Prospective but not retrospective tool selection in the Goffin’s cockatoo (Cacatua goffiniana)

In: Behaviour
View More View Less
  • a Department of Cognitive Biology, University of Vienna, Althanstr. 14, 1090 Vienna, Austria
  • | b Unit of Comparative Cognition, Messerli Research Institute, University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna, Medical University of Vienna, University of Vienna, Veterinärplatz 1, 1210 Vienna, Austria

Purchase instant access (PDF download and unlimited online access):

€29.95$34.95

Abstract

The ability to select the necessary means for a familiar task while the task itself or the respective tools are out of sight suggests a rudimentary form of planning. Here we investigated if and how a non-specialized tool using bird, the Goffin’s cockatoo, can prospectively or retrospectively select the functional tool in a decision-making task featuring two different types of apparatuses and their corresponding tools. Each apparatus could only be employed with one specific type of tool. Either the apparatus was presented and occluded prior to the presentation of the tools (prospective condition) or the tools were presented and occluded prior to the presentation of the apparatus (retrospective condition). Our results suggest the birds can prospectively but not retrospectively select the correct tool, paralleling previous research in tool using apes, and indicate at least simple forms of prospective selection in the tool use of a species distantly related to primates.

  • Auersperg, A.M., Gajdon, G.K. & Huber, L. (2010). Kea, Nestor notabilis, produce dynamic relationships between objects in a second-order tool use task. — Anim. Behav. 80: 783-789.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Auersperg, A.M., Huber, L. & Gajdon, G.K. (2011). Navigating a tool end in a specific direction: stick-tool use in kea (Nestor notabilis). — Biol. Lett. rsbl20110388.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Auersperg, A.M., Szabo, B., von Bayern, A.M. & Kacelnik, A. (2012). Spontaneous innovation in tool manufacture and use in a Goffin’s cockatoo. — Curr. Biol. 22: R903-R904.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Auersperg, A.M., Kacelnik, A. & von Bayern, A.M. (2013a). Explorative learning and functional inferences on a five-step means-means-end problem in Goffin’s cockatoos (Cacatua goffini). — PLoS One 8: e68979.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Auersperg, A.M.I., Laumer, I.B. & Bugnyar, T. (2013b). Goffin cockatoos wait for qualitative and quantitative gains but prefer ‘better’ to ‘more’. — Biol. Lett. 9: 20121092.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Auersperg, A.M.I., von Bayern, A.M.I., Weber, S., Szabadvari, A., Bugnyar, T. & Kacelnik, A. (2014a). Social transmission of tool use and tool manufacture in Goffin cockatoos (Cacatua goffini). — Proc. Roy. Soc. Lond. B: Biol. Sci. 281: 20140972.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Auersperg, A.M.I., Oswald, N., Domanegg, M., Gajdon, G.K. & Bugnyar, T. (2014b). Unrewarded object combinations in captive parrots. — Anim. Behav. Cogn. 1: 470-488.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Auersperg, A.M., Szabo, B., von Bayern, A.M. & Bugnyar, T. (2014c). Object permanence in the Goffin cockatoo (Cacatua goffini). — J. Comp. Psychol. 128: 88-98.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Auersperg, A.M., van Horik, J.O., Bugnyar, T., Kacelnik, A., Emery, N.J. & von Bayern, A.M. (2015). Combinatory actions during object play in psittaciformes (Diopsittaca nobilis, Pionites melanocephala, Cacatua goffini) and corvids (Corvus corax, C. monedula, C. moneduloides). — J. Comp. Psychol. 129: 62-71.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Auersperg, A.M., Borasinski, S., Laumer, I. & Kacelnik, A. (2016). Goffin’s cockatoos make the same tool type from different materials. — Biol. Lett. 12: 20160689.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Auersperg, A.M.I., Köck, C., Pledermann, A., O’Hara, M. & Huber, L. (2017). Safekeeping of tools in Goffin’s cockatoos, Cacatua goffiniana. — Anim. Behav. 128: 125-133.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Bird, C.D. & Emery, N.J. (2009). Insightful problem solving and creative tool modification by captive nontool-using rooks. — Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 106: 10370-10375.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Boesch, C. & Boesch, H. (1984). Mental map in wild chimpanzees: an analysis of hammer transports for nut cracking. — Primates 25: 160-170.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Bräuer, J. & Call, J. (2015). Apes produce tools for future use. — Am. J. Primatol. 77: 254-263.

  • Byrne, R.W., Sanz, C.M. & Morgan, D.B. (2013). Chimpanzees plan their tool use. — In: Tool use in animals: cognition and ecology (Sanz, C.M., Call, J. & Boesch, C., eds). Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, p. 48-64.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Call, J. (2013). Three ingredients for becoming a creative tool user. — In: Tool use in animals: cognition and ecology (Sanz, C.M., Call, J. & Boesch, C., eds). Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, p. 3-20.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Chappell, J. & Kacelnik, A. (2002). Tool selectivity in a non-primate, the New Caledonian crow (Corvus moneduloides). — Anim. Cogn. 5: 71-78.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Chappell, J. & Kacelnik, A. (2004). Selection of tool diameter by New Caledonian crows Corvus moneduloides. — Anim. Cogn. 7: 121-127.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Clayton, N.S., Emery, N.J. & Dickinson, A. (2006). The prospective cognition of food caching and recovery by western scrub jays (Aphelocoma californica). — Comp. Cogn. Behav. Rev. 1: 1-11.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Crystal, J.D. (2013a). Prospective memory. — Curr. Biol. 23: R750-R751.

  • Crystal, J.D. (2013b). Remembering the past and planning for the future in rats. — Behav. Proc. 93: 39-49.

  • Crystal, J.D. & Wilson, A.G. (2015). Prospective memory: a comparative perspective. — Behav. Proc. 112: 88-99.

  • de Kort, S.R., Dickinson, A. & Clayton, N.S. (2005). Retrospective cognition by food-caching western scrub-jays. — Learn. Motiv. 36: 159-176.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Diamond, J. & Bond, A.B. (1999). Kea, bird of paradox: the evolution and behavior of a New Zealand parrot. — University of California Press, Berkeley, CA.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Evans, T.A. & Beran, M.J. (2012). Monkeys exhibit prospective memory in a computerized task. — Cognition 125: 131-140.

  • Fragaszy, D., Izar, P., Visalberghi, E., Ottoni, E.B. & de Oliveira, M.G. (2004). Wild capuchin monkeys (Cebus libidinosus) use anvils and stone pounding tools. — Am. J. Primatol. 64: 359-366.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Goodall, J. (1964). Tool-using and aimed throwing in a community of free-living chimpanzees. — Nature 201: 1264-1266.

  • Goto, K. & Watanabe, S. (2012). Large-billed crows (Corvus macrorhynchos) have retrospective but not prospective metamemory. — Anim. Cogn. 15: 27-35.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Gruber, R. (2016). Comparing matching and non-matching abilities in Goffin cockatoos (Cacatua goffiniana). — Master’s Thesis, University of Vienna, Vienna.

  • Güntürkün, O. & Bugnyar, T. (2016). Cognition without cortex. — Trends Cogn. Sci. 20: 291-303.

  • Habl, C. & Auersperg, A.M.I. (2017). The keybox: shape-frame fitting during tool use in Goffin’s cockatoos (Cacatua goffiniana). — PLoS One 12: e0186859.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Holzhaider, J.C., Hunt, G.R., Campbell, V.M. & Gray, R.D. (2008). Do wild New Caledonian crows (Corvus moneduloides) attend to the functional properties of their tools? — Anim. Cogn. 11: 243-254.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Honig, W.K. & Wasserman, E.A. (1981). Performance of pigeons on delayed simple and conditional discrimination under equivalent training procedures. — Learn. Motiv. 12: 149-170.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Hunt, G.R. (1996). Manufacture and use of hook-tools by New Caledonian crows. — Nature 379: 249.

  • Hunt, G.R., Rutledge, R.B. & Gray, R.D. (2006). The right tool for the job: what strategies do wild New Caledonian crows use? — Anim. Cogn. 9: 307-316.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Kabadayi, C. & Osvath, M. (2017). Ravens parallel great apes in flexible planning for tool-use and bartering. — Science 357: 202-204.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Laumer, I.B., Bugnyar, T. & Auersperg, A.M.I. (2016). Flexible decision-making relative to reward quality and tool functionality in Goffin cockatoos (Cacatua goffiniana). — Sci. Rep. 6: 28380.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Luncz, L.V., Falótico, T., Pascual-Garrido, A., Corat, C., Mosley, H. & Haslam, M. (2016). Wild capuchin monkeys adjust stone tools according to changing nut properties. — Sci. Rep. 6: 33089.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Manrique, H.M., Gross, A.N.M. & Call, J. (2010). Great apes select tools on the basis of their rigidity. — J. Exp. Psychol.: Anim. Behav. Proc. 36: 409-422.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Martin-Ordas, G., Atance, C.M. & Call, J. (2014). Remembering in tool-use tasks in children and apes: the role of the information at encoding. — Memory 22: 129-144.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Martin-Ordas, G., Schumacher, L. & Call, J. (2012). Sequential tool use in great apes. — PLoS One 7: e52074.

  • Morgan, G., Kornell, N., Kornblum, T. & Terrace, H.S. (2014). Retrospective and prospective metacognitive judgments in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). — Anim. Cogn. 17: 249-257.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Mulcahy, N.J. & Call, J. (2006). Apes save tools for future use. — Science 312: 1038-1040.

  • Mulcahy, N.J., Call, J. & Dunbar, R.I. (2005). Gorillas (Gorilla gorilla) and orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus) encode relevant problem features in a tool-using task. — J. Comp. Psychol. 119: 23-32.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • O’Hara, M., Auersperg, A.M., Bugnyar, T. & Huber, L. (2015a). Inference by exclusion in goffin cockatoos (Cacatua goffini). — PLoS One 10: e0134894.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • O’Hara, M., Huber, L. & Gajdon, G.K. (2015b). The advantage of objects over images in discrimination and reversal learning by kea, Nestor notabilis. — Anim. Behav. 101: 51-60.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Olkowicz, S., Kocourek, M., Lučan, R.K., Porteš, M., Fitch, W.T., Herculano-Houzel, S. & Němec, P. (2016). Birds have primate-like numbers of neurons in the forebrain. — Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 113: 7255-7260.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Osuna-Mascaró, A.J. & Auersperg, A.M.I. (2018). On the brink of tool use? Could object combinations during foraging in a feral Goffin’s cockatoo (Cacatua goffiniana) result in tool innovations? — Anim. Behav. Cogn. 5: 229-234. https://doi.org/10.26451/abc.05.02.05.2018.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Osvath, M. (2009). Spontaneous planning for future stone throwing by a male chimpanzee. — Curr. Biol. 19: R190-R191.

  • Osvath, M. & Osvath, H. (2008). Chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) and orangutan (Pongo abelii) forethought: self-control and pre-experience in the face of future tool use. — Anim. Cogn. 11: 661-674.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Pepperberg, I.M., Koepke, A., Livingston, P., Girard, M. & Hartsfield, L.A. (2013). Reasoning by inference: further studies on exclusion in grey parrots (Psittacus erithacus). — J. Comp. Psychol. 127: 272-281.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Raby, C.R. & Clayton, N.S. (2009). Prospective cognition in animals. — Behav. Proc. 80: 314-324.

  • Sanz, C.M. & Morgan, D.B. (2009). Flexible and persistent tool-using strategies in honey-gathering by wild chimpanzees. — Int. J. Primatol. 30: 411-427.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Shumaker, R.W., Walkup, K.R. & Beck, B.B. (2011). Animal tool behavior: the use and manufacture of tools by animals. — Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, MD.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Spagnoletti, N., Visalberghi, E., Ottoni, E., Izar, P. & Fragaszy, D. (2011). Stone tool use by adult wild bearded capuchin monkeys (Cebus libidinosus). Frequency, efficiency and tool selectivity. — J. Hum. Evol. 61: 97-107.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Spetch, M.L. & Friedman, A. (2006). Comparative cognition of object recognition. — Comp. Cogn. Behav. Rev. 1: 12-35.

  • Stephan, C., Steurer, M.M. & Aust, U. (2014). Discrimination of holograms and real objects by pigeons (Columba livia) and humans (Homo sapiens). — J. Comp. Psychol. 128: 261-275.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Szabo, B., Bugnyar, T. & Auersperg, A.M.I. (2016). Within-group relationships and lack of social enhancement during object manipulation in captive Goffin’s cockatoos (Cacatua goffiniana). — Learn. Behav.: 1-13.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Taylor, A.H., Elliffe, D.M., Hunt, G.R., Emery, N.J., Clayton, N.S. & Gray, R.D. (2011). New Caledonian crows learn the functional properties of novel tool types. — PLoS One 6: e26887.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Thorpe, C.M., Jacova, C. & Wilkie, D.M. (2004). Some pitfalls in measuring memory in animals. — Neurosci. Biobehav. Rev. 28: 711-718.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Urcuioli, P.J. & Zentall, T.R. (1990). On the role of trial outcomes in delayed discriminations. — Learn. Behav. 18: 141-150.

  • Visalberghi, E., Addessi, E., Truppa, V., Spagnoletti, N., Ottoni, E., Izar, P. & Fragaszy, D. (2009). Selection of effective stone tools by wild bearded capuchin monkeys. — Curr. Biol. 19: 213-217.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Visalberghi, E., Fragaszy, D.M. & Savage-Rumbaugh, S. (1995). Performance in a tool-using task by common chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), bonobos (Pan paniscus), an orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus), and capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella). — J. Comp. Psychol. 109: 52-60.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Weir, A.A., Chappell, J. & Kacelnik, A. (2002). Shaping of hooks in New Caledonian crows. — Science 297: 981.

  • Wilson, A.G. & Crystal, J.D. (2012). Prospective memory in the rat. — Anim. Cogn. 15: 349-358.

Content Metrics

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 304 141 8
Full Text Views 25 8 0
PDF Views & Downloads 38 17 0