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Figures
3.1.Are humans and animals different?55
3.2.“Mad Hatter’s Tea Party” in the quad of the Neville Alexander Building, University of Cape Town.59
3.3.Can I be seen by the animal? A range of picture books: zoomorphism, anthropomorphism or mechanomorphism? (Personal collection).64
3.4.“Something strange happened here”: The lions’ den II in the Groote Schuur Zoo in Cape Town.66
3.5.Abigail Mallows, The ghostly silhouette of a lion lying at the foot of a wall.67
3.6.Are humans also in a cage?68
3.7.“Thick now-time”: Diffracting Cape human and non-human zebra stripes and bars of the animal prisons (Hannah Sunpath and Megan Parker).69
3.8.Chantal Manton and her temporally diffracted lion in the Groote Schuur Zoo.70
4.1.“Pink Lady” and “Gala” apples painted by the author. Differences-between and self-difference are accentuated in perception through drawing.86
4.2.Will and wildness in watercolour painting. Christine Chesterman created this beautiful piece in one of the author’s environmental education Master’s programme classes.90
5.1.A water body in a public park.118
5.2.Flooded area.121
5.3.Disappearing “contours”: Water in different physical states.121
5.4.Swans in the water.122
5.5.Swans outside the pond.123
5.6.Negotiating boundaries and pond-grass.123
5.7.“To paint a water lily” by Ted Hughes.126
7.1.Dramatising Little seed: “Wriggling” legs. The original photo was taken by the preschool teachers and is here reproduced in an edited format, with the teachers’ permission.156
7.2.Painting on a video projection of sunflowers. The original photo was taken by the preschool teachers and is here reproduced in an edited format, with the teachers’ permission.158
7.3.One child following the shadow’s movement on the wall and one child spinning (wondering if the shadow will still be there after the full turn?). The original photo was taken by a preschool teacher and is here reproduced in an edited format, with the teacher’s permission.160
8.1.Reconfiguring disciplines.173
8.2The stressed Vitruvian man by Euclid, a male, aged 16 years, in grade 11 at a private school that facilitates learners from less privileged backgrounds and thus has a socioeconomically varied environment.183
8.3.Soul number by Annika, a female, aged 15 years, in Grade 10 at a fee-paying public school where the school community is from low to average socioeconomic background.188
8.4.Mechanis by Jabulani, a male, age 17 years, in Grade 12 at a non-fee-paying public school, from a low socioeconomic background.192
9.1.Gary’s identity picture, day 1, Melbourne, 2019.210
9.2.Gary’s identity picture, day 2, Melbourne, 2019.211
9.3.Mohammed’s identity picture, Melbourne, 2019.212
9.4.Ryan’s identity pictures, Manchester, 2018.214
9.5.Joy Palace, Equality City, Friendship City and Sustainability City in the making, Sydney, 2016.216
9.6.“Sustainability City”, Sydney, 2016.216
9.7.“All the streets are rivers”, Manchester, 2017.217
9.8.Adelaide church youth group “Green City”, 2018.218
9.9.Cars that fly with bird-like wings, Sydney, 2016.220
9.10.Flying ice-cream factory with an internal soccer pitch, Melbourne, 2019.222
9.11.Flying recycling centre, Melbourne, 2019.222
9.12.UFO mosque, Manchester, 2017.223
11.1.Clay balls the size of apples are put in a circle on the ground.248
11.2.Determining the direction in which the organic forms will develop further in time.250
11.3.Working together on one “social sculpture”.252
12.1.Net of plastics, data artefact.280
12.2.Netted glow moments.281
12.3.Jellyfish sculpture created from plastic bottle.282
12.4.Data excerpts from questionnaire analysis and teacher research conversation, noting changes in students’ behaviour and perception of Art and Science.283
12.5.Data excerpt from Kerry during a research conversation with teachers, noting pupil’s use of Arts and Sciences as she responds to her own question.284
12.6.Data excerpts showing pupils’ intra-action with materials and association of creativity with making, colour and inquiry.285
12.7.Data excerpts within the net, showing ‘embodied, material-dialogic spaces’.286
12.8.The ‘net’ produced for diffraction 3.289
12.9.Data excerpt highlighting pupil perspectives on environmental responsibility, captured through thematic analysis of questionnaire data.291
12.10.Data excerpts showing pupil association of environmental responsibility with the future, and with discovery.292
13.1.DMirroring exercise introduced by the workshop leader. (Maths in Motion activity led by experience workshop at IC Codogno School, Italy in 2018).310
13.2.Mirroring exercise. (Maths in Motion activity led by experience workshop at IC Codogno School, Italy in 2018).310
13.3.Maths in Motion dancing snowflake activity led by experience workshop at IC Codogno School, Italy in 2018 (photograph by Giada Totaro).312
13.4.Maths in Motion different levels exercise by SciCo, Greece. (a) Low level; (b) middle level; (c) high level.313
13.5.Walking like an elephant. Monkeys and Elephants module led by experience workshop at a kindergarten in Codogno, Italy in 2018 (photograph by Giada Totaro).316
13.6.Discussing the pawprints of monkeys and elephants. Activity led by experience workshop at a kindergarten in Codogno, Italy in 2018 (photography by Giada Totaro).317
13.7.Discussing and drawing the pawprints of monkeys and elephants. Activity led by experience workshop at a kindergarten in Codogno, Italy in 2018 (photograph by Giada Totaro).317
13.8.Creating small paths on the floor. Activity led by experience workshop at a kindergarten in Codogno, Italy in 2018 (photograph by Giada Totaro).318
13.9.Practising walking small paths on the floor. Activity led by experience workshop at a kindergarten in Codogno, Italy in 2018 (photograph by Giada Totaro).319
13.10.Teachers are preparing the dragon forest in Şcoala Gimnazială nr. 20, Galati, Romania.321
13.11.Teachers are dressing up and acting as dragons in Şcoala Gimnazială nr. 20, Galati, Romania.321
13.12Practising egg hunt as dragons in Şcoala Gimnazială nr. 20, Galati, Romania.322
13.13Stepping through the magic threshold to become dragons in Şcoala Gimnazială nr. 20, Galati, Romania.323
13.14.Eggs brought back to the dragons’ cave in Şcoala Gimnazială nr. 20, Galati, Romania.324
13.15.Teachers’ mime performance of the maths story in Şcoala Gimnazială nr. 20, Galati, Romania.324
13.16.“Moving on the Integer Line” activity in Şcoala Gimnazială nr. 20, Galati, Romania.328
13.17.“Warm and Cold” activity in Şcoala Gimnazială nr. 20, Galati, Romania.329
15.1.Testing leavening agent action in the lab, here baking soda in cold water with and without a solid acid.368
15.2.Conceptualisation of oscillation between aesthetic and analytic in creative inquiry activities building on crossmodal correspondences as modelled by Case 2.375
16.1.Child-friendly, ranger-adapted beach litter survey sheet.389
16.2.Beach clean volunteer survey sheet (Source: Marine Conservation Society).390
16.3.The children grimacing as they reach out to the litter in the classroom.394
16.4.The finished mandala.396
16.5.A close-up of the mandala.396
17.1.Go for it or hesitate?410
17.2.Material thinking.411
17.3.Trying it out and “noodling”.411
17.4.Playing with my research materials.412
17.5.Touching … slowly.413
17.6.Tromboning, clarinetting and guitaring.416
17.7.Facilitating or making?419
Tables
8.1.Additional details concerning student, school, and competition.179
14.1.List of capabilities used for a priori coding, with examples of text assigned to each code.346
15.1.Results from chemistry lab activity showing under which conditions and with which other ingredients the three leavening agents may function (+ = gas production; − = no gas production; +/− = a little gas production; ? = ambiguous result).369
15.2.Task distribution for cookie baking homework to test effect of leavening agent.369
15.3.Example of results from blind tasting of cookies (names of columns are revealed after conducted the blind tasting).370

Why Science and Art Creativities Matter

(Re-)Configuring STEAM for Future-Making Education

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