereman@univ-grenoble-alpes.fr

Cyril Perret is Assistant Professor in psychology at Université de Poitiers (CeRCA-CNRS). He is working on writing in adult and children, psycholinguistic norms and statistical implementation of written processing. He analyses the cognitive processes involved in word writing and their dynamics with behavioral, neurophysiological (EEG) and statistical implementation methods. E-mail: cyril.perret@univ-poitiers.fr

Qingqing Qu is full Professor of cognitive psychology at department of Psychology, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences (Beijing, China) and member of the Key Laboratory of Behavioral Science at the Institute of Psychology (Chinese Academy of Sciences). She is working on written/spoken production in Chinese. He analyses the cognitive processes involved in word production and their dynamics with behavioral and neurophysiological (EEG) methods. E-mail: quqq@psych.ac.cn

Brenda Rapp is a Professor in the Department of Cognitive Science at Johns Hopkins University (Baltimore, USA). She is editor-in-chief of the journal Cognitive Neuropsychology and has served on the boards of various scientific societies including the Academy of Aphasia and the Society for the Neurobiology of Language. Her research focuses on understanding the cognitive and neural processes involved in written language, with a particular emphasis on spelling processes and representations, using methods from cognitive neuropsychology, psycholinguistics, neuroimaging and computational modelling. E-mail: brapp1@jhu.edu

Marie-Josèphe Tainturier is Senior Lecturer in the School of Psychology at Bangor University, UK. She is also the director of the Bilingualism Research Centre at Bangor University. Her research investigates the cognitive and neural mechanisms that underlie language processing in children and adults with or without neurological conditions, with a particular focus on reading and writing disorders, neuropsychological assessment and rehabilitation, and bilingualism. E-mail: m.j.tainturier@bangor.ac.uk

Laurence Séraphin-Thibon just finished her PhD at the Grenoble-Alpes University (France) under the supervision of Sonia Kandel. The topic of her thesis in cognitive science investigated the elaboration of motor programs in handwriting for children from ages 6 to 10. More specifically, she studied how the motor programs for letter production develop during handwriting acquisition as well as the specific processes involved in rotation and pointing movements. E-mail: Laurence.thibon@orange.fr

Yannick Wamain is lecturer at the University of Lille. He works in the Cognitive and Affective Sciences Laboratory (SCALab), a joint unit of the University of Lille and of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), where he is a member of the Action, Vision and Learning Team. His research in experimental psychology investigates the relation between Perception and Action with behavioral and neurophysiological paradigm. More specifically, he studies the impact of motor knowledge on visual perception of stimuli implying biological motion: like manipulable objects and/or handwritten letters. E-mail: yannick.wamain@univ-lille.fr